Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Norwich Bookstore’

As part of our mission to promote authors, the joy of reading, and to better understand the craft of writing, we’ve paired with the The Norwich Bookstore in Norwich, Vermont to present an ongoing series entitled “3 Questions”.  In it, we pose three questions to authors with upcoming visits to the bookstore.  Their responses are posted on The Book Jam during the week leading up to their engagement.  Our hope is that this exchange will offer insight into their work and will encourage readers to attend these special author events.

We are breaking our tradition of not posting in August because we are excited to again welcome author and friend Lizi Boyd for the debut of her latest work, an enchanting picture book called Flashlight.

Ms. Boyd has written and illustrated many children’s books including the critically acclaimed Inside Outside, but her talent doesn’t stop with books. She also creates other art such as the papers and stationery — all available for purchase from the Norwich Bookstore. She is our first repeat author, so it was fun to see how her answers differ this time around.  (When we return in autumn, we will debut three new questions for this series.)

Ms. Boyd will appear in her Norwich studio from 5 to 7 pm on Friday, August 15 to celebrate the publication of Flashlight.  (Click here for directions.) While the book is geared to preschoolers, all ages will enjoy Flashlight, and all are welcome during this special studio event.  While you wait to visit her studio, be sure to click here to watch Flashlight‘s movie trailer.

Because this event is not at the Bookstore, reservations are not required, but an RSVP is appreciated. When you call (802) 649-1114 to RSVP, you may also pre-order your signed copy of Flashlight

1. What three books have helped shape you into the author you are today, and why?

The Mouse Who Liked to Read in Bed by Miriam Clark Potter and Zenas Potter. I just found my ratty little copy from 1958. I wasn’t reading yet, but I vividly remember the first PG w/ black and white illustration: “Scuffie was a little field mouse with bright brown eyes. He liked to read in bed. He had a tiny table made of an empty spool. He had found that in a wastebasket. By his bed was a pink birthday candle. That was his reading light. One day, in an old doll house, way up in the farm house attic, he had run across a wee, wee quilt. He had dragged that home, for a bedcover. And his bed! He had fixed up a tiny four-poster, with a candy box, and some stubby pencils”. This little book influenced not only a desire to make drawings and stories out of the littlest bits of ideas but also must have given me my big love of being cozy in bed with a pile of books. (NOTE: Sadly, this book is now out of print.)

So of course, Maurice Sendak, who illustrated a A Kiss for Little Bear by Else Holmelund Minarik (a friend of my mothers, which I just discovered via an inscription, along with my mothers notes of her phone number and address). Also, Leo Lionni and little books by Hockney and the list could go on and on.

2. What author (living or dead) would you most like to have a cup of coffee with and why? 

I’ve been waiting since last year when I answered this question, and it’s still tea with Ursula Nordstrom. She was a brilliant editor who worked with absolutely everyone mid-century and changed the world of “children’s books”.

3. What books are currently on your bedside table?

The three books reside by my bed. I just finished The Stories by Jane Gardam, meeting all sorts of old and new characters, and really meeting them because Ms. Gardam gives that to the reader.  Quiet Dell by Jayne Anne Phillips which I’ve just dipped into. And, Euphoria by Lily King, which is waiting for me.

Read Full Post »

As part of our mission to promote authors, the joy of reading, and to better understand the craft of writing, we’ve paired with the The Norwich Bookstore in Norwich, Vermont to present an ongoing series entitled “3 Questions”.

v fish

In it, we pose three questions to authors with upcoming visits to the bookstore. Their responses are posted on The Book Jam during the days leading up to their engagement. Our hope is that this exchange will offer insight into their work and will encourage readers to both attend these special author events and read their books.

vf cover

Today, we feature Victoria Fish author of A Brief Moment of Weightlessness, a collection of short stories. In addition to writing short stories, and blogging about life, Ms. Fish is pursuing her Masters of Social Work. Her stories have appeared in numerous literary magazines, including Hunger Mountain, Slow Trains, Wild River Review, and Literary Mama. She lives with her husband and three boys in our hometown in Vermont. A Brief Moment of Weightlessness is her first published book.

