Feeds:
Posts
Comments

This week’s “3 Questions” features Christopher Wren, author of  many books and articles including his latest history — Those Turbulent Sons of Freedom: Ethan Allen’s Green Mountain Boys and the American Revolution.

wren_christopher.jpg

Mr. Wren retired from The New York Times after nearly twenty-nine years as a reporter, foreign correspondent, and editor. He headed the Times‘ news bureaus in Moscow, Cairo, Beijing, Ottawa, and Johannesburg; covered the United Nations; and reported from the former Soviet Union, Eastern Europe, the Balkans, the Middle East, China, Southeast Asia, Africa, South America, and Canada. He is a visiting professor in Dartmouth’s Master of Arts in Liberal Studies program. He currently lives in Vermont with his wife.

FC9781416599555.jpg

Mr. Wren will appear at the Norwich Bookstore at 7 pm on Wednesday, May 30th. This event is free and open to the public. However, reservations are recommended as space is limited. Please call 802-649-1114 or email info@norwichbookstore.com to save a seat and/or secure your autographed copy of Those Turbulent Sons of Freedom: Ethan Allen’s Green Mountain Boys and the American Revolution.

FC9780143108276.jpgFC9780140296402.jpgFC9781439195260.jpg

1.What three books have helped shape you into the writer you are today, and why?

It was actually 40 years as a journalist on deadline that shaped me as a writer. I also read authors in the countries where I worked, like Bulgakov’s Master and Margarita, and J.M Coetzee’s Disgrace. Bedtime reads like Lonesome Dove by Larry McMurtry and everything by John Cheever, plus lots of poetry from Alfred Tennyson to W.B. Yeats, Alan Seeger and Billy Collins.

download-1.jpgdownload.jpg

2.What author (living or dead) would you most like to have a cup of coffee with and why?

I’d prefer to have tea with Jane Austen to discuss my favorite, Persuasion. Or the Spanish war correspondent-turned-novelist Arturo Perez-Reverte, who wrote Queen of the South, about international drug trafficking, which I covered as a journalist.

FC9780812977301.jpgFC9781250076229.jpgFC9781250092489.jpg

3.What books are currently on your bedside table?

Books on my bedside table include Arturo Perez-Reverte‘s novel The Painter of Battles, Being Mortal by Atul Gawande, and Enduring Vietnam by James Wright, the best book I’ve read about Vietnam vets.

As part of our mission to promote authors, the joy of reading, and to better understand the craft of writing, we’ve paired with the The Norwich Bookstore in Norwich, Vermont to present an ongoing series entitled “3 Questions”. In it, we pose three questions to authors with upcoming visits to the bookstore. Their responses are posted on The Book Jam during the days leading up to their engagement. Our hope is that this exchange will offer insight into their work and will encourage readers to attend these special author events and read their books.

Advertisements

download.jpg

So, Meghan Markle of the USA marries Prince Harry of the UK in six days. When Kate Middleton married Prince William, The Book Jam published a post reviewing books about princesses. For these royal nuptials, we thought we would highlight books that might help Ms. Markle as she assumes her new duties in the UK, figures out life in a new country, and orients to her new role.

FC9780380727506.jpgNotes From A Small Island by Bill Bryson (1998) – And sometimes as you adjust to new circumstances,  you just need humor and a good travel guide. Like Ms. Markle, Mr. Bryson also married a Brit and found his life forever changed. This book chronicles his final trip around Great Britain, which had been his home for over twenty years, before returning to the USA. We believe Ms. Markle might find it helpful as she adjust to life in the UK. And, we believe that Mr. Bryson’s humor is always welcome, even if she finds his perspective on the UK or being married to a Brit different from her own experiences. She could also read his In A Sunburned Country as prep for her first official trip Down Under as a Royal. And, we will close by saying again that Mr. Bryson knows how to make you laugh.

FC9781101911761.jpgWe Should All Be Feminists by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie (2014) – Ms. Markle is a self-proclaimed feminist. This gorgeous, concise long-essay-of-a-book might help her to articulate why as she travels the UK in her new role.  We envision her handing these books out like candy as she performs her new duties. Previously reviewed by us on our post entitled Beyond the Marches.

