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Archive for the ‘Tough GIfts’ Category

Image result for images of holiday giftsDo not panic – we are here with some GREAT ideas for last minute gift giving. Happy end of 2018, and happy holidays.

Adult Nonfiction/Coffee Table/Gift Books

Bibliophile: An Illustrated Miscellany Cover ImageBibliophile: An Illustrated Miscellany by Janet Mount (2018) – For the voracious book omnivore in your life, this cleverly curated offering will feel perfectly at home decorating a coffee table, in a well-stocked bathroom, or simply piled by the bedside. Wherever it lives, however, it will always find itself in someone’s hands. The colorful cover illustration entices the viewer to open the book and once in, provides much food for thought: What are the best bookstores in New York City (including the quizzes that they offer potential new hires!)? What are some of  the most iconic book covers of the past several decades? Name some of the best literary cats! There are even “Bibliophile” notecards and a daily planner that can accompany this lovely gift. ~Lisa Cadow

The Lost Words Cover ImageThe Lost Words by Robert Macfarlane, illustrated by Janet Morris (2017) – This gorgeous, oversized picture book could be gifted equally to the word lovers, nature-enthusiasts, etymological historians, and art-appreciators in your life. The Lost Words is a most thought-provoking recent compilation that challenges readers of any age to consider why words disappear — or, conversely, are born. It highlights and lushly illustrates words such as “dandelion,” “willow,” and “otter” that were, in the most recent revision of the Oxford Junior Dictionary, edited out of the compilation by the Oxford University Press. In their place, were put new ones such as “blog”, “broadband”, “chatroom”, “committee”, and “voice-mail.”  This is a beautiful conversation piece – perusing it makes the reader  feel as if she is taking a stroll through the English countryside – that will challenge all who encounter it to take a moment to reflect on our rapidly changing, albeit still stunning natural world. ~Lisa Cadow and Lisa Christie

Calypso Cover ImageCalypso by David Sedaris (2018) – Mr. Sedaris’s latest collection of essays tackles the “not-so-joyful” aspects of reaching middle age. Perhaps because of this, this collection is not as laugh-out-loud funny as his previous collections. That said, it is impossible for me to read Mr. Sedaris’s work without hearing his distinctive voice in my head, making his wry insights even funnier than they initially appear on the page. And honestly, his perceptive commentary about life’s mundane and heartbreaking moments is superb no matter the level of humor. Pick this up and enjoy or give it as a great gift! ~ Lisa Christie

Adult Fiction

Lethal White (A Cormoran Strike Novel) Cover ImageLethal White (and other titles) by Robert Galbraith (2018) – This series continues to be one of my favorites. I was so grateful to devour this thriller as the news from DC was so horrid. And I will let the New York Times speak for me – “At times you might feel as you did when reading the Harry Potter books, particularly later in the series, when they got longer and looser. You love the plot, and you love being in the company of the characters, and you admire the author’s voice and insights and ingenuity, and you relish the chance to relax into a book without feeling rushed or puzzled or shortchanged…. Long live the fertile imagination and prodigious output of J.K. Rowling.”The New York Times ~ Lisa Christie

CIRCE (#1 New York Times bestseller) Cover ImageCirce by Madeline Miller (2018) – A perfect book for fans of mythology or the classics. Really one of the best books of 2018, this novel retells portions of the Odyssey from the perspective of Circe, the original Greek witch. As The Guardian described it, Circe is not a rival to its original sources, but instead ” a romp, an airy delight, a novel to be gobbled greedily in a single sitting”. If needed, this would be an especially great gift for the feminists in your life. ~ Lisa Christie

Priest Turned Therapist Treats Fear of God: Poems Cover ImagePriest Turned Therapist Treats Fear of God: Poems by Tony Hoagland (2018) –  I would have picked this up for the title alone, but a recommendation from delightfully smart and poetry-loving Penny McConnel of the Norwich Bookstore meant I had to read it. She wanted to include it in her Pages in the Pub selections, but ran out of choices; so, I am happy to include it for her here. This collection contemplates human nature and modern culture with anger, humor, and humility. I honestly wanted to read this collection in one fell swoop and had to force myself to slow down and savor each poem. As The New York Times wrote, “Hoagland’s verse is consistently, and crucially, bloodied by a sense of menace and by straight talk.” ~ Lisa  Christie

Exit West: A Novel Cover ImageExit West by Moshin Hamid (2017) – We LOVED this novel.  It is short, gorgeously written, and covers important and timely topics – love immigration, war. Basically perfect. Or, as the New York Times said in it’s review, “It was as if Hamid knew what was going to happen to America and the world, and gave us a road map to our future… At once terrifying and … oddly hopeful.” –Ayelet Waldman in The New York Times Book Review ~ Lisa Cadow and Lisa Christie

Teens

Love & Other Carnivorous Plants Cover ImageLove & Other Carnivorous Plants by Florence Gonsalves (2018) – A superb YA book that deals with eating disorders, death, questioning one’s sexuality, mental health issues, and going away to, and returning from college with grace and love and humor. Quick plot summary Danny and Sara met in Kindergarten and vowed to be friends forever – a vow strained by Danny’s departure to Harvard after first promising to room with Sara at another college. Things unravel for them both while apart and their reunion back home during the summer after their first year away starts the drama of this book. Truly a stellar debut by this young (I think she is 24) author. This book received a starred review by Book List and praise from the School Library Journal and Kirkus. Impressive all around. (Bonus fact: She is a Dartmouth graduate.) ~ Lisa Christie