Ms. Fish will appear at the Norwich Bookstore at 7 pm on Wednesday, June 25th to discuss her book and her work. Reservations are recommended. Call 802-649-1114 or email info@norwichbookstore.com to reserve your seat. We have heard it is close to “selling out” so call soon.

 

1. What three books have helped shape you into the author you are today, and why?

The Summer of My German Soldier, by Bette Green. My Antonia, by Willa Cather. Angle of Repose, by Wallace Stegner.  All three of these books took me beyond my known world, while at the same time, almost miraculously, connected me with my own experiences of joy and wonder and loss. Books like these that both create a sense of yearning and a sense of finding make me want to write.

2. What author (living or dead) would you most like to have a cup of coffee with and why?

Mary Ladd Gavell, the author of I Cannot Tell A Lie Exactly.  Gavell died at the age of 47, having only published one story. That story, posthumously, was chosen by John Updike as one of the Best Short Stories of the Century, and, after that her children published a book of her stories. She writes about motherhood (and other topics) with understated poignancy, honesty and wit. There is one story called “The Swing” about a mother who imagines that her son, now in his 30’s, visits the backyard at night as a 6 year old boy again. I cannot get through that story without crying, every time, sideswiped anew with how she writes with such simplicity and power about intangible loss. I want to ask her, how did she do it? What else would she have written if she hadn’t died?

3. What books are currently on your bedside table?

Mrs. Somebody Somebody, stories by Tracy Winn. Runaway, stories by Alice Munro. Red Bird: Poems, poems by Mary Oliver. I have read all three, but I always keep a few books like this to dip into again and again, words I know will satisfy me.

 

Read Full Post »

Last week, on a GORGEOUS Spring evening that actually felt like summer (being Vermonters some of us were melting in the 78 degree heat), readers from Norwich, Vermont and surrounding towns gathered in The Norwich Inn Pub to hear about some superb new books to bring to the mountains this summer, and to give to grads and dads later this month.

The evening was the latest outing of the Book Jam’s live event – “Pages in the Pub”.  This event is designed to bring together independent booksellers, literary bloggers, educators, librarians, and book lovers for an evening of talking about great titles.

 beer & book

This event sold out, but those people lucky enough to get a ticket sipped drinks, listened to great book reviews and laughed a bit.  We focused on GREAT books for summer reading because summer is just around the corner, and great gifts for grads and dads because those celebrations are upon us. Because of everyone’s efforts, a few people completed their father’s day shopping during the event, and most got a good start on stocking up on great summer reading.  We also raised over $700 for the library, all while increasing sales for a treasured independent bookstore – The Norwich Bookstore of Norwich, Vermont.

Our SUPERB presenters included (and we truly thank them for their time and talent):

  • Beth Reynolds - Beth is the children’s librarian at the Norwich Public Library during the week and dons her bookseller cap on the weekends at the Norwich Bookstore where she has helped many a family find the perfect last-minute birthday present. When not working in town you can find her at home knitting, reading, baking, writing or taking pictures of her new lop-earred bunny.
  • Carin Pratt – Carin moved to the Upper Valley three years ago after spending 30 years in DC working as a television producer. She’s never looked back. She reads a lot.
  • Penny McConnel – Penny is the co owner of The Norwich Bookstore. She lives in Norwich with husband Jim and enjoys gardening, reading, studying Italian, cooking, knitting, visiting her three sons and a grandson in Phoenix, the Bay Area and Burgundy France, and best of all, doing things with Jim.
  • Jim Gold – Our first male presenter in Norwich says — “Reading has given me the quiet eye and understanding heart to see beyond the confines of my dental profession. It fosters good conversation. Other activities that feed my soul:  hiking, cycling, canoeing, gardening, woodturning, cooking and time with my favorite and far more experienced book seller, Penny McConnel.”
  • Lisa Christie – Lisa is, among other things, the co-founder of the Book Jam and a nonprofit consultant. One of her best jobs was being the founder of Everybody Wins! Vermont, a statewide literacy organization.  In her spare time she reads (though never as much as she would like), bikes, swims and has fun with her husband and two sons.

Since most of you could not join us in person, we now share the great titles discussed last week. This post lists all twenty-one books discussed during the evening (Beth somehow snuck in an extra title), each with its special six-word review written by the presenter. Each of their selections is linked to The Norwich Bookstore web site where you can learn more about the picks and order your books. You’ll also notice that the selections are divided into rather specific categories to make browsing easier.  Have fun looking, and enjoy getting a head start on your summer of great reading.