FC9781612370293.jpgLet’s Go London: Oxford and Cambridge (2013) by Harvard Student Agencies (2013) – Assuming she can ditch her security detail, this guide could help Ms. Markle find London’s top spots for those traveling on a restricted budget. Though we realize she has almost unlimited resources, if she wishes to remain in touch with the non-royals who inhabit this planet, we recommend this guide as a great way to find young travellers on limited budgets from all around the world. As another online review states — “Let’s Go Budget London is a budget traveler’s ticket to getting the most out of a trip to London—without breaking the bank… This slim, easy-to-carry guide is packed with dollar-saving information to help you make every penny count.” There is also one for Europe to help her escape on her on foreign trips. Either of these books would make great graduation gifts for those students lucky enough to have time and some money to travel.

FC9780143113553.jpgFC9780735212206.jpgExit West by Mohsin Hamid (2017) – or Strawberry Fields  (published as Two Caravans in the UK) by Marina Lewycka (2007) – Both these novels provide excellent ways to understand refugees – a cause that may benefit from some Royal Attention. Strawberry Fields/Two Caravans takes place in the English Countryside; so, it could count as a travel guide as well. These books were previously reviewed by us on Refugees, Immigrants, Syria, and Other Thoughts and Our 2016 Summer Reading List.

FC9781501166761.jpgAsymmetry by Lisa Halliday (2018) — We recommend Ms. Markle (and you) read Asymmetry. Why? well because, sometimes as you adjust to new circumstances you just need a good book. This first published novel by Ms. Halliday is just that – a quiet novel, written with gorgeous prose about interesting and distinct characters living their lives in New York, London, Iraq and elsewhere. Asymmetry explores the power of fiction – with excerpts from some of your favorite novels cleverly placed throughout. It also explores what happens in situations of inequity – a twenty-something in love with an older, well-established, and famous novelist (based upon the author’s actual life we gave heard), and an American man detained by immigration in London. The final section offers humor and some closure. While we honestly felt like Asymmetry was actually three loosely related but intelligently written short stories, instead of a coherent novel, this novel has us thinking about it days later which is never a bad thing. Don’t take our word for it though, The New York Times also gave it a lovely review. (The Times reviewer also said she read it three times, so maybe if we did the same coherence would grow apparent.)

FC9780811855518.jpgPorn for Women by The Cambridge Women’s Pornography Cooperative (2007) – It might be worth having a copy or two of this picture book hanging about Kensington Palace for her prince and her to review as they launch into married life. Previously reviewed by the Book Jam on Mother’s Day: Porn (men with vacuums) and Practical.

download-2.jpg

 

 

 

 

Mother's_Day_Cupcakes_(4592972238).jpg

Mother’s Day is on the horizon, and after some recent excellent reading, we feel the need to recommend some good books for gift giving. However, we have done this many times in the past, and don’t want to be too repetitive.

So instead, today we review some new books about motherhood that perhaps everyone should read in preparation for honoring – and remembering what it’s like to be – mothers.

All of these titles would make great gifts for the mothers in your life – they feature edgy, introspective, smart, honest, and fun writing. And, if you are still looking for more ideas for gifts, you can find some great titles in all our past reviews, including the ones where we tried to cultivate a specific list for mom’s day gifts.

Happy Mother’s Day to all!

Mothers-Day-Cupcake-Tutorial.jpg

FC9780062838742.jpgAmateur Hour: Motherhood in Essays and Swear Words by Kimberly Harrington (2018) – This collection of essays features a distinctive voice (one that is often seen in The New Yorker, and McSweeney’s) that applies humor, tears, cursing, love, and unique insight to almost every aspect of motherhood/life: a failed pregnancy, relocating across the country, a request to end “mommy wars” steeped with insight from both sides, grandparents/Florida, to do lists, meal-train etiquette, participation trophies, parenting experts, plane rides with kids, and partners. You will grin throughout this collection, as each essay is graced with humor and humility. You will tear-up a bit reading many of the essays as some are poignant and unsparing (e.g., a retelling of a failed pregnancy, and/or a story of a fight over divorcing – they didn’t – that uses FB “likes” to score points). Quick note: we found this book because one of its chapters was a recent Op-Ed in The New York Times.

