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Archive for the ‘Meet the Author’ Category

As part of our mission to promote authors, the joy of reading, and to better understand the craft of writing, we’ve paired with the The Norwich Bookstore in Norwich, Vermont to present an ongoing series entitled “3 Questions”.  In it, we pose three questions to authors with upcoming visits to the bookstore.  Their responses are posted on The Book Jam during the week leading up to their engagement.  Our hope is that this exchange will offer insight into their work and will encourage readers to attend these special author events.

We are breaking our tradition of not posting in August because we are excited to again welcome author and friend Lizi Boyd for the debut of her latest work, an enchanting picture book called Flashlight.

Ms. Boyd has written and illustrated many children’s books including the critically acclaimed Inside Outside, but her talent doesn’t stop with books. She also creates other art such as the papers and stationery — all available for purchase from the Norwich Bookstore. She is our first repeat author, so it was fun to see how her answers differ this time around.  (When we return in autumn, we will debut three new questions for this series.)

Ms. Boyd will appear in her Norwich studio from 5 to 7 pm on Friday, August 15 to celebrate the publication of Flashlight.  (Click here for directions.) While the book is geared to preschoolers, all ages will enjoy Flashlight, and all are welcome during this special studio event.  While you wait to visit her studio, be sure to click here to watch Flashlight‘s movie trailer.

Because this event is not at the Bookstore, reservations are not required, but an RSVP is appreciated. When you call (802) 649-1114 to RSVP, you may also pre-order your signed copy of Flashlight

1. What three books have helped shape you into the author you are today, and why?

The Mouse Who Liked to Read in Bed by Miriam Clark Potter and Zenas Potter. I just found my ratty little copy from 1958. I wasn’t reading yet, but I vividly remember the first PG w/ black and white illustration: “Scuffie was a little field mouse with bright brown eyes. He liked to read in bed. He had a tiny table made of an empty spool. He had found that in a wastebasket. By his bed was a pink birthday candle. That was his reading light. One day, in an old doll house, way up in the farm house attic, he had run across a wee, wee quilt. He had dragged that home, for a bedcover. And his bed! He had fixed up a tiny four-poster, with a candy box, and some stubby pencils”. This little book influenced not only a desire to make drawings and stories out of the littlest bits of ideas but also must have given me my big love of being cozy in bed with a pile of books. (NOTE: Sadly, this book is now out of print.)

So of course, Maurice Sendak, who illustrated a A Kiss for Little Bear by Else Holmelund Minarik (a friend of my mothers, which I just discovered via an inscription, along with my mothers notes of her phone number and address). Also, Leo Lionni and little books by Hockney and the list could go on and on.

2. What author (living or dead) would you most like to have a cup of coffee with and why? 

I’ve been waiting since last year when I answered this question, and it’s still tea with Ursula Nordstrom. She was a brilliant editor who worked with absolutely everyone mid-century and changed the world of “children’s books”.

3. What books are currently on your bedside table?

The three books reside by my bed. I just finished The Stories by Jane Gardam, meeting all sorts of old and new characters, and really meeting them because Ms. Gardam gives that to the reader.  Quiet Dell by Jayne Anne Phillips which I’ve just dipped into. And, Euphoria by Lily King, which is waiting for me.

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As part of our mission to promote authors, the joy of reading, and to better understand the craft of writing, we’ve paired with the The Norwich Bookstore in Norwich, Vermont to present an ongoing series entitled “3 Questions”.

v fish

In it, we pose three questions to authors with upcoming visits to the bookstore. Their responses are posted on The Book Jam during the days leading up to their engagement. Our hope is that this exchange will offer insight into their work and will encourage readers to both attend these special author events and read their books.

vf cover

Today, we feature Victoria Fish author of A Brief Moment of Weightlessness, a collection of short stories. In addition to writing short stories, and blogging about life, Ms. Fish is pursuing her Masters of Social Work. Her stories have appeared in numerous literary magazines, including Hunger Mountain, Slow Trains, Wild River Review, and Literary Mama. She lives with her husband and three boys in our hometown in Vermont. A Brief Moment of Weightlessness is her first published book.

Ms. Fish will appear at the Norwich Bookstore at 7 pm on Wednesday, June 25th to discuss her book and her work. Reservations are recommended. Call 802-649-1114 or email info@norwichbookstore.com to reserve your seat. We have heard it is close to “selling out” so call soon.

