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Archive for the ‘Meet the Author’ Category

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This week’s “3 Questions” features Lauren Groff,  bestselling author of the novels The Monsters of Templeton, Arcadia and Fates and Furies, and the short story collection Delicate Edible Birds. Ms. Groff has won the PEN/O’Henry Prize, and was a finalist for both the National Book Award and the National Book Critics Circle Award.

Ms. Groff’s most recent novel is Florida, of which the critics have said, “Storms, snakes, sinkholes, and secrets: In Lauren Groff’s Florida, the hot sun shines, but a wild darkness lurks. Florida is a “superlative” book” – Boston Globe, “gorgeously weird and limber”  – New Yorker,  and “brooding, inventive and often moving” – NPR Fresh Air. Ms. Groff lives with her family in Gainesville, Florida, but will be reading on July 19th (with Fairlee resident and author Christopher Wren) as part of The Meetinghouse Readings in Canaan. These readings are held at 7:30 p.m. on four Thursday evenings in July and early August, and are free and open to the public; no reservations needed. Please call 802-649-1114 or email info@norwichbookstore.com with questions and/or to secure your copies of Ms. Groff’s works.

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1.What three books have helped shape you into the writer you are today, and why?
​Emily Dickinson’s Collected Poems taught me to love poetry and enigma. George Eliot’s Middlemarch ​is a book I reread every year to remind myself what wisdom and warmth look like in a novel. Anne Carson’s Autobiography of Red taught me that writers should risk everything because the reward ​ can be so thrilling.

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2.What author (living or dead) would you most like to have a cup of coffee with and why?
​I’d love to have a cup of coffee with Virginia Woolf to try to understand the brain that could write a book so colossal and world-rearranging as To The Lighthouse.

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3.What books are currently on your bedside table?
​I’m in a renovated barn in Orford, New Hampshire with so little furniture there’s no bedside table. But I’m doing a large project on the largely forgotten writer Nancy Hale and am reading all of her books right now. [Editor’s note: Ms. Hale’s books are unfortunately out of print so you wont find them at the Norwich Bookstore.]

As part of our mission to promote authors, the joy of reading, and to better understand the craft of writing, The Book Jam has paired with the The Norwich Bookstore in Norwich, Vermont to present an ongoing series entitled “3 Questions”. In it, we pose three questions to authors with upcoming visits to the bookstore. Their responses are posted on The Book Jam during the days leading up to their engagement. Our hope is that this exchange will offer insight into their work and will encourage readers to attend these special author events and read their books.

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This week’s “3 Questions” features Christopher Wren, author of  many books and articles including his latest history — Those Turbulent Sons of Freedom: Ethan Allen’s Green Mountain Boys and the American Revolution.

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Mr. Wren retired from The New York Times after nearly twenty-nine years as a reporter, foreign correspondent, and editor. He headed the Times‘ news bureaus in Moscow, Cairo, Beijing, Ottawa, and Johannesburg; covered the United Nations; and reported from the former Soviet Union, Eastern Europe, the Balkans, the Middle East, China, Southeast Asia, Africa, South America, and Canada. He is a visiting professor in Dartmouth’s Master of Arts in Liberal Studies program. He currently lives in Vermont with his wife.

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Mr. Wren will appear at the Norwich Bookstore at 7 pm on Wednesday, May 30th. This event is free and open to the public. However, reservations are recommended as space is limited. Please call 802-649-1114 or email info@norwichbookstore.com to save a seat and/or secure your autographed copy of Those Turbulent Sons of Freedom: Ethan Allen’s Green Mountain Boys and the American Revolution.

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1.What three books have helped shape you into the writer you are today, and why?

It was actually 40 years as a journalist on deadline that shaped me as a writer. I also read authors in the countries where I worked, like Bulgakov’s Master and Margarita, and J.M Coetzee’s Disgrace. Bedtime reads like Lonesome Dove by Larry McMurtry and everything by John Cheever, plus lots of poetry from Alfred Tennyson to W.B. Yeats, Alan Seeger and Billy Collins.

