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Archive for the ‘Meet the Author’ Category

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This week we feature “3 Questions” with Joanne Serling, author of Good Neighbors, about whom Kirkus Reviews says  – “[Serling] writes with verve and frequent insight”. In Good Neighbors, her debut novel, Ms. Sterling  focuses on the lives of four young families in an idyllic suburb whose lives, views, and morality are challenged by one family’s upheaval.

Ms. Serling’s fiction has been nominated for a Pushcart Prize and has appeared in New Ohio Review and North American Review. She is a graduate of Cornell University and studied and taught fiction at The Writers Studio in New York City. She lives outside of New York with her husband and children and is at work on her second book.

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Ms. Serling will appear at the Norwich Bookstore at 7 pm on Wednesday, March 14thThis event is free and open to the public. However, reservations are recommended as space is limited. Please call 802-649-1114 or email info@norwichbookstore.com to save a seat and/or secure your autographed copy of Good Neighbors.

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1.What three books have helped shape you into the writer you are today, and why?

Mrs. Bridge by Evan S. Connell had a huge influence on me as a writer. It’s an indelible portrait of a housewife navigating the changing American landscape between the first and second world wars. Besides loving the depth and simplicity of the writing, I was amazed at the similarities between the domestic world of Mrs. Bridge and modern American motherhood. I thought, “Ah ha! I want to write about this!” and I pretty much ran to my local library and started what I hoped would be a contemporary version of the book. Needless to say, I got stuck around chapter four. I failed to grasp how nuanced and sharply observed Connell’s masterpiece is, and didn’t yet have my own Mrs. Bridge. But I held on to the idea of short, episodic chapters about domestic life and came back to that form when I landed on the idea for Good Neighbors..

I had a similarly charged reaction when I read That Night by Alice McDermott. Never before had I never read an author who unfolded a single event so masterfully, turning ordinary life into something dramatic and powerful in the process. I ordered all of McDermott’s books after that and just devoured them, underlining passages and trying to figure out her secret. The ‘secret’ is that she’s an incredibly gifted writer, but that exercise grounded me in the idea that everyday life can be made extraordinary with enough love and connection to the material.

Lastly, I have to mention Edith Wharton, particularly Age of Innocence, which I read in college, long before I thought I could dare to become a writer. Wharton’s book electrified me — I couldn’t believe that social class, much less romance, could be the stuff of literature– and that story planted the seed that money and class were worthy of exploration. Wharton is one of my favorite writers and like Mc Dermott, once I discovered her, I read all of her work.

But I would be remiss if I didn’t also mention Kate Walbert’s Our Kind in this list. Her wonderful stories about a certain generation of upper middle class women, told in the first person plural, were like a gateway drug for me. For many years and many drafts, I used a similar narrative style to help tell the story of Good Neighbors. Eventually, I switched the narrative to first person and relegated the large “we” narrator to the prologue and epilogue, but Walbert’s book was a huge inspiration.

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2.What author (living or dead) would you most like to have a cup of coffee with and why?

I greatly admire Adam Haslett and would love the chance to tell him in person how much his books have meant to me.
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3.What books are currently on your bedside table?

I actually bought a larger bedside table recently, because I had too many books and magazines to fit on the one I owned. But of course, the new table is just as crowded and there are still piles on the floor. All of this to say I’m a peripatetic reader who moves from short stories to novels to essays pretty regularly. In one pile is my stack of New Yorkers, Tin Houseand Paris Review issues that I continually dip into when I have just a few minutes and want some nourishment.

Closest to my bed is my pile of current reads, which at the moment includes The Bitch is Back, a stunning collection of essays about women’s lives, and several new novels that I’m dying to start: An American Marriage by Tayari Jones, Mira T. Lee’s Everything Here is Beautiful, and Rachel Lyon’s Self Portrait with Boy.

NOTE: As part of our mission to promote authors, the joy of reading, and to better understand the craft of writing and the living of life, we’ve paired with the The Norwich Bookstore in Norwich, Vermont to present an ongoing series entitled “3 Questions”. In it, we pose three questions to authors with upcoming visits to the bookstore or bookstore related venues. Their responses are posted on The Book Jam during the days leading up to their engagement. Our hope is that this exchange will offer insight into their work and will encourage readers to both attend these special author events and read their books.