American Like Me: Reflections on Life Between Cultures Cover ImageAmerican Like Me: Reflections on Life Between Two Cultures by America Ferrera (2018) – A great and timely selection of essays about being an American immigrant or child of immigrants. Most of the essays address aspects of being a teen in the USA, providing a great “in” for most teens to the stories of these immigrants.  Plus, you will recognize a lot of the authors (e.g., Lin Manuel Miranda). ~ Lisa Christie

Picture Books for All Ages

In the Town All Year 'Round Cover ImageIn the Town All Year Round by Rotraut Susanne Berner (2008) – This is an older title that we somehow missed until recently. A sophisticated “Where’s Waldo” of the surprising things you find in town every day. A great way for kids and the adults who love them to discuss what people do day in and day out. ~ Lisa Cadow and Lisa Christie

Atlas of Adventures: A collection of natural wonders, exciting experiences and fun festivities from the four corners of the globe Cover ImageAtlas of Animal Adventures and Atlas of Dinosaur Adventures and Atlas of Adventure Wonders of the World by Lucy Letherland (assorted years) – Ms. Letherland wrote one of our favorite oversized picture books of all time – Atlas of Adventure. We are pretty certain we gifted it to just about every family we knew once we discovered it. And, we must say every family thanked us profusely for adding it to their collection. Thus, we were excited to see Ms. Letherland’s illustrations grace these other books. All of these books provide oversized, joyous illustrations and plenty of inspiration to learn more about a wide variety of places and topics. ~ Lisa Christie

More Traditional Picture Books

Harriet Gets Carried Away Cover ImageHarriet Gets Carried Away by Jessie Sima (2018) – AWESOME tale of imagination and love.  A little girl’s mission is simple – to find party hats; how she gets them so complicated. We also are hoping the fact her adventures include two dads and a lot of penguins is a shout out to And Tango Makes Three, a great picture book based upon an actual penguin at the Central Park Zoo with two dads. ~ Lisa Christie

Ada Twist, Scientist Cover ImageAda Twist Scientist by Andrea Beaty illustrated by David Roberts (2018) – Ada’s curiosity is unending and leads her to great big messes.  Doe sit also make her a great scientist?  We all can learn from Ada’s fearless explorations, and the rhymes and illustrations are fun. ~ Lisa Christie

City Cover ImageCity by Ingela P. Arrhenius (2018) – The bold, colorful, almost block-like pictures remind of us our favorite board book for toddlers – My Car by Byron Barton. Very few words and bold graphic illustrations make this the perfect oversized book for very young readers to share with the adults who love them. ~ Lisa Christie

 

Chapter Books for Kids to Read or Families to Read Aloud

The Adventures of a Girl Called Bicycle Cover ImageThe Adventures of a Girl Called Bicycle by Christina Uss (2018) – This delightful story of a girl who loves bicycles, is faced with a fate she does not want – friendship camp – and decides to take her life into her own hands and onto her favorite two wheels, has everything a great tale for kids should have – spirited heroine, a cookie-wielding sage, ghosts, quirky inventors, luck, a grand goal – bicycling across the country to meet her hero, and ultimately adults who help her seize her own destiny. Told in a perfectly sly manner with great humor and charm, this adventure book will leave every reader smiling. Thank you Ms. Beth (see below as well) for putting this in my hands.  ~ Lisa Christie

The Extraordinary Colors of Auden Dare Cover ImageThe Extraordinary Colors of Auden Dare by Zillah Bethell (2018) – Ms. Beth, our small town’s children’s librarian, put this in my hands and I honestly couldn’t believe that any book could live up to her hype. But, it charmed me completely. In this novel, a colorblind boy, Auden Dare lives in a future world where the scarcity of water is the cause of all wars.  Auden’s brilliant scientist uncle suddenly dies, leaving a home to Auden’s mother and notes outlining a mystery for Auden and Auden’s new friend Vivi. These notes lead them on an adventure they both needed and to a new friend, the mysterious robot Paragon. Together Vivi and Auden must solve the mystery that is Paragon and possibly save the world and their own families in the process. Auden, Paragon and Vivi will stay with you long after the last page. ~ Lisa Christie

Mascot Cover ImageMascot by Antony John (2018) – I laughed. I cried. I snorted from laughing and crying. And, I loved this book about baseball, horrific accidents (a dad dies and a son is in a wheelchair), rebuilding muscles and lives, friendships, parents who annoy, and middle school. I might even have to become a Cardinals fan. Reminiscent of my other favorite middle grades baseball novel Soar in its scope and its unflinching look at tough situations and how people can inspire as they face every obstacle. You will be so grateful you read this book. Or as Kirkus reviews says, “Noah’s dilemma is universal: the struggle to rebuild identity when what once defined us no longer exists. Highlights the challenges of adapting to puberty and sudden disability at the same time.” ~ Lisa Christie