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2.What author (living or dead) would you most like to have a cup of coffee with and why?

I’d prefer to have tea with Jane Austen to discuss my favorite, Persuasion. Or the Spanish war correspondent-turned-novelist Arturo Perez-Reverte, who wrote Queen of the South, about international drug trafficking, which I covered as a journalist.

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3.What books are currently on your bedside table?

Books on my bedside table include Arturo Perez-Reverte‘s novel The Painter of Battles, Being Mortal by Atul Gawande, and Enduring Vietnam by James Wright, the best book I’ve read about Vietnam vets.

As part of our mission to promote authors, the joy of reading, and to better understand the craft of writing, we’ve paired with the The Norwich Bookstore in Norwich, Vermont to present an ongoing series entitled “3 Questions”. In it, we pose three questions to authors with upcoming visits to the bookstore. Their responses are posted on The Book Jam during the days leading up to their engagement. Our hope is that this exchange will offer insight into their work and will encourage readers to attend these special author events and read their books.

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This week’s “3 Questions” features Melanie Finn, author of The Underneath. This novel follows a journalist struggling with the constraints of motherhood. In an effort to disconnect from work and save her marriage, she rents a quaint Vermont farmhouse for the summer. The discovery of a mysterious crawlspace in the rental with unsettling writing etched into the wall, unfolds a plot exploring violence and family.

Ms. Finn‘s previous work has been met with critical acclaim. Her first novel, Away From You was published to international accolades. Her second novel, The Gloaming, was a New York Times Notable Book of 2016,  a finalist for the Vermont Book Award, and The Guardian‘s “Not the Booker” Prize. After living in Kenya, Connecticut, New York, and Tanzania, Ms. Finn currently lives in Vermont with her husband Matt (a wildlife film maker), their twin daughters, three Tanzanian mutts, and two very old horses.

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Ms. Finn will appear at the Norwich Bookstore at 7 pm on Wednesday, May 16thThis event is free and open to the public. However, reservations are recommended as space is limited. Please call 802-649-1114 or email info@norwichbookstore.com to save a seat and/or secure your autographed copy of The Underneath. The novel goes on sale on May 15th, so you will be among the first to read it.

 

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1.What three books have helped shape you into the writer you are today, and why?

Bruce Chatwin’s Songlines, because of his lean prose and because, when I was 21, he told me in a dream that I should become a writer (seriously!); The Power and The Glory by Graham Greene because of the torpid physical and emotional atmosphere Greene creates, and his deeply flawed characters; Beatrix Potter’s books, because she’s not afraid to use long words when speaking to children, because of her humor, because her characters are true to themselves, they’re completely authentic.

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2.What author (living or dead) would you most like to have a cup of coffee with and why?

Bruce Chatwin remains my major literary crush; he died in 1989 but I still dream of going for a long hike in obscure mountains with him – maybe Tibesti in southern Libya. He was interested is everything, anything – his books were so diverse in subject matter: he was an art expert, he walked through the Australian desert, he wrote about two brothers living on a remote farm in Wales and a slave trader in west Africa. There are many others – Margaret Atwood, Jane Smiley, Joan Didion, Willa Cather, Vladimir Nabokov, Ezra Pound, Philip Larkin, Graham Greene, Naguib Mahfouz – but, ooo, I’d be too scared of them. I mean, what do you say to Nabokov?

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3.What books are currently on your bedside table?

Leni Zumas’ Red Clocks, Samantha Hunt’s The Dark Dark, and Peter Wohlleben’s The Hidden Life of Trees.

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This week we feature “3 Questions” with Joanne Serling, author of Good Neighbors, about whom Kirkus Reviews says  – “[Serling] writes with verve and frequent insight”. In Good Neighbors, her debut novel, Ms. Sterling  focuses on the lives of four young families in an idyllic suburb whose lives, views, and morality are challenged by one family’s upheaval.

Ms. Serling’s fiction has been nominated for a Pushcart Prize and has appeared in New Ohio Review and North American Review. She is a graduate of Cornell University and studied and taught fiction at The Writers Studio in New York City. She lives outside of New York with her husband and children and is at work on her second book.