 

1. What three books have helped shape you into the author you are today, and why?

The Summer of My German Soldier, by Bette Green. My Antonia, by Willa Cather. Angle of Repose, by Wallace Stegner.  All three of these books took me beyond my known world, while at the same time, almost miraculously, connected me with my own experiences of joy and wonder and loss. Books like these that both create a sense of yearning and a sense of finding make me want to write.

2. What author (living or dead) would you most like to have a cup of coffee with and why?

Mary Ladd Gavell, the author of I Cannot Tell A Lie Exactly.  Gavell died at the age of 47, having only published one story. That story, posthumously, was chosen by John Updike as one of the Best Short Stories of the Century, and, after that her children published a book of her stories. She writes about motherhood (and other topics) with understated poignancy, honesty and wit. There is one story called “The Swing” about a mother who imagines that her son, now in his 30’s, visits the backyard at night as a 6 year old boy again. I cannot get through that story without crying, every time, sideswiped anew with how she writes with such simplicity and power about intangible loss. I want to ask her, how did she do it? What else would she have written if she hadn’t died?

3. What books are currently on your bedside table?

Mrs. Somebody Somebody, stories by Tracy Winn. Runaway, stories by Alice Munro. Red Bird: Poems, poems by Mary Oliver. I have read all three, but I always keep a few books like this to dip into again and again, words I know will satisfy me.

 

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As part of our mission to promote authors, the joy of reading, and to better understand the craft of writing, we’ve paired with the The Norwich Bookstore in Norwich, Vermont to present an ongoing series entitled “3 Questions”.  In it, we pose three questions to authors with upcoming visits to the bookstore. Their responses are posted on The Book Jam during the days leading up to their engagement. Our hope is that this exchange will offer insight into their work and will encourage readers to both attend these special author events and read their books.

Today, we feature Jennifer Senior author of All Joy and No Fun: The Paradox of Modern Parenting.  She is a contributing editor at New York Magazine, where she writes profiles and cover stories about politics, social science and mental health. She is the recipient of numerous awards for her journalism, and graduated summa cum laude from Princeton in 1991.  All Joy and No Fun is her first book. To preview her visit to Norwich, you may wish to watch her recent TED talk.

Ms. Senior will appear at the Norwich Bookstore at 7 pm on Wednesday, May 21st to discuss her book and her work. Reservations are recommended. Call 802-649-1114 or email info@norwichbookstore.com to reserve your seat.

1. What three books have helped shape you into the author you are today, and why? 

I think Arlie Hochschild’s The Second Shift and Oliver Sacks An Anthropologist on Mars (or any of Sacks’ books, for that matter) both showed me how beguiling case studies could be, and how important they are to make narrative nonfiction come alive when you’re juggling tons of data; otherwise, your writing becomes a plague of statistics and citations. The writing of Michael Chabon (The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay and The Yiddish Policemen’s Union especially, but really, all of it) and Richard Russo (The Risk Pool and Empire Falls especially, but again, all of it) taught me how important it is to love and feel compassion for your characters (I only profiled families I really liked for All Joy and No Fun.) And like many women, I went through a huge Jane Austen phase in college, and tried to write just like her.

 

2. What author (living or dead) would you most like to have a cup of coffee with and why?

Anthony Trollope. He was so impossibly prolific, and he wrote like an angel, and his range was staggering, and he did it all WHILE HOLDING DOWN A DAY JOB.

3. What books are currently on your bedside table?

Bridge of Sighs, by Richard Russo (one of the only books of his I haven’t read); S, by Doug Dorst; The Story of the Human Body: Evolution, Health, and Disease by Daniel Lieberman; a galley of The Big Fat Surpriseby Nina Teicholz.

 

Read Full Post »

As part of our mission to promote authors, the joy of reading, and to better understand the craft of writing, we’ve paired with the The Norwich Bookstore in Norwich, Vermont to present an ongoing series entitled “3 Questions”.  In it, we pose three questions to authors with upcoming visits to the bookstore.  Their responses are posted on The Book Jam during the days leading up to their engagement.  Our hope is that this exchange will offer insight into their work and will encourage readers to attend these special author events and read their books.

This post features Marianne Szegedy-Maszak author of I Kiss Your Hands: Hearts, Souls, and Wars in Hungary, her first book.  Ms. Szegedy-Maszak’s journalism career has spanned over twenty-five years and has included covering the collapse of communism, the Republican Revolution, 9/11 and social policy for the New York Times Magazine, Esquire, Harpers Bazaar, and many more.