My new short-term goal – to meet this author. Since we are both Vermonters, achieving it may be as simple as just driving the state asking who knows her; eventually, with this method, I will find her. So be forewarned Ms. Harrington, I may exhibit stalker like tendencies soon. But more likely, I will merely ask the fabulous booksellers at the Norwich Bookstore to let Ms. Harrington know she has a new fan. ~ Lisa Christie

FC9780316393843.jpgAnd Now We Have Everything: On Motherhood Before I Was Ready by Meaghan O’Connell (2018) – The catchy title of this new memoir immediately begs the question: “But is anyone ever ready for motherhood?” O’Connell initially thinks that she is, though her positive pregnancy test does come as a surprise to her and her fiance. With this book, she bravely charts her physical and emotional journey from single New York career woman-writer to the end of her first year with a toddler. Nothing is off limits: her pregnancy anxieties, a difficult labor, her maternal ambivalence, sex (or lack thereof) after delivery, “to daycare or not to daycare?”, or finding new, true mommy friends. In a nutshell, O’Connell describes the wonder-filled but very rocky road to becoming a family of three in a timeless yet contemporary way. Even as a mother with adult children, I fully related to her emotions – the raw, honest way that she writes made my own experiences feel close and fresh again.  I even found a tear of recognition rolling down my cheek in her final chapter. As soon as I finished, I ran out and purchased a copy for a friend who is newly pregnant. It is the perfect gift for new mothers.

We found our way to this book because it was featured in an excellent New York Times piece about recent books about motherhood. ~ Lisa Cadow

BONUS PICK

FC9780544002234.jpgAre You My Mother? by Alison Bechdel (2012) – One of us read this graphic novel years ago when it first published; one of us is in the midst of it now.  Thus, neither of us can review it in detail today. However, it immediately sprang to mind when we thought about this post. So, for today’s review, we will use the words of Jonathan Safran Froer, author of Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close and Everything is Illuminated,Are You My Mother is a work of the most humane kind of genius, bravely going right to the heart of things: why we are who we are. It’s also incredibly funny. And visually stunning. And page-turningly addictive. And heartbreaking.” We both found our way to this book because we are huge fans of Ms. Bechdel (note: a fellow Vermonter).

mom-1372466_960_720.jpg

HMltHRpM_400x400.jpg

This week’s “3 Questions” features Melanie Finn, author of The Underneath. This novel follows a journalist struggling with the constraints of motherhood. In an effort to disconnect from work and save her marriage, she rents a quaint Vermont farmhouse for the summer. The discovery of a mysterious crawlspace in the rental with unsettling writing etched into the wall, unfolds a plot exploring violence and family.

Ms. Finn‘s previous work has been met with critical acclaim. Her first novel, Away From You was published to international accolades. Her second novel, The Gloaming, was a New York Times Notable Book of 2016,  a finalist for the Vermont Book Award, and The Guardian‘s “Not the Booker” Prize. After living in Kenya, Connecticut, New York, and Tanzania, Ms. Finn currently lives in Vermont with her husband Matt (a wildlife film maker), their twin daughters, three Tanzanian mutts, and two very old horses.

FC9781937512699.jpg

Ms. Finn will appear at the Norwich Bookstore at 7 pm on Wednesday, May 16thThis event is free and open to the public. However, reservations are recommended as space is limited. Please call 802-649-1114 or email info@norwichbookstore.com to save a seat and/or secure your autographed copy of The Underneath. The novel goes on sale on May 15th, so you will be among the first to read it.

 

FC9780143107552.jpgFC9780142422571.jpgFC9780723247708.jpg

1.What three books have helped shape you into the writer you are today, and why?

Bruce Chatwin’s Songlines, because of his lean prose and because, when I was 21, he told me in a dream that I should become a writer (seriously!); The Power and The Glory by Graham Greene because of the torpid physical and emotional atmosphere Greene creates, and his deeply flawed characters; Beatrix Potter’s books, because she’s not afraid to use long words when speaking to children, because of her humor, because her characters are true to themselves, they’re completely authentic.

Bruce_Chatwin,_July_1982.jpg

2.What author (living or dead) would you most like to have a cup of coffee with and why?