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This week we feature “3 Questions” with Annelise Orleck, author of We Are All Fast-Food Workers Now. Her latest of many books offers look at globalization as seen through the eyes of workers-activists: small farmers, fast-food servers, retail workers, hotel housekeepers, home-healthcare aides, airport workers, and adjunct professors who are fighting for respect, safety, and a living wage. Professor Orleck is a professor of history at Dartmouth College and the author of five books on politics, immigration, and activism, including Storming Caesars Palace: How Black Mothers Fought Their Own War on Poverty. She lives in Vermont.

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Professor Orleck will appear at the Norwich Bookstore at 7 pm on Wednesday, February 28th. This event is free and open to the public. However, reservations are recommended as space is limited. Please call 802-649-1114 or email info@norwichbookstore.com to save a seat and/or secure your autographed copy of We Are All Fast Food Workers Now.

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1.What three books have helped shape you into the writer you are today, and why?

The books/authors that have had the most profound impact on shaping me as a writer offer a mix of brilliant language, history, heart, music, insight into the troubling and wonderful human and flights of imagination that took me away.

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2.What author (living or dead) would you most like to have a cup of coffee with and why?

I have had the pleasure of meeting some of my faves, including Bashevis Singer, Toni Cade, and Dorothy Allison. But most of all, I will always cherish the pleasure of hanging out in the Thetford Elementary School yard and at Thetford’s Treasure Island with Grace Paley.

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3.What books are currently on your bedside table?

Books currently on my night stand:

 

NOTE: As part of our mission to promote authors, the joy of reading, and to better understand the craft of writing and the living of life, we’ve paired with the The Norwich Bookstore in Norwich, Vermont to present an ongoing series entitled “3 Questions”. In it, we pose three questions to authors with upcoming visits to the bookstore or bookstore related venues. Their responses are posted on The Book Jam during the days leading up to their engagement. Our hope is that this exchange will offer insight into their work and will encourage readers to both attend these special author events and read their books.

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NOTE — this talk was postponed to February 16th due to icy weather.

This week we feature “3 Questions” with Cullen Murphy, author of Cartoon County: My Father and His Friends in the Golden Age of Make-BelieveMr. Murphy is the editor-at-large at Vanity Fair and the former managing editor of The Atlantic Monthly. (He is  also the brother of the The Long Haul author and truck driver Finn Murphy who visited The Norwich Bookstore last year.)

Cartoon County tells the story of Mr. Murphy’s father — John Cullen Murphy – the illustrator of the wildly popular comic strips Prince Valiant and Big Ben Bolt, and a man who had been trained by Norman Rockwell. Cartoon County focuses on a period of time in the last century when many of the the nation’s top cartoonists and magazine illustrators – including Mr. Murohy’s father – were neighbors in the southwestern corner of Connecticut. This book, through the lens of the author’s relationship with his father, brings the postwar American era and life in the arts alive.

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Mr. Murphy will appear at the Norwich Bookstore at 7 pm on Wednesday, January 17th. This Norwich Bookstore event offers an excellent opportunity to learn about this unique place and time in the 20th century. This event is free and open to the public. However, reservations are recommended as space is limited. Please call 802-649-1114 or email info@norwichbookstore.com to save a seat and/or secure your autographed copy of Cartoon County.

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1.What three books have helped shape you into the writer and editor you are today, and why?

A Sense of Where You Are, by John McPhee. This was McPhee’s profile of Bill Bradley as a Princeton basketball player, and I read it in college. It made me aware of the possibilities of a certain kind of literary reporting. Three Men in a Boat, by Jerome K. Jerome. A teacher gave me this nineteenth-century romp when I was in seventh grade in Ireland–there was a kind of high-end silliness about it that has offered a reminder ever since not to take yourself too seriously. Big Story, by Peter Braestrup. Peter was a mentor, and this book was his account of how the press reported the Tet Offensive in Vietnam. It was influential because the account offers many cautionary tales; because it demonstrated that a journalist could do scholarly work; and because I watched him research and write it even as he held a full-time job, showing how that was done.

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2.What author (living or dead) would you most like to have a cup of coffee with and why?

Maybe William James. From what I can tell just from his writing–I’ve never read a biography, and should–he seems to have combined an omnidirectional mind and a genial disposition. And for someone who was at his peak around the turn of the last century, he comes across as someone whom you could bump into tomorrow and think you were meeting a contemporary. You would never think that about his novelist brother.

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3.What books are currently on your bedside table?