Speechless Cover ImageSpeechless by Adam P. Schmidt (2018) – This tale of Jimmy, a middle school aged boy tasked with giving the eulogy for his “very hard to love” cousin, is a superb way to think about all the “hard to love” people we encounter as we go through life and what we may do to be better as a result. The fact Jimmy’s suit is way to small and buttons are threatening to pop at any moment is one of many small details that Mr. Schmidt uses with great skill to make the characters, their issues, and the whole plot real. A great debut novel that will have you thinking at its close. Note: this novel addresses alcoholism, tragic accidents, abuse. ~ Lisa Christie

Wallpaper Deer New year Lantern Star decoration Christmas tree Snow Berry Branches Pine cone Holidays Boards 3840x2400 Christmas New Year tree Conifer cone Wood planks

 

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Here in Vermont we are benefitting from a blizzard of recommendations of books for kids and young adults this holiday season. What is our source? Well, two BOOK BUZZes over the course of two days means that numerous students from area schools presented their favorite books to read, give, and get. On Friday we posted the selections from the middle school students at Crossroads Academy, today we post the selections from students from our own Norwich elementary school, the Marion Cross School.

We hope you (and the kids you need to shop for) enjoy the selections from these students. Their names and grades are listed at the end of this post.

The Secret of Platform 13 Cover ImageLast Day on Mars (Chronicle of the Dark Star #1) Cover ImageThe Unicorn in the Barn Cover Image

Books for your friends who don’t like to read but who would love a great story

The Serpent's Secret (Kiranmala and the Kingdom Beyond #1) Cover Image

Superb books you would assign to your favorite adult (teacher, aunt, parent) as required reading

  • The Serpent’s Secret by Sayantani DasGupta (2018). Selected by Hannah. Another dimension with a hidden adventure.

Iron Hearted Violet Cover ImageThe Little Prince Cover Image

Best family read-alouds

  • Iron Hearted Violet by Kelly Barnhill (2012). Selected by Twyla. Best friends, dragon, mirrored sky, war.
  • The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry (1942). Selected by Mr. Bill. A little philosopher ponders life’s mysteries.

The One and Only Ivan Cover ImageWaiting for the Magic Cover Image

Perfect books to help you ignore the fact you are waiting for your sister or brother to finish hockey practice

  • The One and Only Ivan by Katherine Applegate (2012). Selected by Gavin. Silver-back Ivan and Elephant Stella.
  • Waiting for the Magic by Patricia MacLachlan (2011). Selected by Mrs. French. Four dogs help family find comfort.

Who Is the Dalai Lama? (Who Was?) Cover ImageWho Is Jane Goodall? (Who Was?) Cover Image

Fun non-fiction books for kids who prefer TRUE stories

Refugee Cover Image

Fiction Books that do a great job of teaching history

  • Refugee by Alan Gratz (2017). Selected by Penelope. Three kids, all refugees, different times.

I Will Always Write Back: How One Letter Changed Two Lives Cover ImageGrandpa's Great Escape Cover ImageAll's Faire in Middle School Cover Image

GREAT Books to give to your friends for their birthdays

Ballpark Mysteries #6: The Wrigley Riddle Cover Image

The BEST Book to give to your younger brother or sister because it was your favorite in 2nd grade

Mascot Cover ImageThe Contract (Jeter Publishing) Cover Image

Sports books that are about so much more

  • Mascot by Antony John (2018). Selected by Jacobi. Kid in wheelchair. Out with Fredbird.
  • The Contract Series by Derek Jeter (Assorted Years). Selected by Joe. A dad, a bully, & a nothing.

Otis and Will Discover the Deep: The Record-Setting Dive of the Bathysphere Cover Image

Picture Books to read with your reading buddy (or younger sister or brother)

The Apothecary (The Apothecary Series #1) Cover ImageThe Zodiac Legacy: Balance of Power Cover ImageFriday Barnes, Girl Detective (Friday Barnes Mysteries #1) Cover ImageCalvin and Hobbes Cover Image

A series you won’t be able to put down, or what to read when you run out of Wimpy Kid books

  • The Apothecary Series by Maile Meloy (Assorted Years). Selected by Adeline. Potions! Flying! Chemistry! Stop the Bomb!
  • Zodiac Legacy by Stan Lee (Assorted Years). Selected by Benjamin. Zodiac Powers Return After 144 years.
  • Friday Barnes, Girl Detective by R. A. Spratt (Assorted Years). Selected by Milly. Smart girl detective solves crazy mysteries.
  • Calvin and Hobbes by Bill Watterson (Assorted Years). Selected by Daniil. Calvin and Hobbes Never Grow Old.

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The Marion Cross presenters

4th grade

  • Drew
  • Ally
  • Harrison
  • Joe
  • Addy
  • Roxy

5th grade

  • Wyatt
  • Twyla
  • Milly
  • Daniil
  • Jacobi

6th grade

  • Penelope
  • Campbell
  • Benjamin
  • Gavin
  • Lucy
  • William
  • Hannah

Adults

  • Mr. Bill (Thank you Mr. Bill for your support of BOOK BUZZ and the MCS students always.)
  • Mrs. McCaull (Thank you Mrs. McCaull for all your help coaching the students. BOOK BUZZ would not happen without you.)
  • Mrs. French (Thank you Mrs. French – and the 4th, 5th and 6th grade teams – for your support of BOOK BUZZ; teachers like you make a huge difference.)