Ms. Szegedy-Maszak will appear at the Norwich Bookstore at 7 pm on Wednesday, April 9th to discuss her work. Reservations are recommended. Call 802-649-1114 or email info@norwichbookstore.com to reserve your seat.

1. What three books have helped shape you into the author you are today, and why? 

Always difficult to narrow things down to threes, when there is such a rich and wonderful collection of influences. One of the first and most influential books for me was Nixon Agonistes by Garry Wills. It was a book that grew out of his brilliant coverage in Esquire of Nixon’s campaign and I was a senior in high school when I read it and at that moment knew I wanted to be a journalist. The depth of insight, the richness of his writing, and the way he brought his formidable intellect to bear on covering this tragic president– before Watergate– was astonishing.

I remember reading Speak Memory by Nabokov, a memoir of his life in Czarist Russia right at the twilight of an era, with a little notebook and every once in a while I would just copy a sentence or a phrase. The details and the fluidity of memory that he captured by focusing on the most minute, superficially trivial details taught me that in memoir, it is so often about the trees, not the forest.

My Antonia by Willa Cather is a book that always brings a little lump in my throat when I think about it. Cather wrote with such astonishing simplicity in the voice of a young man, a slightly unreliable narrator, who nonetheless kept me suspended between his internal life and the world all around him. She had such total confidence as a writer, every word rings true, nothing is extraneous from physical to emotional details. After the more rococo prose of Wills and Nabokov, Cather is the cool drink of water.

2. What author (living or dead) would you most like to have a cup of coffee with and why?

I struggled to avoid being a Rebecca Mead copy-cat, but unfortunately I have to admit, that I would love to have a cup of coffee (or perhaps tea, or perhaps a good strong drink) with Mary Ann Evans, also known as George Eliot.  I loved Middlemarch, of course, always preferred her to Jane Austen (whose charms, I fear, elude me), but it is not just because Eliot is such a brilliant writer, or because she is so deftly political, but because she could be such an expert guide to a life lived both conventionally and very much on the margins.

3. What books are currently on your bedside table?

I was looking at that cluttered table and am a bit embarrassed by how many are there. The books on my nightstand are both reproaches and thrilling invitations. In no particular order (you can imagine the stack):

Read Full Post »

As part of our mission to promote authors, the joy of reading, and to better understand the craft of writing, we’ve paired with the The Norwich Bookstore in Norwich, Vermont to present an ongoing series entitled “3 Questions”.  In it, we pose three questions to authors with upcoming visits to the bookstore.  Their responses are posted on The Book Jam during the days leading up to their engagement.  Our hope is that this exchange will offer insight into their work and will encourage readers to attend these special author events and read their books.

Helen Peppe, author of Pigs Can't Swim

This post features Helen Peppe author of Pigs Can’t Swima writer and photographer’s wry but poignant account of her hardscrabble childhood and adolescence in rural New England. Honest yet humorous in its depiction of family dysfunction, Peppe’s book is a celebration of difference, resilience and the healing power of love.

Ms. Peppe’s photography and written work have received numerous awards and recognition, including placing first in the 2009 Word Worth Essay and Fiction Contest, and The Starving Writer Literary contest twice. She was one of seven finalists for the 2011 Annie Dillard Creative Nonfiction Award, as well as a Maine Literary Awards repeat finalist. Earlier, she focused primarily on writing for equine publications, homeschooling her children, teaching creative writing, and running her husband’s business. In 2009, she earned an M.F.A. in creative writing from the University of Southern Maine. She lives with her husband, children, dogs and horses in the Portland area.

Ms. Peppe will appear at the Norwich Bookstore at 7 pm on Wednesday, March 12th to discuss Pigs Can’t Swimand her life on a farm in New England. Reservations are recommended. Call 802-649-1114 or email info@norwichbookstore.com to reserve your seat.

Product Details

 

1) What three books have helped shape you into the author you are today, and why?

  • Bleak House by Charles Dickens because of his sense of humor, use of irony, and for his compelling characterizations.
  • Fire Starter by Stephen King because of his story telling, his pacing, and his gift for entertaining and delighting.
  • In the Shadow of Man by Jane Goodall because of her honesty and love of animals based not for what they can do for her, but on what she can do for  them.