Non-fiction or reference book – For people who like to ponder large tomes during summer vacation

  • Summertime by Joanne Dugan (2014). Selected by Beth – Photos you’ll want to jump inside.
  • My Venice by Donna Leon (2013). Selected by Jim – Poignant. Insightful. Clever. Observant. Witty. No BS.

Cookbooks – For anyone looking for summer inspiration

Memoirs – For people who enjoy living vicariously through other people’s memories

  • My Beloved World by Sonya Sotomayor (2013). Selected by Penny – Inspiring. Hopeful. Insightful. Educational. Fantastic story.

Adult Fiction – For a woman who only has time for the best fiction after hiking all day

  • Shotgun Lovesongs by Nickolas Butler (2014). Selected by Carin – Thirty-somethings navigate small town lIfe.
  • While Beauty Slept by Elizabeth Blackwell (2014). Selected by Lisa – “True” story of “Sleeping Beauty”. Fun.
  • We Are Called to Rise by Laura McBride (2014). Selected by Beth – It’s all about connections. And love.
  • The Orchardist by Amanda Coplin (2012). Selected by Jim – Excellent character development carries moving tale.
  • And The Dark Sacred Night by Julia Glass (2014). Selected by Penny – Searching can bring you home again.

 

Adult fiction – For a man who has enough camping equipment, but not enough good fiction

Books for summer campers/ young readers in Tree-houses (ages 8-12) – books for those beyond tonka trucks and tea parties but not yet ready for teen topics.

  • Capture the Flag by Kate Messner (2012). Selected by Lisa – Series. Art. History. Fun. Smart kids.

Books for your favorite High Schooler – “not required” reading for teens to ponder during the long hours of summer vacation

  • The Magicians by Lev Grossman (2009). Selected by Beth – Imagine Harry Potter going to college.
  • We Were Liars by E. Lockhart (2014). Selected by Lisa – Charmed Island Life? Tragic Choices.  OK?

PERFECT books for the dads and grads in your life – or stated another way, last minute gifts to ensure happy celebrations

A brief note to our valued readers — While we are not Goodreads, we are trying to grow and show that small independent bloggers and bookstores make a difference.  So this June, we are campaigning to increase our subscribers.

Please subscribe if you have not already done so.  And if you are a subscriber, please encourage your fellow readers to subscribe to the Book Jam.  To subscribe, go to the right hand side of our blog – under email subscription – and provide your email. THANK YOU!

 

 

 

Read Full Post »

May brings Children’s Book Week, and The Book Jam failed to celebrate on time. However, since we believe in reading and honoring children’s books year round, we are extending the weekly celebration by highlighting a few of our favorite 2014 picture books (at least so far).  And, since the combination of illustrations and writing is key to this genre, we would like to point out that by coincidence, in each of our picks, the author and the illustrator are the same person.

The Girl and the Green Bicycle written and illustrated by Mark Peck (2014) – A lovely, lovely book, with enchanting pictures that wonderfully illustrate the virtues of love, hard work, and making the best of a situation. And, it does so without preaching. Prior to posting, we showed this to a few customers in the Norwich Bookstore and they were all a bit teary while they read.

This wordless picture book tells a moving story of a girl who wants a green bicycle she spots in a store window. When her piggy bank does not hold enough to purchase it immediately, she sets about to earn the necessary funds. Then, just when she earns enough to purchase the bike, it is gone.  Does she wallow?  Does she pout?  Nope – she uses her money to buy something for her brother instead.  Is she rewarded?  YES!  But, we will make you read it to discover the nature of this reward. Enjoy this yourself and then give to many others. (After reading this we discovered Mr. Peck also wrote and illustrated The Boy and The Airplane, and that the characters from that first book are subtle plot devices in this one.) ~ Lisa Christie