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Once again, students in a local K-8 school – Crossroads Academy – helped us find GREAT books to give to kids and teens (and adults honestly) this holiday season. Their presentations during BOOK BUZZ were superb, and their book selections should help all of us cross some of our holiday shopping needs off our lists. Thanks to the generosity of the Norwich Bookstore, they also raised some money for their library.

We hope you enjoy their selections.

Sparkers Cover ImageEverything I Know About You Cover ImageSpy School Goes South Cover Image

Books for your friends who don’t like to read but who would love a great story

Emily Dickinson Poems Cover ImageThe Indispensable Calvin and Hobbes Ppb Cover ImageTwenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea Cover Image

Superb books you would assign to your favorite adult (teacher, aunt, parent) as required reading

The Only Girl in School: A Wish Novel Cover ImageWhere the Sidewalk Ends Special Edition with 12 Extra Poems: Poems and Drawings Cover ImageTisha: The Wonderful True Love Story of a Young Teacher in the Alaskan Wilderness Cover Image

Best family read-alouds

  • The Only Girl in School by Natalie Standiford (2016). Selected by Mia. An adventurous novel full of friendship.
  • Where the Sidewalk Ends by Shel Silverstein (1974). Selected by Brynne. Poetry for children and adults alike.
  • Tisha by Robert Specht (1976). Selected by Hannah. A determined teacher in snowy Alaska.

Mascot Cover Image

Sports books that are about so much more

  • Mascot by Antony John (2018). Selected by Lisa. Accident changes all. Cardinals, friends help.

Hoot Cover ImageA Mango-Shaped Space Cover ImageThe Hunger Games Cover ImageStargirl Cover Image

Perfect books to help you ignore the fact you are waiting for your sister or brother to finish hockey practice

  • Hoot by Carl Hiaasen (2004). Selected by Rhys. Mystery of a boy saving habitat.
  • A Mango-Shaped Space by Wendy Mass (2003). Selected by Natalie. Girl with synesthesia copes with challenges.
  • The Hunger Games Series by Susan Collins (Assorted years). Selected by Hannah. Extreme dystopian world. I love it!
  • Stargirl by Jerry Spinelli (2000). Selected by Mia. Stargirl! A book full of love.

 

Sky Raiders (Five Kingdoms #1) Cover ImageThe Stonekeeper (Amulet #1) Cover ImageThe Penderwicks: A Summer Tale of Four Sisters, Two Rabbits, and a Very Interesting Boy Cover ImageThe Black Mage: Apprentice Cover Image

A series you won’t be able to put down, or what to read when you run out of Wimpy Kid books

  • The Five Kingdom Series by Brandon Mull (Assorted years). Selected by Rhys. Thrilling, fantasy, search for lost friends.
  • Amulet Series by Kazu Kibuishi (Assorted years). Selected by Jai. Trapped in darkness, can they escape?
  • The Penderwicks Series by Jeanne Birdsall (Assorted years). Selected by Thea. Heartwarming books filled with adventure and joy!
  • Black Mage Series by Rachel E. Carter (Assorted years). Selected by Eleanor. Magical competition. Love defeated. Last stand.

The Fault in Our Stars Cover Image

Books that are sad, but really, really good

The Invention of Wings: A Novel Cover ImageThe Brothers Karamazov: A Novel in Four Parts With Epilogue Cover ImageThe Parker Inheritance Cover Image
Fiction Books that do a great job of teaching history

  • The Invention of Wings by Sue Monk Kidd (2014). Selected by Laura. Two women. Same beliefs. Different paths.
  • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoyevsky (1879). Selected by Daniel. Russian saga about brothers’ tumultuous relationships.
  • The Parker Inheritance by Varian Johnson (2018). Selected by Lisa. Civil rights. Buried treasure? New friend.

The Lord of the Rings Deluxe Edition Cover Image
GREAT Books to give to your friends for their birthday

  • The Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien (Assorted Years). Selected by Gael .One hobbit to save the Middle-earth.

Not Quite Narwhal Cover ImageRescue and Jessica: A Life-Changing Friendship Cover Image

Picture Books to read with your reading buddy (or younger sister or brother)

  • Not Quite Narwhal by Jessie Sima (2018). Selected by Ms. Brodsky. Unicorn born Narwhal. Discovers is unicorn.
  • Rescue and Jessica by Jessica Kensky (2018). Selected by Ms. Brodsky. Girl and dog. Love and teamwork.

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The Crossroads Presenters

Grade 6

  • Hannah
  • Jai
  • Laura
  • Natalie

Grade 7

  • Rhys
  • Thea

Grade 5

  • Mia
  • Gael

Grade 8

  • Brynne
  • Daniel
  • Eleanor

Librarian

  • Ms. Brodsky

THANK YOU!

best christmas jumper jingle my bells

 

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The snow stopped falling long enough for a lucky portion (we sold out yet again) of the Upper Valley reading public to attend the seventh annual Pages in the Pub: Holiday Edition in Norwich. We thank the terrific Norwich Bookstore for their generous donation of 20% of the evening sales to the stupendous Norwich Public Library, the Norwich Inn for hosting us, the terrific presenters (Lucinda, Penny, and Rob) for their work, enthusiasm, and the donation of their time, and all those who attended for once again making Pages in the Pub an incredibly fun evening.