Bruce Chatwin remains my major literary crush; he died in 1989 but I still dream of going for a long hike in obscure mountains with him – maybe Tibesti in southern Libya. He was interested is everything, anything – his books were so diverse in subject matter: he was an art expert, he walked through the Australian desert, he wrote about two brothers living on a remote farm in Wales and a slave trader in west Africa. There are many others – Margaret Atwood, Jane Smiley, Joan Didion, Willa Cather, Vladimir Nabokov, Ezra Pound, Philip Larkin, Graham Greene, Naguib Mahfouz – but, ooo, I’d be too scared of them. I mean, what do you say to Nabokov?

FC9780316434812.jpgFC9780374282134.jpgFC9781771642484.jpg

3.What books are currently on your bedside table?

Leni Zumas’ Red Clocks, Samantha Hunt’s The Dark Dark, and Peter Wohlleben’s The Hidden Life of Trees.

download.jpg

April showers (or in Vermont this spring – snow) bring poetry.

Since poets’ words work best, instead of an official review, for each of our recommended collections of poetry, we are including one of our favorite poems (or a portion of a poem) from that collection. We hope these tastes of poetry will encourage everyone to read more poems throughout the year – not just during April’s National Poetry Month celebrations in the USA. Note: “poem in your pocket day” happens April 26th; maybe one of these poems will be the one you carry that day.

images.jpg

FC9781524733117.jpgPoet in Spain: Frederico Garcia Lorca, new translation by Sarah Arvio (2018) – This new translation of the work of Federico Garcia Lorca, one of the greatest poets and playwrights of the 20th Century (according to his bio), is presented in Spanish first, then in the English translation.

Delirium

The day blurs in the silent fields

Bee-eaters sigh as they fly

The blue and white distance is delirious

The land has its arms thrown wide

Ay lord lord All this is too much

FC9781555978136.jpgWade in the Water by Tracy Smith (2018) – Our review wouldn’t be complete without including the newest book by powerful woman and current Poet Laureate of the United States, Tracy Smith. Her collection showcases minority American voices ranging from immigrants, to refugees, to Civil War era African-American soldiers (in the form of their letters) and shines a spotlight on these citizen’s experiences. The poem we highlight opens her book and lands the reader in a moment of time in Brooklyn, New York in the 1980’s, full of beautiful food, luscious words, youth, and innocence.

Garden of Eden (condensed for reasons of space, with apologies to the poet)

What a profound longing I feel,  just this very instant, For the Garden of Eden On Montague Street Where I seldom shopped, Usually only after therapy, Elbow sore at the crook From a hand basket filled To capacity. The glossy pastries! Pomegranate, persimmon, quince!

Once, a bag of black, beluga Lentils split a trail behind me While I labored to find A tea they refused to carry. It was Brooklyn. My thirties.

Everyone I know was living The same desolate luxury, Each ashamed of the same things: Innocence and privacy. I’d lug Home the paper bags, doing Bank-balance math and counting days. I’d squint into it, or close my eyes And let it slam me in the face —- The known sun setting On the dawning century.

FC9781614293316.jpgThe Poetry of Impermanence, Mindfulness, and Joy edited by John Brehm (2017). One person we know, reads a poem a day from this gorgeous book. This daily practice has enriched her year. Below is a small poem of quiet appreciation touches on several of this reviewer’s biggest loves: birds, bubbling soup, and rays of sunshine,

It’s All Right (condensed for reasons of space, with apologies to the poet) by William Stafford (1914-1993)

Someone you trusted has treated you bad. Someone has used you to vent their ill temper. Did you expect anything different? Your work – better than some others’ – has languished, neglected. Or a job you tried was too hard, and you failed. Maybe weather or bad luck spoiled what you did. That grudge, held against you for years after you patched up, has flared, and you’ve lost your friend for a time. Things at home aren’t so good; on the job your spirits have sunk. But just when the worst bears down you find a pretty bubble in your soup at noon, and outside at work, a bird says, “Hi!”

Slowly the sun creeps along the floor; it is coming your way. It touches your shoe.

FC9780062435521.jpgRon Rash Poems: New and Selected by Ron Rash (2016) – When we saw a collection of poems by the author of the Cove, we had to peruse.  We found this gem among so many about life in Appalachia.

The Country Singer Explains Her Muse (condensed for reasons of space, with apologies to the poet)

Say you’re on a bus between Baton Rouge and New Orleans, pills that got you through the show slow to wear off, so you stare out the window, searching for darkened houses where you know women sleep who live a life you once lived, but now sing about.