Two Speckled Eggs written and illustrated by Jennifer K. Mann (2014) – A great story for anyone who has ever been the odd person out. It uses a girl’s birthday party to show how hard being a friend can be, and how the “in” crowd is not always all it is cracked up to be. To sum, Ginger’s mom makes her invite ALL the girls in her class to her party, including Lyla Browning, who smells like old leaves and once brought a tarantula to school. Then, during the party, some of the girls change the rules to the games making Ginger feel badly, and no one likes her birthday cake — except Lyla. By the time Lyla gives Ginger her present, Ginger wonders, is “being different really such a bad thing?”. ~ Lisa Christie


How to Cheer Up Dad
 written and illustrate by Fred Koehler (2014) – A hilarious book that reverses the parent and child relationships, and makes you realize your kids really do have the power to make you feel better. In this tale, an elephant just can’t understand why his dad is having such a bad day. It couldn’t be the raisins he spit out at the ceiling or the bath he refused to take. Luckily, he has a plan to turn Dad’s day around —  doing some of his dad’s (wink wink) favorite things. HINT – This is perfect for Father’s Day. ~ Lisa Christie

 

BONUS — for children who are a little bit older — The WHO WAS…? WHAT WAS …? SERIES

Thanks to Liza at the Norwich Bookstore, my son discovered this series as a 2nd grader. He loved them so much he would ask for extra chores to earn money to purchase the new titles.  Each book in the series focuses on a specific personality or event in history. Some – Bill Gates, JK Rowling – feature people who are still living among us, but most do not. Each book has goofy illustrations that make the topic seem less daunting. But, the material is interesting enough to keep older elementary school (3rd-5th grade) kids interested. Pick one and enjoy getting hooked. ~ Lisa Christie

Read Full Post »

As part of our mission to promote authors, the joy of reading, and to better understand the craft of writing, we’ve paired with the The Norwich Bookstore in Norwich, Vermont to present an ongoing series entitled “3 Questions”.  In it, we pose three questions to authors with upcoming visits to the bookstore. Their responses are posted on The Book Jam during the days leading up to their engagement. Our hope is that this exchange will offer insight into their work and will encourage readers to both attend these special author events and read their books.

Today, we feature Jennifer Senior author of All Joy and No Fun: The Paradox of Modern Parenting.  She is a contributing editor at New York Magazine, where she writes profiles and cover stories about politics, social science and mental health. She is the recipient of numerous awards for her journalism, and graduated summa cum laude from Princeton in 1991.  All Joy and No Fun is her first book. To preview her visit to Norwich, you may wish to watch her recent TED talk.

Ms. Senior will appear at the Norwich Bookstore at 7 pm on Wednesday, May 21st to discuss her book and her work. Reservations are recommended. Call 802-649-1114 or email info@norwichbookstore.com to reserve your seat.

1. What three books have helped shape you into the author you are today, and why? 

I think Arlie Hochschild’s The Second Shift and Oliver Sacks An Anthropologist on Mars (or any of Sacks’ books, for that matter) both showed me how beguiling case studies could be, and how important they are to make narrative nonfiction come alive when you’re juggling tons of data; otherwise, your writing becomes a plague of statistics and citations. The writing of Michael Chabon (The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay and The Yiddish Policemen’s Union especially, but really, all of it) and Richard Russo (The Risk Pool and Empire Falls especially, but again, all of it) taught me how important it is to love and feel compassion for your characters (I only profiled families I really liked for All Joy and No Fun.) And like many women, I went through a huge Jane Austen phase in college, and tried to write just like her.

 

2. What author (living or dead) would you most like to have a cup of coffee with and why?

Anthony Trollope. He was so impossibly prolific, and he wrote like an angel, and his range was staggering, and he did it all WHILE HOLDING DOWN A DAY JOB.

3. What books are currently on your bedside table?

Bridge of Sighs, by Richard Russo (one of the only books of his I haven’t read); S, by Doug Dorst; The Story of the Human Body: Evolution, Health, and Disease by Daniel Lieberman; a galley of The Big Fat Surpriseby Nina Teicholz.

 

Read Full Post »

Since in the very near future many, many people across the USA are heading to airports and getting in cars for April school vacations or for Seder and Easter dinners, we thought we would highlight a few great audio books for you to listen to during those long car rides, or to download to your devices for those plane trips. And since one of us always has young children in the mini-van making adult audio fare impractical for her, and the other Lisa’s work commute is too short for audio books these days, we also asked for help from two of our great local booksellers when we searched for audio-books intended for mostly adult audiences.