This post lists all books discussed during the evening, each with a special six-word review written by the presenter, and each with a link to a longer review at the Norwich Bookstore web site. You’ll notice that the selections are divided into rather specific categories to make browsing and gift-giving easier. And, please note their are gift ideas for every age and genre preference. We hope this list helps your cross off some of your holiday shopping, including maybe a gift or two for yourself. Bios of the fabulous presenters can be found at the very end of this list.

Quiet Cover ImageNight Play Cover Image

For kids & for families to read together

  • Quiet by Tomie dePaola (2018). Selected by Penny. Peace, Happiness, Family, Contemplative, Just be.
  • Night Play by Lizi Boyd (2018). Selected by Lisa Christie. At night, stuffies play. Festive cutouts.

Anna, Banana, and the Sleepover Secret Cover ImageHarbor Me Cover Image

For middle grade & middle school readers, those beyond Tonka trucks and tea parties but not ready for teen topics

American Like Me: Reflections on Life Between Cultures Cover Image

For your favorite ’tween & teen thinking about how to be an amazing adult

  • American Like Me by America Ferrara (2018). Selected by Lisa Christie. Famous voices find identity, place. Heartfelt/heartening.

The Maze at Windermere: A Novel Cover ImageThe Great Believers Cover ImageWhere the Crawdads Sing Cover ImageWhere We Live Cover ImageOn Brassard's Farm Cover ImageThe Cabin at the End of the World: A Novel Cover Image

For anyone who just needs an engrossing novel to help them recover from the news

  • The Maze at Windermere by Gregory Blake Smith (2018). Selected by Rob. A timeless tale of Newport, RI.
  • The Great Believers by Rebecca Makkai (2018). Selected by Lucinda. ’80s heartbreak leads to present survival.
  • Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens (2018). Selected by Lisa Cadow. Naturalist writes lyrical southern novel-mystery.
  • Where We Live by W D Wetherell (2018). Selected by Penny. Incredible plots; strong writing; interesting characters.
  • On Brassard’s Farm by Daniel Hecht (2018). Selected by Lucinda. Vermont dairy farm provides life lessons.
  • The Cabin at the End of the World by Paul Tremblay (2018). Selected by Rob. What would you do to survive?

Apéritif: Cocktail Hour the French Way Cover ImageNow & Again: Go-To Recipes, Inspired Menus  + Endless Ideas for Reinventing Leftovers Cover ImageOttolenghi Simple: A Cookbook Cover ImageSalt, Fat, Acid, Heat: Mastering the Elements of Good Cooking Cover Image

For people who like to cook up a culinary snowstorm

  • Aperitif by Rebekah Peppler (2018). Selected by Lisa Cadow. Serve hors d’oeuvres like a Parisian.
  • Now and Again by Julia Turshen (2018). Selected by Lisa Cadow. Activist makes hip food and leftovers fun.
  • Ottolenghi Simple by Yotam Ottolenghi (2018). Selected by Penny. Simple, unique, quick, delicious, inspired flavors.
  • Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat by Samin Nosrat (2017). Selected by Lucinda. Your taste buds will thank you!

Educated: A Memoir Cover ImageHow to Be a Good Creature: A Memoir in Thirteen Animals Cover Image

For people who enjoy living vicariously through other people’s memories

  • Educated by Tara Westover (2018). Selected by Lisa Cadow. Turbulent Idaho childhood, PhD from Cambridge.
  • How to be a Good Creature by Sy Montgomery (2018). Selected by Lisa Cadow. Animal friends impart powerful life lessons.

The Library Book Cover ImageSpying on Whales: The Past, Present, and Future of Earth's Most Awesome Creatures Cover ImageRising: Dispatches from the New American Shore Cover Image
For people who enjoy non-fiction or reference books while sitting by the woodstove

  • The Library Book by Susan Orlean (2018). Selected by Penny. Books, fires, libraries, LA, entertaining, informative.
  • Spying on Whales by Nick Pyenson (2018). Selected by Rob. A deep dive into whale’s mystique.
  • Rising by Elizabeth Rush (2018). Selected by Penny. Coastal, climate, lyrical stories; not depressing.

A World of Cities Cover ImageBerlin Book One: City of Stones Cover ImageTrekking Beyond: Walk the world's epic trails Cover ImageThe Book of the Horse: Horses in Art Cover Image

For enjoyment by your hosts or coworkers – gifts for just about anyone!

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Our Amazing Presenters

Lucinda Walker has been the Director of the Norwich Public Library since (gasp!) 2002. In the words of Eloise, she “loves, loves, loves” her job, her colleagues and the Norwich community. In her free time she listens to podcasts (Ear Hustle, Heavy Weight and Everything is Alive are her current favorites), cries at the Great British Bake-off, skies in any kind of weather and drinks way too much dark-roasted coffee. Lucinda lives in Brownsville with her writer husband Peter and two awesome kids, Hartley & Lily.