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Ms. Serling will appear at the Norwich Bookstore at 7 pm on Wednesday, March 14thThis event is free and open to the public. However, reservations are recommended as space is limited. Please call 802-649-1114 or email info@norwichbookstore.com to save a seat and/or secure your autographed copy of Good Neighbors.

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1.What three books have helped shape you into the writer you are today, and why?

Mrs. Bridge by Evan S. Connell had a huge influence on me as a writer. It’s an indelible portrait of a housewife navigating the changing American landscape between the first and second world wars. Besides loving the depth and simplicity of the writing, I was amazed at the similarities between the domestic world of Mrs. Bridge and modern American motherhood. I thought, “Ah ha! I want to write about this!” and I pretty much ran to my local library and started what I hoped would be a contemporary version of the book. Needless to say, I got stuck around chapter four. I failed to grasp how nuanced and sharply observed Connell’s masterpiece is, and didn’t yet have my own Mrs. Bridge. But I held on to the idea of short, episodic chapters about domestic life and came back to that form when I landed on the idea for Good Neighbors..

I had a similarly charged reaction when I read That Night by Alice McDermott. Never before had I never read an author who unfolded a single event so masterfully, turning ordinary life into something dramatic and powerful in the process. I ordered all of McDermott’s books after that and just devoured them, underlining passages and trying to figure out her secret. The ‘secret’ is that she’s an incredibly gifted writer, but that exercise grounded me in the idea that everyday life can be made extraordinary with enough love and connection to the material.

Lastly, I have to mention Edith Wharton, particularly Age of Innocence, which I read in college, long before I thought I could dare to become a writer. Wharton’s book electrified me — I couldn’t believe that social class, much less romance, could be the stuff of literature– and that story planted the seed that money and class were worthy of exploration. Wharton is one of my favorite writers and like Mc Dermott, once I discovered her, I read all of her work.

But I would be remiss if I didn’t also mention Kate Walbert’s Our Kind in this list. Her wonderful stories about a certain generation of upper middle class women, told in the first person plural, were like a gateway drug for me. For many years and many drafts, I used a similar narrative style to help tell the story of Good Neighbors. Eventually, I switched the narrative to first person and relegated the large “we” narrator to the prologue and epilogue, but Walbert’s book was a huge inspiration.

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2.What author (living or dead) would you most like to have a cup of coffee with and why?

I greatly admire Adam Haslett and would love the chance to tell him in person how much his books have meant to me.
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3.What books are currently on your bedside table?

I actually bought a larger bedside table recently, because I had too many books and magazines to fit on the one I owned. But of course, the new table is just as crowded and there are still piles on the floor. All of this to say I’m a peripatetic reader who moves from short stories to novels to essays pretty regularly. In one pile is my stack of New Yorkers, Tin Houseand Paris Review issues that I continually dip into when I have just a few minutes and want some nourishment.

Closest to my bed is my pile of current reads, which at the moment includes The Bitch is Back, a stunning collection of essays about women’s lives, and several new novels that I’m dying to start: An American Marriage by Tayari Jones, Mira T. Lee’s Everything Here is Beautiful, and Rachel Lyon’s Self Portrait with Boy.

NOTE: As part of our mission to promote authors, the joy of reading, and to better understand the craft of writing and the living of life, we’ve paired with the The Norwich Bookstore in Norwich, Vermont to present an ongoing series entitled “3 Questions”. In it, we pose three questions to authors with upcoming visits to the bookstore or bookstore related venues. Their responses are posted on The Book Jam during the days leading up to their engagement. Our hope is that this exchange will offer insight into their work and will encourage readers to both attend these special author events and read their books.

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This week we feature “3 Questions” with Annelise Orleck, author of We Are All Fast-Food Workers Now. Her latest of many books offers look at globalization as seen through the eyes of workers-activists: small farmers, fast-food servers, retail workers, hotel housekeepers, home-healthcare aides, airport workers, and adjunct professors who are fighting for respect, safety, and a living wage. Professor Orleck is a professor of history at Dartmouth College and the author of five books on politics, immigration, and activism, including Storming Caesars Palace: How Black Mothers Fought Their Own War on Poverty. She lives in Vermont.