2) What author (living or dead) would you most like to have a cup of coffee with and why?

Jane Goodall because she decided what she wanted to do and she did it despite naysayers. She is a legend and knows more about human nature than most psychologists through her study of primates. Her temple is the jungle, her love for what lives in the jungle is unshakeable, her determination to protect the jungle, its inhabitants, and all of Earth’s resources is unflagging. Her honesty and generosity inspire me as a writer and animal advocate.

3) What books are currently on your bedside table?

Read Full Post »

As part of our mission to promote authors, the joy of reading, and to better understand the craft of writing, we’ve paired with the The Norwich Bookstore in Norwich, Vermont to present an ongoing series entitled “3 Questions”.  In it, we pose three questions to authors with upcoming visits to the bookstore.  Their responses are posted on The Book Jam during the days leading up to their engagement.  Our hope is that this exchange will offer insight into their work and will encourage readers to attend these special author events and read their books.

This post we feature Tracey Campbell Pearson, author of Elephant’s Story and other picture books such as Bob and Myrtle. Ms. Pearson studied at Syracuse University and the Parsons School of Design in NYC. She has lived in Cleveland, New York City and Connecticut, among other places, but now makes her home in Vermont.

Ms. Pearson will appear at the Norwich Public Library between 1 and 3 pm on Saturday, February 8th as part of a Second Saturdays, a new collaboration between the library and the Norwich Bookstore to highlight great books for children.  Saturday’s event will offer fun Valentine’s Day related art projects and an introduction to her latest book Elephant’s Story. 

Reservations are not needed this time.  Just stop by to meet Ms. Pearson and make some Valentines crafts.  Call 802-649-1114 or email info@norwichbookstore.com with any questions or to reserve your book.  AGAIN – this event is at the LIBRARY.

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1.What three books have helped shape you into the author you are today, and why?

1.  The Beast and Monsieur Racine by Tomi Ungerer. This is the book that made me want to make picture books. Tomi pushes the envelope with his humor while leaving us with the kind and gentle Monsieur Racine. A perfect balance of salty and sweet. I was introduced to Tomi’s work while I was studying with Maurice Sendak in NYC in the ’70’s.
2.  Fish for Supper by MB Goffstein takes the picture book down to it’s simplest form but can still be read again and again. A lovely book.
3.  Any collection of *Mother Goose poems. I have many.  I Saw Esau by Iona and Peter Opie with Maurice Sendak‘s illustrations is a favorite.  * I can go on forever about how children need their Mother Goose!!

2.What author (living or dead) would you most like to have a cup of coffee with and why?

Mr. Edward Lear.  Why?  Well…He answers the question himself below…

How pleasant to know Mr. Lear

How pleasant to know Mr. Lear,
Who has written such volumes of stuff.
Some think him ill-tempered and queer,
But a few find him pleasant enough.

His mind is concrete and fastidious,
His nose is remarkably big;
His visage is more or less hideous,
His beard it resembles a wig.

He has ears, and two eyes, and ten fingers,
(Leastways if you reckon two thumbs);
He used to be one of the singers,
But now he is one of the dumbs.

He sits in a beautiful parlour,
With hundreds of books on the wall;
He drinks a great deal of marsala,
But never gets tipsy at all.

He has many friends, laymen and clerical,
Old Foss is the name of his cat;
His body is perfectly spherical,
He weareth a runcible hat.

When he walks in waterproof white,
The children run after him so!
Calling out, “He’s gone out in his night-
Gown, that crazy old Englishman, oh!”

He weeps by the side of the ocean,
He weeps on the top of the hill;
He purchases pancakes and lotion,
And chocolate shrimps from the mill.

He reads, but he does not speak, Spanish,
He cannot abide ginger beer;
Ere the days of his pilgrimage vanish,
How pleasant to know Mr. Lear!

3. What books are currently on your bedside table?
I have book “piles” on my bedside table. I just started The Luminaries by Eleanor Catton. It’s delicious.   It’s a big book to travel with so on my most recent trip I packed a Donna Leon mystery and Alice Munro’s short stories.
You didn’t ask about the books “under my bed”. This is where I keep a pile of heavy art books.  No room on the “bedside table” but plenty of room on the “bedside floor”.  My sister just sent me a Sendak book for my birthday. It is lovely.