Penny McConnel has been selling books for 39 years. She and Liza Bernard opened the Norwich Bookstore in August of 1994 and Penny although not working anyway near as many hours she did in the past, still can often be found behind the counter at the store or selling books at the many offsite events where the store travels. She lives in Norwich with husband Jim and spends her off time reading, knitting, gardening, cooking & dreaming of her next beach walk.

Rob Johnson is a Financial Advisor, loving husband to Alanya, and proud father of Bruce, a second grader at MCS. He is a Brazilian American who grew up in Florida, came to New England to see snow and never looked back! Rob is an avid reader and a #1 fan of the Norwich Bookstore. When not engrossed in a good book you can find Rob running around Norwich, coaching soccer, attending a Rec Council meeting, sharing a Vermont IPA with friends, and eating anything sweet.

Book Jam folks

Lisa Cadow is the co-founder of the Book Jam. When not reading or experimenting in her kitchen, she works as a health coach for Dartmouth Health Connect, an innovative primary care practice in Hanover, NH. She fervently believes that health outcomes would improve if doctors could prescribe books to patients as well as medicine. Lisa lives in Norwich with her husband, three cats, and a fun border collie and loves it when her three adult children visit.

Lisa Christie, co-founder of the Book Jam, was in previous times the Founder/Executive Director of Everybody Wins! Vermont and USA, literacy programs that help children love books. She currently works as a part-time non-profit consultant, part-time Dartmouth graduate student, and all-the-time believer in the power of books. She lives in Norwich with her musician husband, two superb sons, and a very large dog. She often dreams of travel.

 

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Related imageThe holiday bustle has begun, and time for reading has diminished a bit. Rather than give up entirely, we decided to review a few poetry collections that allow you to read a page or two, enjoy, and move on to your next errand. They might also make great gifts for someone on your list. (Perhaps one will become your holiday 2018 go-to hostess gift?) We added a two short story collections for those who just don’t like poems. And, we ensured all the books are available as paperbacks so that reading and gifting are both a bit easier on your wallet if needed.

Enjoy! And happy holidays!

Priest Turned Therapist Treats Fear of God: Poems Cover Image

Priest Turned Therapist Treats Fear of God: Poems by Tony Hoagland (2018) –  I would have picked this up for the title alone, but a recommendation from delightfully smart and poetry-loving Penny McConnel of the Norwich Bookstore meant I had to read it. She wanted to include it in her upcoming Pages in the Pub selections, but ran out of choices; so, I am happy to include it for her here. This collection contemplates human nature and modern culture with anger, humor, and humility. I honestly wanted to read this collection in one fell swoop and had to force myself to slow down and savor each poem. As The New York Times wrote, “Hoagland’s verse is consistently, and crucially, bloodied by a sense of menace and by straight talk.” ~ Lisa Christie

Devotions: The Selected Poems of Mary Oliver Cover ImageJust about ANY poetry collection by Mary Oliver (assorted years) – Few poets have perfected the art of poems for quiet contemplation as well as Ms. Oliver. Her perfectly placed words lend themselves to thoughts of nature and friendship and love. We could not pick our favorite volume, so we are just recommending you pick any collection and start reading, or gifting today. – Lisa Cadow and Lisa Christie

What Work Is: Poems Cover ImageWhat Work Is by Philip Levine (1991) – Mr. Levine, a recent US Poet Laureate famous for his work about working class Americans, pens poems crossing many class divides. This collection won the National Book Award. It was also reviewed by The Library Journal, “What Work Is ranks as a major work by a major poet . . . very accessible and utterly American in tone and language.”~ Lisa Cadow and Lisa Christie

Life on Mars: Poems Cover ImageLife on Mars by Tracy K. Smith (2011) – A book about race, power,  paternalism, and so much more. This pointed collection won the Pulitzer in 2012, but her overall body of work has received numerous starred reviews and this comment from Publishers Weekly, her “lyric brilliance and political impulses never falter”. ~ Lisa Christie

Sailing Alone Around the Room: New and Selected Poems Cover ImageSailing Alone Around the Room by Billy Collins (2002) – Known by many for his frequent appearances on Prairie Home Companion, former US Poet Laureate Mr. Collins manages to produce powerful poems while also greatly widening the circle of poetry’s audience with their accessibility. This volume collects many poems from previous works in one collection, and thus is a good place to start admiring his poetry. ~ Lisa Cadow and Lisa Christie

The Tsar of Love and Techno: Stories Cover ImageThe Tsar of Love and Techno by Anthony Marra (2015) – The author of the amazing novel A Constellation of Vital Phenomenon created this superb collection of short stories. Each connects in themes about the USSR/Russia from the Cold War through today. This collection received multiple accolades as one of the best books of 2015, and may provide insight into the news about Russia dominating today’s headlines. ~ Lisa Christie

Flying Lessons & Other Stories Cover ImageFlying Lessons & Other Stories edited by Ellen Oh. (2017). Because Kids need breaks from the holiday bustle as well, we wanted to include something for them.  This collection provides a great group of stories for kids. I love the stories themselves, and I love the fact the collection allows us all to read more diverse authors. I also greatly appreciate that these are great for reading aloud as a family, providing some reading joy for adults as well. ~ Lisa Christie

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Happy Thanksgiving week.