Munich, by Robert Harris. I’m a big Robert Harris fan, and would especially recommend his Rome trilogy, built around Cicero. (Also Pompeii–the opening scene is a classic.) Dinner at the Center of the Earth, by Nathan Englander. I’ve loved Englander’s work ever since reading the early stories of his that we published in The Atlantic. And Grant, by Ron Chernow. Anything by Chernow is worthwhile. Although Hamilton has gotten the most attention–for obvious reasons–I was captivated by his biographies of Rockefeller and Washington.

NOTE: As part of our mission to promote authors, the joy of reading, and to better understand the craft of writing and the living of life, we’ve paired with the The Norwich Bookstore in Norwich, Vermont to present an ongoing series entitled “3 Questions”. In it, we pose three questions to authors with upcoming visits to the bookstore or bookstore related venues. Their responses are posted on The Book Jam during the days leading up to their engagement. Our hope is that this exchange will offer insight into their work and will encourage readers to both attend these special author events and read their books.

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So, kids did it again. During another BOOK BUZZ last week, the student and staff presenters provided a perfect, eclectic list of great books for us to give the kids in our life this holiday season, and to read ourselves. This time, the presenters were all students and teachers from Marion Cross School in our hometown of Norwich, Vermont.

So, a HUGE THANK YOU to the Marion Cross School presenters (listed at the end of this list), the Marion Cross PTO, Stephanie McCaull for her excellent coaching skills and unwavering support, the Norwich Bookstore for generously donating 20% of sales from BOOK BUZZ to the school, and all who attended and provided these amazing presenters a great audience (around 150 people), while also reinforcing the importance of reading great books.

Without further ado, their selections and their 6 word reviews. Please have fun giving and getting the books on this list.

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BOOKS FOR YOUR FRIENDS WHO DON’T LIKE TO READ BUT WHO WOULD LOVE A GREAT STORY

  • Sled Dog School by Terry Lynn Johnson (2017). Selected by Guin – Inspiring tale of perseverance.

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BEST FAMILY OR CLASSROOM READ ALOUD

  • The Pushcart War by Jean Merrill (1964). Selected by Phin – NYC pushcarts fight truck bullies.
  • Shiloh by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor (2000). Selected by Isla – Boy rescues abused dog, loves him.
  • Matilda by Roald Dahl (1988). Selected by Blythe – Girl escapes mean parents with magic.

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PERFECT BOOKS TO HELP YOU IGNORE THE FACT THAT YOU ARE WAITING FOR YOUR SISTER OR BROTHER TO FINISH HOCKEY PRACTICE

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FUN, NON-FICTION BOOKS FOR KIDS WHO PREFER TRUE STORIES

  • A Long Walk to Water by Linda Sue Park (2010). Selected by Izzy – A boy’s journey during fatal war.
  • How Things Work by T.J. Resler (2016). Selected by Natalie – Shows how machines like iPhones work.

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FICTION BOOKS THAT DO A GREAT JOB TEACHING HISTORY

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GREAT BOOKS TO GIVE YOUR FRIENDS FOR THEIR BIRTHDAYS

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PICTURE BOOKS TO READ WITH YOUR READING BUDDY (OR YOUNGER SISTER OR BROTHER)

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A BOOK THAT WILL MAKE YOU LAUGH AWAY YOUR TROUBLES

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SPORTS BOOKS THAT ARE ABOUT SO MUCH MORE

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SERIES YOU WON’T BE ABLE TO PUT DOWN, OR WHAT TO READ WHEN YOU RUN OUT OF WIMPY KID BOOKS

 

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The Presenters

4th grade

  • Blythe
  • Isaiah
  • Jacobi
  • Mayuri
  • Isla
  • Phin

5th grade

  • Kaya
  • Jai
  • Zabava
  • Natalie
  • Guin
  • Maddy

6th grade

  • Felix
  • Kai
  • Jess
  • Izzy
  • Iver
  • Oliver

Adults

  • Mrs. French
  • Mr. Bill
  • Lisa Christie

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This week we feature “3 Questions” with Finn Murphy, author of The Long Haul: A Trucker’s Tales of Life on the Road.  Years ago, Mr. Murphy dropped out of college and started his long stint as long-haul trucker, covering covered more than a million miles to date. In The Long Haul, Mr. Murphy offers a trucker’s-eye view of America, reflecting on work, class, and the bonds we form throughout our lives.