Read Full Post »

As part of our mission to promote authors, the joy of reading, and to better understand the craft of writing, we’ve paired with the The Norwich Bookstore in Norwich, Vermont to present an ongoing series entitled “3 Questions”.  In it, we pose three questions to authors with upcoming visits to the bookstore.  Their responses are posted on The Book Jam during the days leading up to their engagement.  Our hope is that this exchange will offer insight into their work and will encourage readers to attend these special author events and read their books.

n dawidoff

Since we were just given the last minute opportunity to feature an exciting author, we are inserting a bonus post this month featuring Nicholas Dawidoff, author of Collision Low Crossers: A Year inside the Turbulent World of NFL Football, among other works.  (This book was extremely well reviewed by  for the New York Times last month.)  Mr. Dawidoff also writes for The New Yorker and has been a Guggenheim, Civitella Ranieri and Anschutz distinguished fellow.  He lives with his wife and son in Brooklyn.

Mr. Dawidoff will appear at the Norwich Bookstore at 7 pm on Wednesday, January 22nd to discuss Collision Low Crossers.  As part of his research, for an entire year he lived with the New York Jets, from early-morning quarterback meetings to edgy late-night conversations. He had a security code, a locker, and a desk in the scouting department.  As a special treat during his Norwich Bookstore visit, Mr. Dawidoff will be joined by Tom Powers, his friend and mentor, who will interview him on the process of investigative reporting for this book and how he was able to gain access to the Jets.

Reservations are recommended. Call 802-649-1114 or email info@norwichbookstore.com to reserve your seat.

1.What three books have helped shape you into the author you are today, and why?

Most of every NFL game is “played” during the week in private team facilities where coaches create and then teach the game plan to their players. These game plans are complex and remain forever secret outside the team, so the essence of the sport is inaccessible to those who watch it.  Furthermore, the game as played live is so fast that the nuances are difficult to follow.  That players wear masks is one of many more features of the sport that has created a distancing effect.  Football is now the single most popular entertainment in America, and yet those who watch it don’t really see it.  These are also among the reasons that football, in contrast to the more intimate sport of baseball, has always been a challenging subject for writers.  By all but living with an NFL team, I hoped to bring people who liked football–and people who might–closer to this big, mysterious public spectacle.

As I just wrote in the latest of the weekly New Yorker essays about football that I’ve been contributing to the magazine leading up to the Super Bowl, the most insightful books about the game are not really football books per se.

  • A football team has many familial elements (surrogate) and so Ian Frazier’s wonderful study of America through the prism of his own forebears, Family, was often on my mind as I wrote.
  • Planning a football game is an immersive, time-consuming, often-frustrating creative act, and the book that most captures the experiences of those game-planning NFL coaches I knew as they sought to build something they considered tactically beautiful was James Lord’s account of having his likeness painted by one of the world’s great artists–A Giacometti Portrait.
  • Finally, John Williams’ vivid study of buffalo hunters on the Kansas and Colorado prairies, Butcher’s Crossingis a classic American novel that captures many qualities of football from the earned intuition necessary to master an arduous and risky landscape to the book’s penetrating reflections on the nature of profound failure.
  • When I began my project, the consensus would be that the best football book ever written was George Plimpton’s Paper Lion, which came out fifty years ago.  Paper Lion remains a timeless book because it teems with portraits of interesting people who are placed in tension-filled and often very funny moments of narrative conflict.    

Samuel Johnson by Joshua Reynolds.jpg2.What author (living or dead) would you most like to have a cup of coffee with and why?

So many!  Who wouldn’t want to pun with Shakespeare (and once and for all prove that he alone did it all?!)  Who wouldn’t want to share, well, tea, with Virginia Woolf (and tell her, in the most deferential way, that all was not lost, she’d soon mean so much to many readers, perhaps especially women like my own mother.)  Coffee in a thermos aboard a river raft with Twain? (Tom Sawyer remains among my favorite books.)  Coffee (with a little snort of bourbon splashed in) with Faulkner?  How to decide? Okay! I choose Samuel Johnson in an eighteenth century London coffeehouse. Not only was he the greatest non-fiction prose writer of his time, he remains (because of Boswell’s Life of Johnson) literature’s peerless conversationalist. And there’s even slim possibility that this most humane of writers would enjoy it.  As he said, “If a man does not make new acquaintances as he advances through life, he will soon find himself alone.

3. What books are currently on your bedside table?

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