As the holiday season approaches, perhaps you are beginning to think about what to do when your guests arrive. Perhaps you need non-political topics to discuss. Maybe you need some new inspiration in the kitchen for all the meals you will be sharing. Perhaps you need a cooking activity for a few people to tackle together. Maybe you need things to entertain kids while adults talk. Maybe you need items that spark intergenerational conversations. Maybe you are the one visiting others and need a perfect gift for your hosts. Lucky for any of you with any of these needs, or anyone who just need some great gift giving ideas, we found a few oversized books with fun illustrations, and a few cookbooks with mouth watering recipes that can help. We truly believe all of these books will provide hours of entertainment for anyone perusing their pages. Enjoy!

Ottolenghi Simple: A Cookbook Cover ImageOttolenghi Simple by Yotam Ottolenghi (2018). This new book helps home cooks to live a flavorful kitchen dream! Believe it or not, these are Ottolenghi recipes with ten ingredients or less, most of which can be made in under a 45 minutes. From spending time with Ottolenghi’s  newest brilliant book I’ve learned that: one can lightly grill grapes on skewers (in a stovetop grill pan!) to accompany a silky burrata hors d’oeuvre plate, that zucchini loves to be served with peas (in a soup, on a platter sprinkled with oregano), and that butternut soup can come alive with curry and harrissa, and sprinkled with toasted pumpkin seeds. Believes me, the list goes on and on and on with enough new exciting dishes to try for throughout next year. Roasted Whole Cauliflower with Green Tahini Dip? Wow. So many of of his 300 pages of recipes are plant-based, verdantly vibrant, and infused with flavorful vegetables that meat actually takes a backseat – though, don’t despair, there are still two juicy chapters full of succulent fish, lamb, and chicken dishes. Please note that “Papardelle with Rose Harissa, Black Olives and Capers” just many eek out our family’s go-to, classic Marcella Hazan Spaghetti Bolognese recipe. ~Lisa Cadow

Apéritif: Cocktail Hour the French Way Cover ImageAperitif: Cocktail Hour the French Way by Rebekah Peppler (2018): If you’ve ever had the pleasure of dining chez les francais, the first thing you will notice is the elegant simplicity of their appetizers. They favor small, salty bites that please the palette and interesting, bubbly drinks which don’t fill up guests before the main course arrives. This book is bursting with observations and ideas that author Rebekah Peppler collected during her time living and dining in France. It features fresh simple recipes low-alcohol  drinks and high-taste appetizers that anyone who entertains should have in their repertoire such as simply fried potato chips, zippy marinated olives, cheese puffs. This book makes for the perfect, sophisticated hostess gift this season – and the next.  ~Lisa Cadow

A World of Cities Cover ImageA World of Cities by James Brown (2018): The pictures in this oversized book remind us of vintage travel posters. Their bold graphics inspire.  The fun facts sprinkled over each page provide many points for interesting discussions. The pages also give fun tidbits for all the fact-obsessed people throughout the world to add to their repertoire. The 30 dazzling cities Mr. Brown highlights should inspire even the most reluctant arm-chair traveller. Truly a gorgeous conversation starter, and a great gift! ~ Lisa Christie

Everything & Everywhere: A Fact-Filled Adventure for Curious Globe-Trotters Cover ImageEverything and Everywhere: A fact filled adventure for curious globe trotters by Marc Martin (2018): This journey around the world is crammed with busy pictures and words that discuss the things and people that make the places depicted unique. The pages almost leap with exuberance into the readers’ imaginations. A superb way to discover, or be reminded how interesting this world can be. ~ Lisa Christie

Happy Thanksgiving to all who celebrate that holiday this week; and, happy holidays to all.

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Books for Summer Camping: Kids and YA

It is that time of year: time for kids, young adults, and the adults who love them to read, read, read during these long summer days. Maybe it is because they have to for those back to school English assignments that loom in August and September.  Maybe it is because we all need some down time between summer activities. Or maybe it’s because vacation plans include long stretches of travel time that can not all be filled with electronic devices. Whatever the reason, we have compiled a list of books for Young Adults, kids who are reading chapter books, kids who are emerging readers, kids who are reluctant readers, kids who are not yet reading….  We hope somewhere in this list is the perfect book for the kids you love. (And honestly, we recommend all of them to adults as well.)