Let them dream as you write out words and a chords to find a song made to get them through their day, get you through a sleepless night somewhere on a bus between Baton Rouge and New Orleans.

FC9780807025581.jpgBullets Into Bells: Poets and citizens respond to gun violence edited by Brian Clements (2017). This collection consists of poems by well-known and lesser-known poets, with a response to each penned by a different person affected by the particulars that poem explores.  Together they are doubly powerful.

A Poem for Pulse by Jameson Fitzpatrick (an excerpt, condensed for reasons of space, with apologies to the poet)

Last night I went to a gay bar with a man I love a little. After dinner we had a drink…While I slept, a man went to a gay club with two guns and killed forty-nine people. Today in an interview, his father said he had been disturbed recently by the sight of two men kissing…

We must love one another whether or not we die. Love can’t block a bullet but neither can it be shot down, and love is, for the most part, what makes us – in Orlando and in Brooklyn and in Kabul. We will be everywhere, always; there’s nowhere else for us or you, to go. Anywhere you run in this world, love will be there to greet you. Around any corner, there might be two men. Kissing.

FC9780316266574.jpgI’m Just No Good at Rhyming by Chris Harris and illustrated by Lane Smith (2018) – Very fun poems, with funny illustrations for kids, including… The Secret of My Art 

“It’s a beautiful whale”, my teacher declared. “This drawing will get a gold star!”

“It’s a beautiful whale”, my father declared. “Your talents will carry you far!”

“It’s a beautiful whale”, my mother declared. “What a wonderful artist you are!”

Well, maybe it is a beautiful whale… But I was trying to draw a guitar.

vc.jpg

Once again we highlight books that in some fashion address sexual assault as part National Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention Month. We promise each of these books is a great book in its own right; we just unite them here because they each in some way help us think about how to prevent violence in both words and deeds. They also provide an excuse to once again highlight the important work of WISE — our local organization dedicated to ending gender-based violence through survivor-centered advocacy, prevention, education, and mobilization for social change. In this age of #metoo, we still believe in the power of books to provide greater understanding of sexual assault, and its costs for all of us.

wiselogofinallogo.png

FC9780062362599.jpgHunger by Roxane Gay (2017) – I don’t think I have ever read such a well-written, honest, and brutal account of sexual assault and its aftermath. This sounds like a horrific reason to pick up a book; and, it is horrid to think that the author endured a brutal and life-altering assault at age 12. Her analysis of her life after assault, as a morbidly obese woman in a society that abhors fat people, is brutal and punctuated with self-loathing. That said, her story and Ms. Gay’s candid insight offer much more than horror; this memoir is also filled with hope, self love, professional accomplishments, friendships, mistakes, social commentary, and always, always her body and her relationship with it. If you wish to understand how sexual assault affects people long after the crime, Ms. Gay will help. If you have ever tried to explain your relationship with your own body, Ms. Gay will help. If you have never understood this relationship, Ms. Gay will help. If you want to better understand how people who are obese often feel, Ms. Gay offers this gift to you. If you have a complicated relationship with your body, Ms. Gay shows you are not alone. If you just want to spend some time with a talented writer of insight, Ms. Gay’s Hunger is your chance. (Previously reviewed in We’re Back, with Two Great Books from Our “Gone Reading Break“.)  ~Lisa Christie

FC9781616205041-1.jpgYoung Jane Young by Gabrielle Zevin (2017) – For those of us who lived through the Bill Clinton sexual relations intern scandal, this book will seem familiar. What might not seem so familiar is the humor and candor about society’s standards contained in this “light” novel about how decisions we make when we are young have implications. (Also reviewed during our recent Pages in the Pub.) ~Lisa Cadow and Lisa Christie

FC9780062684929.jpgUnbelievable by Katy Tur (2017) – An up front and personal account of the 2016 presidential race from the perspective of a MSNBC and MBC reporter who followed Trump from the time when everyone thought his candidacy was a long shot all the way through his election.  Why do we include it here?  Because part of this book deals with Candidate Trump’s treatment of women including an unwanted, unexpected, and unprofessional kiss of Ms. Tur by Mr. Trump. As Jill Abramson said in a New York Times book review – “Compelling… this book couldn’t be more timely.”  (First reviewed on LAST Minute Holiday Gift Ideas.) ~Lisa Christie