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Professor Orleck will appear at the Norwich Bookstore at 7 pm on Wednesday, February 28th. This event is free and open to the public. However, reservations are recommended as space is limited. Please call 802-649-1114 or email info@norwichbookstore.com to save a seat and/or secure your autographed copy of We Are All Fast Food Workers Now.

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1.What three books have helped shape you into the writer you are today, and why?

The books/authors that have had the most profound impact on shaping me as a writer offer a mix of brilliant language, history, heart, music, insight into the troubling and wonderful human and flights of imagination that took me away.

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2.What author (living or dead) would you most like to have a cup of coffee with and why?

I have had the pleasure of meeting some of my faves, including Bashevis Singer, Toni Cade, and Dorothy Allison. But most of all, I will always cherish the pleasure of hanging out in the Thetford Elementary School yard and at Thetford’s Treasure Island with Grace Paley.

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3.What books are currently on your bedside table?

Books currently on my night stand:

 

NOTE: As part of our mission to promote authors, the joy of reading, and to better understand the craft of writing and the living of life, we’ve paired with the The Norwich Bookstore in Norwich, Vermont to present an ongoing series entitled “3 Questions”. In it, we pose three questions to authors with upcoming visits to the bookstore or bookstore related venues. Their responses are posted on The Book Jam during the days leading up to their engagement. Our hope is that this exchange will offer insight into their work and will encourage readers to both attend these special author events and read their books.

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NOTE — this talk was postponed to February 16th due to icy weather.

This week we feature “3 Questions” with Cullen Murphy, author of Cartoon County: My Father and His Friends in the Golden Age of Make-BelieveMr. Murphy is the editor-at-large at Vanity Fair and the former managing editor of The Atlantic Monthly. (He is  also the brother of the The Long Haul author and truck driver Finn Murphy who visited The Norwich Bookstore last year.)

Cartoon County tells the story of Mr. Murphy’s father — John Cullen Murphy – the illustrator of the wildly popular comic strips Prince Valiant and Big Ben Bolt, and a man who had been trained by Norman Rockwell. Cartoon County focuses on a period of time in the last century when many of the the nation’s top cartoonists and magazine illustrators – including Mr. Murohy’s father – were neighbors in the southwestern corner of Connecticut. This book, through the lens of the author’s relationship with his father, brings the postwar American era and life in the arts alive.

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Mr. Murphy will appear at the Norwich Bookstore at 7 pm on Wednesday, January 17th. This Norwich Bookstore event offers an excellent opportunity to learn about this unique place and time in the 20th century. This event is free and open to the public. However, reservations are recommended as space is limited. Please call 802-649-1114 or email info@norwichbookstore.com to save a seat and/or secure your autographed copy of Cartoon County.

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1.What three books have helped shape you into the writer and editor you are today, and why?

A Sense of Where You Are, by John McPhee. This was McPhee’s profile of Bill Bradley as a Princeton basketball player, and I read it in college. It made me aware of the possibilities of a certain kind of literary reporting. Three Men in a Boat, by Jerome K. Jerome. A teacher gave me this nineteenth-century romp when I was in seventh grade in Ireland–there was a kind of high-end silliness about it that has offered a reminder ever since not to take yourself too seriously. Big Story, by Peter Braestrup. Peter was a mentor, and this book was his account of how the press reported the Tet Offensive in Vietnam. It was influential because the account offers many cautionary tales; because it demonstrated that a journalist could do scholarly work; and because I watched him research and write it even as he held a full-time job, showing how that was done.

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2.What author (living or dead) would you most like to have a cup of coffee with and why?

Maybe William James. From what I can tell just from his writing–I’ve never read a biography, and should–he seems to have combined an omnidirectional mind and a genial disposition. And for someone who was at his peak around the turn of the last century, he comes across as someone whom you could bump into tomorrow and think you were meeting a contemporary. You would never think that about his novelist brother.