No matter where the road takes you, we truly hope you enjoy these picks. And yes, each of these picks is good in the printed form as well.

And, if you do not have a reason to listen to children’s literature, please skip to the end where there are picks just for you.

For families with pre-schoolers to 2nd graders in the car

Magic Tree House Series, by Mary Pope Osborne (assorted years) – Seriously, the phrases “Magic Tree House”, or “Jack and Annie”, are magic to the preschool set. These words are all you need to know to entertain pre-schoolers for hours. We promise. We have recommended these to hundreds of parents and grandparents and have yet to receive a complaint. OK we have heard one – the author, at a book a year, does not write and record fast enough. So now a synopsis of what causes all the fuss. In this series, siblings, named Jack and Annie, time travel in a magic treehouse that appears periodically in the woods near their home. While listening to these books, your kids learn a bit about all sorts of historical times and people, all while thinking they are part of an amazing adventure. You, as the adults in the car, get to know your children will not ask “are we there yet” as long as the audio-book is running. Bonus: The written versions make great early chapter books for emerging readers. ~ Lisa Christie and Lisa Cadow

For families with elementary school aged children in tow (depending upon the kids, probably best for 2nd grade and up)

Same Sun Here by Silas HouseNeela VaswaniHilary Schenker (2012) – An interesting audio book with alternating narrators reading alternating chapters telling the story of two pen pals — one in NYC and one in rural KY — and the adventures they share via printed page and letters mailed through the US Postal service. Bonus: We know it is shocking that they used pen and paper even though email was available (the novel is set just after 9-11), but maybe you can discuss how you survived the “Olden Days” before email as you listen with children. ~ Lisa Christie


Frindle (1996) or No Talking (2007) by Andrew Clements – Mr. Clements is a former elementary school teacher and principal who truly seems to understand kids, and seems to have a special place in his heart for young troublemakers. Both of these books take place in a contemporary school setting where students cause a bit of a mess for themselves and/or the adults in their lives. Listen and enjoy the humor of elementary school aged students and the adults who work with them. Bonus: If you like these books, Mr. Clements has written many, many more, and someone has recorded them all for you to hear. ~ Lisa Christie

For families needing a good book to appeal to kids in 3rd to 12th grade

The Hobbit (1937) or The Lord of the Rings Trilogy (1954) by JRR Tolkein - The “oh so British” narrator is superb. The content is both interesting enough for the teens in your car and adventurous enough for the elementary school aged. And since the only visuals are in their head, the plot is not too scary for most upper elementary aged kids. Bonus: You can cross some “classics” off your high schooler’s college prep reading lists. ~ Lisa Cadow and Lisa Christie

For families with teens and above

Dreams from My Father: A Story of Race and Inheritance by Barack Obama (2003) – The US President won a grammy for his reading of his autobiography.  You will win greater knowledge of his life. Pre-teens and teens can relate to his story of how hard his mother made him work at school.  Parents can ponder his comments about how parenting with his wife Michelle caused him to think hard about divisions of labor in households and the chores that typically fall on women, whether they work outside the home or not. Listen and have fun road-tripping with the President in your ear. ~ Lisa Cadow and Lisa Christie

Lucky Man by Michael J. Fox (2002) – Yes, this choice may seem cheesy at first glance, but his life is full of ups and downs that make great stories (alcoholism, stardom, Parkinson’s). The book is well-written and funny. Yes, we said well-written; and yes, he admits he got some advice from his brother-in-law Michael Pollan. Bonus: Honestly, having his voice in your car is like a lovely conversation with a long lost friend or an intense introduction to someone you would like to know. ~ Lisa Christie

For times when mostly adults are listening


NOTE: These next choices are picked by our friends Liza Bernard and Carin Pratt of the Norwich Bookstore. Both have a long enough commutes to listen to numerous audio-books.