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Mr. Finn will appear at the Norwich Bookstore at 7 pm on Wednesday, November 8th. This Norwich Bookstore event offers an excellent opportunity to listen and learn about life in America today, from a perspective many of us do not encounter in our daily life – that of a long-haul trucker. This event is free and open to the public. However, reservations are recommended as space is limited. Please call 802-649-1114 or email info@norwichbookstore.com to save a seat and/or secure your autographed copy of The Long Haul: A Trucker’s Tales of Life on the Road. (We think this might be a great holiday gift for so many on your lists – for those of you already shopping).

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1.What three books have helped shape you into the writer you are today, and why?

1984 because George Orwell completely nails authoritarianism. It’s attractions, it’s method, and it’s ultimate goal.

Anything by John McPhee, let’s use as an example Uncommon Carriers: Really good writing can describe anything and make it interesting. My book goes into many arcane details about truck-driving and moving people and I always had McPhee in mind when doing that.

Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy by John LeCarre because it shows how complicated betrayal can really be.

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2.What author (living or dead) would you most like to have a cup of coffee with and why?

Herman Melville. We both liked manual work, did manual work, and wrote about manual work. Melville would have been very much at home in a moving van on the road. It’s not a lot different than a whaling vessel. Hard labor mixed with boredom, travel, horrible clean-ups, and an amazing perch to observe human beings at their worst.

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3.What books are currently on your bedside table?

A Legacy of Spies by LeCarre. It’s the inside story of The Spy Who Came in from the Cold. That’s a great book! Maybe 160pp, but like Gatsby, puts it all in where it needs to be and nothing extra. Almost perfect writing. I say that for both. I flatter myself that I’m the world’s foremost authority on the LeCarre opus.

Doctkor Faustus by Thomas Mann. This is always on my nightstand. I can pick it up on any page and get mesmerized. Favorite quote from the book: “It’s not so easy to get into Hell.”

Ranger Games by Ben Blum. Recommended by a bookseller at an event. Army Ranger robs a bank. His cousin wants to know why. Riveting.

Girl Waits With Gun by Amy Stewart. I’m no book snob. I’ll read anything, almost. I haven’t cracked this yet but when the time comes for just plain entertainment, there it is.

NOTE: As part of our mission to promote authors, the joy of reading, and to better understand the craft of writing and the living of life, we’ve paired with the The Norwich Bookstore in Norwich, Vermont to present an ongoing series entitled “3 Questions”. In it, we pose three questions to authors with upcoming visits to the bookstore or bookstore related venues. Their responses are posted on The Book Jam during the days leading up to their engagement. Our hope is that this exchange will offer insight into their work and will encourage readers to both attend these special author events and read their books.

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This week we feature two authors – Elizabeth Marshall Thomas and Sy Montgomery – who are slated for an amazing evening exploring the natural world and discussing their new book Tamed and Untamed:Close Encounters of the Animal KindThis event will take place at the Norwich Bookstore at 7 pm on Wednesday, October 25.  NOTE: This event is free and open to the public. However, reservations are recommended as space is limited (rumor has it they are already compiling a waiting list). Please call 802-649-1114 or email info@norwichbookstore.com to save a seat and/or secure your autographed copy of Tamed and Untamed (a great holiday gift for those of you already shopping).

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While writing her books for adults and children, Sy Montgomery has been chased by an angry silverback gorilla in Rwanda, hunted by a tiger in India, and swum in the Amazon. One of her 21 books The Soul of an Octopus was a National Book Award finalist. Upper Valley residents can call her neighbor as she lives close by with her husband, the writer Howard Mansfield, and their animal menagerie.

Elizabeth Marshall Thomas has observed dogs, cats, elephants, and human animals during her half-century-long career and during her childhood in Africa. Her many books include Dreaming of Lions and The Hidden Life of Dogs. Like Ms. Montgomery, Ms. Thomas lives near the Upper Valley in New Hampshire.

 

In an experiment in formatting, we have mingled these co-authors’ individual responses to our three questions below.

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1.What three books have helped shape you into the writer you are today, and why?