FC9780312674397.jpgSpeak by Laurie Halse Anderson (2001) – What happens when a high school student attends a party and is raped by an upperclassman, someone she has to see every day at school afterwards? Ms. Anderson provided one answer to this question long before the #metoo movement in this page-turning book for young adults.  Years after reading this award-winning young adult novel, we still remember being completely taken by the narrator, Melinda, and her story. This thought-provoking YA novel bursts open many of the hypocritical aspects of high school and illustrates the importance of learning to speak up for oneself (and we would argue to speak up for those who can not speak for themselves), while opening a window into the horrors of rape. Speak was a 1999 National Book Award Finalist for Young People’s Literature. (First reviewed in another WISE post years ago.) ~Lisa Cadow and Lisa Christie

FC9780307949486.jpgGirl With the Dragon Tattoo by Stieg Larsson (2005) – Perhaps the ultimate revenge novel, this thriller follows a woman and her ways of coping with unspeakable childhood trauma. It is an international bestseller, twice a movie, and spawned the translation into many languages of crime stories by many, many Scandinavian authors. (First reviewed in Summer’s Sneaky Pleasures Scandinavian Thrillers.) ~Lisa Cadow and Lisa Christie

FC9781449486792-1.jpgthe sun and her flowers by Rupi Kaur (2017) – Somehow we missed her first best-selling book, but in a time where the news is full of people behaving horribly and many of us feeling some angst and hopelessness, Ms. Kaur’s honest poems about heart-break, loss, rape, love, relationships, and hope are just what we needed. “To hate is an easy lazy thing but to love takes strength everyone has but not all are willing to practice” seems a perfect thought for today’s news. And, “a lot of times we are angry at other people for not doing what we should have done for ourselves” hit home. ~Lisa Cadow and Lisa Christie

images.jpg

We hesitate to follow the joy of family celebrations for Passover and Easter, and the first signs of true spring with a post about war and refugees. However, waking this morning and hearing news from the weekend about immigrants in the USA, and noting that Syria has really never left the news for years, we are forging ahead with reviewing books that help us all learn a bit more about refugees and war. As much as we’d love for the world to be at peace, it is not. And, we firmly believe reading great books about important topics is a great way we can all help move the needle towards peace.

So, today we review two books about refugees and war that help us look a little deeper than the NPR stories and newspaper articles on these topics. One book is a fictional account of war in an unnamed country that could be Syria. The other is a first person account by a child of living in a war zone – in her case Syria. Both are important, helpful, and we believe worth your time.

refugees.jpg

FC9780735212206.jpgExit West by Mohsin Hamid – We LOVE this novel.  It is short, gorgeously written, and covers important topics (e.g., immigration, war). Clever in every way. Two bonus aspects — 1) it is an excellent Book Club choice; and, 2) it is now available in paperback.

Now, a brief plot summary that in no way does this book justice: two young people — fierce Nadia and gentle Saeed — meet as their home country teeters on the brink and then eventually succumbs to civil war. Their struggle to find and create home, spans this terrific novel about refugees, war, randomness, friendship, kindness, family, and love. ~ Lisa Cadow and Lisa Christie

FC9781501178443.jpgDear World by Bana Alabed (2018) — I don’t tweet so I missed the “real-time” story of this young Syrian. But, I am so glad I found Ms. Alabed’s book about her life. Tragically, her idyllic childhood ended at age three when civil war arrived in Aleppo. As war continued, she endured bombing, destruction, and fear while trapped with her family with little to no access to food, water, or medicine. Eventually, Ms. Alabed and her family escape to Turkey. Throughout, she tweeted about her experience. These tweets and some prose from her mother comprise this moving and important first-hand account about living in war and being a refugee. Is this high literature? Probably not; but, it is a raw first hand account of living in a war zone and being a refugee. And, sometimes it takes a kid to bring the horrors of the headlines to life. Don’t take our word for it though. JK Rowling described this book as “a story of love and courage amid brutality and terror, this is the testimony of a child who has endured the unthinkable.” ~ Lisa Christie

download.jpg