One Summer: America 1927 by Bill Bryson and read by Bill Bryson (2013) – Humorist Bill Bryson, tackles the events of 1927 in his latest book. The players include Charles Lindbergh, Babe Ruth, Al Capone. The New York Times review declares this book “a wonderful romp.” Carin’s review of the audio-book, “well done”. ~ picked by Carin 

A Constellation of Vital Phenomena by Anthony Marra (2013) – Carin says, this novel is “one of the best I have read this year. And, the audio version is well read.”  Both Lisas of the Book Jam loved this book about the Chechnya Conflict as well, and will review it in a post soon. ~ Picked by Carin

The Testament of Mary by Colm Toibon (2013) – Katie Kitchel, another great Norwich Bookstore Bookseller, picked this novel as her staff pick recently.  To quote her – “Don’t let the slim size of this novel deceive you. It is full of haunting questions, powerful imagery, and the emotion of a mother who has lost a son. This novel seeks to remind us, that first and foremost, Mary was a mother.” Liza is now recommending the audio-book. Since it is read by Meryl Streep, we have no trouble imagining why. ~ Picked by Liza

Department Q Detective series by Jussi Adler-Olsen (assorted dates) – We have sung the praises of this Danish series in its written form. Now Carin, a very well-read woman, has told us they are delightful in their audio-book form, especially the voice of Assad, the main detective’s trusted assistant. ~ Picked by Carin

Jack Reacher Mysteries by Lee Childs (assorted dates) – “Fun, well-plotted mysteries that are well narrated in the audio form.”  Never Go Back is most recent. ~ Picked by Liza

Read Full Post »

As part of our mission to promote authors, the joy of reading, and to better understand the craft of writing, we’ve paired with the The Norwich Bookstore in Norwich, Vermont to present an ongoing series entitled “3 Questions”.  In it, we pose three questions to authors with upcoming visits to the bookstore.  Their responses are posted on The Book Jam during the days leading up to their engagement.  Our hope is that this exchange will offer insight into their work and will encourage readers to attend these special author events and read their books.

This post features Marianne Szegedy-Maszak author of I Kiss Your Hands: Hearts, Souls, and Wars in Hungary, her first book.  Ms. Szegedy-Maszak’s journalism career has spanned over twenty-five years and has included covering the collapse of communism, the Republican Revolution, 9/11 and social policy for the New York Times Magazine, Esquire, Harpers Bazaar, and many more.

Ms. Szegedy-Maszak will appear at the Norwich Bookstore at 7 pm on Wednesday, April 9th to discuss her work. Reservations are recommended. Call 802-649-1114 or email info@norwichbookstore.com to reserve your seat.

1. What three books have helped shape you into the author you are today, and why? 

Always difficult to narrow things down to threes, when there is such a rich and wonderful collection of influences. One of the first and most influential books for me was Nixon Agonistes by Garry Wills. It was a book that grew out of his brilliant coverage in Esquire of Nixon’s campaign and I was a senior in high school when I read it and at that moment knew I wanted to be a journalist. The depth of insight, the richness of his writing, and the way he brought his formidable intellect to bear on covering this tragic president– before Watergate– was astonishing.

I remember reading Speak Memory by Nabokov, a memoir of his life in Czarist Russia right at the twilight of an era, with a little notebook and every once in a while I would just copy a sentence or a phrase. The details and the fluidity of memory that he captured by focusing on the most minute, superficially trivial details taught me that in memoir, it is so often about the trees, not the forest.

My Antonia by Willa Cather is a book that always brings a little lump in my throat when I think about it. Cather wrote with such astonishing simplicity in the voice of a young man, a slightly unreliable narrator, who nonetheless kept me suspended between his internal life and the world all around him. She had such total confidence as a writer, every word rings true, nothing is extraneous from physical to emotional details. After the more rococo prose of Wills and Nabokov, Cather is the cool drink of water.

2. What author (living or dead) would you most like to have a cup of coffee with and why?

I struggled to avoid being a Rebecca Mead copy-cat, but unfortunately I have to admit, that I would love to have a cup of coffee (or perhaps tea, or perhaps a good strong drink) with Mary Ann Evans, also known as George Eliot.  I loved Middlemarch, of course, always preferred her to Jane Austen (whose charms, I fear, elude me), but it is not just because Eliot is such a brilliant writer, or because she is so deftly political, but because she could be such an expert guide to a life lived both conventionally and very much on the margins.

3. What books are currently on your bedside table?

I was looking at that cluttered table and am a bit embarrassed by how many are there. The books on my nightstand are both reproaches and thrilling invitations. In no particular order (you can imagine the stack):

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 474 other followers