The three books that shaped me were (1) The Jungle Book by Rudyard Kipling  (hated the movie) (2) The Wolves of Mount McKinleyby Adolph Murie, and (3) The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway—the first two because they’re about animals and Hemingway because he changed the way people write. ~ Liz M Thomas

FC9780805073683.jpgThe Outermost House by Henry Beston. A quote from these pages helped me to define what I set out to do in chronicling the natural world. “We need another and a wiser and perhaps a more mystical concept of animals…..For the animal shall not be measured by man. In a world older and more complete than ours, they move finished and complete, gifted with extensions of the senses we have lost or never attained, living by voices we shall never hear. They are not brethren, they are not underlings; they are other nations, caught with ourselves in the net of life and time, fellow prisoners of the splendour and travail of the earth.” ~ Sy Montgomery

FC9780415267472.jpgKing Solomon’s Ring by Konrad Lorenz. I read this classic account of animal behavior as a young woman just out of college and was entranced not only by its scientific revelations but also by the respect and affection with which this imminent naturalist regarded each individual animal. ~ Sy Montgomery

FC9780395924969.jpgThe Edge of the Sea by Rachel Carson. This title introduced me to the work of an author who helped found the modern environmental movement. I bought this, her third book, as a discard at a library sale the first year I began work as a newspaper reporter. I wasn’t yet an environmental reporter, but I wanted to learn about seaweeds and snails. I became a devotee of Carson’s sharp eye and poetic voice and sought outher later works, including Silent Spring, her sweeping expose of the chemical poisoning of the natural world. ~ Sy Montgomery

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2.What author (living or dead) would you most like to have a cup of coffee with and why?

The author I’d like to have a cup of coffee with is Hemingway, because he changed the way people write. ~ Liz M Thomas

Konrad Lorenz, the Nobel-Prize winning naturalist widely credited for founding the science of ethology, the study of animal behavior, one of whose books I mentioned above. And it would have to be more than a cup of coffee. How about a whole pot? There is not one animal known to humankind whose behavior I would not want to discuss with him. And–could I bring Liz? ~ Sy Montgomery

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3.What books are currently on your bedside table?

The book currently on my bedside table is Among the Bone Eaters by Marcus Baynes-Rock, because Baynes-Rock is an anthropologist who studies not only a human population but also the other animals who live in conjunction with them—in this case, Ethiopians and hyenas.  It’s a fabulous book! ~ Liz M Thomas

I actually don’t have a bedside table; instead, right next to my side of the bed is a bookcase the length of the bedroom. But the books currently “in play” on my side at this moment are:

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Well yes, the Book Jam Lisas have “gone reading” and are not posting new reviews until late September. However, sometimes we interrupt our reading to post because of a great opportunity for people to meet a special author. Thus, we are inserting a special “3 Questions” into our “gone reading” break.

This special “3 Questions” features Ricardo Siri, perhaps better known by his middle name Liniers, an artist-in-residence at the Center for Cartoon Studies in White River Junction, Vermont. A native of Argentina, Liniers now lives in our hometown with his wife and three young daughters. His cartoons periodically appear in the New Yorker, as well as in his own books.

Liniers appears at the Norwich Bookstore on Saturday, September 9th from 10 am to noon for a book signing and to speak about Good Night, Planet, his new book for young readers. This graphic novel spins a tale of what toys do when their people go to sleep. Reviewers have said:

  • “There are plenty of stories about what toys get up to at night, but this quiet, masterfully executed comic is particularly enchanting.” –Booklist, starred review
  • “Liniers continues his run of clever comics for kids, with a fun adventure and panels full of easy-to-follow action. Delightful.” –Kirkus, starred review

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Reservations are not required for this event, but plan to arrive early as the Norwich Bookstore is certain to be a popular place to be on Saturday morning due to Linier’s visit. For additional information call the Norwich Bookstore at 802-649-1114.

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1.What three books have helped shape you into the writer/artist you are today, and why?
The Catcher in the Rye, It (Stephen King), and Maus (Art Spiegelman), because they are funny and human, and I wanted to keep seeing the characters after I had put the book down.

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2.What author (living or dead) would you most like to have a cup of coffee with and why?
Stephen King. He’s the best storyteller I know; and, I love storytelling and its immense power throughout the history of mankind.

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3.What books are currently on your bedside table?
The Underground Railroad, Jackson Pollockand It by Stephen King.

NOTE: As part of our mission to promote authors, the joy of reading, and to better understand the craft of writing and the living of life, we’ve paired with the The Norwich Bookstore in Norwich, Vermont to present an ongoing series entitled “3 Questions”. In it, we pose three questions to authors with upcoming visits to the bookstore or bookstore related venues. Their responses are posted on The Book Jam during the days leading up to their engagement. Our hope is that this exchange will offer insight into their work and will encourage readers to both attend these special author events and read their books.

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