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3.What books are currently on your bedside table?

Munich, by Robert Harris. I’m a big Robert Harris fan, and would especially recommend his Rome trilogy, built around Cicero. (Also Pompeii–the opening scene is a classic.) Dinner at the Center of the Earth, by Nathan Englander. I’ve loved Englander’s work ever since reading the early stories of his that we published in The Atlantic. And Grant, by Ron Chernow. Anything by Chernow is worthwhile. Although Hamilton has gotten the most attention–for obvious reasons–I was captivated by his biographies of Rockefeller and Washington.

NOTE: As part of our mission to promote authors, the joy of reading, and to better understand the craft of writing and the living of life, we’ve paired with the The Norwich Bookstore in Norwich, Vermont to present an ongoing series entitled “3 Questions”. In it, we pose three questions to authors with upcoming visits to the bookstore or bookstore related venues. Their responses are posted on The Book Jam during the days leading up to their engagement. Our hope is that this exchange will offer insight into their work and will encourage readers to both attend these special author events and read their books.

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So, kids did it again. During another BOOK BUZZ last week, the student and staff presenters provided a perfect, eclectic list of great books for us to give the kids in our life this holiday season, and to read ourselves. This time, the presenters were all students and teachers from Marion Cross School in our hometown of Norwich, Vermont.

So, a HUGE THANK YOU to the Marion Cross School presenters (listed at the end of this list), the Marion Cross PTO, Stephanie McCaull for her excellent coaching skills and unwavering support, the Norwich Bookstore for generously donating 20% of sales from BOOK BUZZ to the school, and all who attended and provided these amazing presenters a great audience (around 150 people), while also reinforcing the importance of reading great books.

Without further ado, their selections and their 6 word reviews. Please have fun giving and getting the books on this list.

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BOOKS FOR YOUR FRIENDS WHO DON’T LIKE TO READ BUT WHO WOULD LOVE A GREAT STORY

  • Sled Dog School by Terry Lynn Johnson (2017). Selected by Guin – Inspiring tale of perseverance.

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BEST FAMILY OR CLASSROOM READ ALOUD

  • The Pushcart War by Jean Merrill (1964). Selected by Phin – NYC pushcarts fight truck bullies.
  • Shiloh by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor (2000). Selected by Isla – Boy rescues abused dog, loves him.
  • Matilda by Roald Dahl (1988). Selected by Blythe – Girl escapes mean parents with magic.

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PERFECT BOOKS TO HELP YOU IGNORE THE FACT THAT YOU ARE WAITING FOR YOUR SISTER OR BROTHER TO FINISH HOCKEY PRACTICE

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FUN, NON-FICTION BOOKS FOR KIDS WHO PREFER TRUE STORIES

  • A Long Walk to Water by Linda Sue Park (2010). Selected by Izzy – A boy’s journey during fatal war.
  • How Things Work by T.J. Resler (2016). Selected by Natalie – Shows how machines like iPhones work.

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FICTION BOOKS THAT DO A GREAT JOB TEACHING HISTORY

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GREAT BOOKS TO GIVE YOUR FRIENDS FOR THEIR BIRTHDAYS

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PICTURE BOOKS TO READ WITH YOUR READING BUDDY (OR YOUNGER SISTER OR BROTHER)

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A BOOK THAT WILL MAKE YOU LAUGH AWAY YOUR TROUBLES

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SPORTS BOOKS THAT ARE ABOUT SO MUCH MORE

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SERIES YOU WON’T BE ABLE TO PUT DOWN, OR WHAT TO READ WHEN YOU RUN OUT OF WIMPY KID BOOKS

 

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The Presenters

4th grade

  • Blythe
  • Isaiah
  • Jacobi
  • Mayuri
  • Isla
  • Phin

5th grade

  • Kaya
  • Jai
  • Zabava
  • Natalie
  • Guin
  • Maddy

6th grade

  • Felix
  • Kai
  • Jess
  • Izzy
  • Iver
  • Oliver

Adults

  • Mrs. French
  • Mr. Bill
  • Lisa Christie

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