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YA: Young Adult fiction

FC9780062662804.jpgThe Poet X by Elizabeth Acevedo (2018) – Probably the best YA book I have read this year.  Reminiscent of Kwame Alexander’s style of telling stories in poetry, Ms. Acevedo uses poems to tease out the subtleties of her main character’s life in Brooklyn. In doing so has created a character – the fierce, gifted with words Xiomara Batista – who we care about, and whom we empathise with even if we are not a young black woman, even if we don’t live in Brooklyn, and even if our high school days are long behind us. The themes Ms. Acevedo intwines throughout this novel told in poems include, but are not limited to Latina culture, Catholicism, coming (or not) out, budding sexuality, high school teachers and curriculum, first romance, generation gaps, immigration, first gen issues, city life, poverty, music, and the power of words. Read this and rediscover the power of poetry, of youth, and of love – both first romance kind and the often much more complicated familial type. I find it hard to believe this was a first published novel for Ms. Acevedo; and, I thank children’s librarian extraordinaire Ms. Beth for bringing it to my attention. ~ Lisa Christie

FC9780062422651.jpgAllegedly by Tiffany Jackson (2018) – As a child, Mary B. Addison killed a baby. Or did she? The public thinks so and the many books and TV specials based upon her life definitely think so. However, maybe all is not as it seems. The answers didn’t matter until a teenaged Mary B. Addison is moved to a group home, gets pregnant, and wants to keep her baby. Ms. Jackson keeps you guessing as to Mary’s guilt or innocence throughout, but possibly most importantly, she shines a spotlight on the lives of young women and girls caught up in our legal system and prisons. ~ Lisa Christie

FC9780062422675.jpgMonday’s Not Coming by Tiffany Jackson (2018) – This novel takes on the heartbreaking reality of missing children of color, and does so with compassion and urgency. Monday Charles is missing and only her friend Claudia is concerned enough to do anything about it. Even well-meaning and caring teachers take too much time to hear Claudia’s concerns, and kind neighbors ignore signs something is amiss.  But, Claudia continues to be vocal that Monday is missing – even as she navigates high school placement tests and her shame that her learning disabilities are in the open.  Cleverly paced and plotted, and written with concern and compassion, Ms. Jackson highlights the fates of too many children of color in this country with a book teens and adults alike will be glad they read. Two books into her career, I am now officially a fan of this author and look forward to her next novel. ~ Lisa Christie

FC9780062330628.jpgFar From the Tree by Robin Benway (2017) – I loved this National Book Award Winner. The three bio siblings discover each other exists in their teens, when each is confronting a personal crisis in their adoptive and/or foster family. One is dealing with divorce and alcoholism, the other teen pregnancy, the third the foster system. They are all dealing with what it means to be family and how to become an adult.  Perfect really. ~ Lisa Christie

FC9781481438254.jpgA Long Way Down by Jason Reynolds (2017) – Mr. Reynolds tackles gun violence in an unique and powerful novel. The story unfolds in short bouts of powerful, insightful verse over the course of a 60 second elevator ride. During this ride, Will must decide whether or not to follow the RULES – No crying. No snitching. Revenge. – and kill the person he believes killed his brother Shawn. With this tale, Mr. Reynolds creates a place to understand the why behind the violence that permeates the lives of so many, and perhaps hopefully a place to think about how this pattern might end. ~ Lisa Christie

FC9781101939499.jpgDear Martin by Nic Stone (2017) – A superb YA novel about being profiled by police for being black, and how current events, BLM, and politics affect black youth today.  In this excellent debut novel, a black student – Justyce McAllister, top of his class, captain of the debate team, and set for the Ivy League next year – is handcuffed by a police officer and released without physical harm. The psychological toll of being profiled is explored as this novel delves into his life at his mostly white prep school and in his mostly black neighborhood. To help cope, Justyce researches the writings of MLK and writes him letters asking for guidance about how to live today. While Martin obviously never answers, the letters provide a great premise for thinking about how MLK would have handled life as a black man today. The letters also provide grounding once the novel’s action turns extremely ugly. Read it and discuss. (It could be considered the boy’s perspective on the situations in The Hate U Give reviewed below.) ~ Lisa Christie

FC9780062498533.jpgThe Hate U Give by Angie Thomas (2017) – Sometimes it takes a work of fiction to give life to current events. And sometimes it takes a book for children to give all of us a starting point for conversations about difficult issues. Ms. Thomas has done all of us a service by producing this fresh, enlightening, and spectacular book about the black lives lost at the hands of the police every year in the USA. Starr Carter, the teen she created to put faces on the statistics, straddles two worlds — that of her poor black neighborhood and  that of her exclusive prep school on the other side of town. She believes she is doing a pretty good job managing the differing realities of her life until she witnesses the fatal shooting of her childhood friend by a police officer. As a description of this book stated, The Hate U Give “addresses issues of racism and police violence with intelligence, heart, and unflinching honesty”.  Just as importantly, it is a great story, with fully formed characters who will haunt you, told by a gifted author.  Please read this one! ~ Lisa Cadow and Lisa Christie

FC9780545320696.jpgCurveball: The Year I lost my Grip by Jordan Sonnenblick (2016) – How does an amazing pitcher deal with the fact he will never pitch again while simultaneously navigating his freshman year of high school? Mr. Sonnenblick offers a compelling answer in this tale of friendship, first love and change. ~ Lisa Christie

FC9781250170972.jpgChildren of Blood and Bone by Tomi Adeyemi (2018) – A TERRIFIC start to a new series of magic and danger, palace intrigue and adventure, and love and hatred.  I won’t say more about the plot as I really want you to discover this one for yourself.  Please pick it up and just enjoy!  ~ Lisa Christie

 

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“Adult” Novels for Young Adults

FC9780316154529-1.jpgFC9780316025263.jpgInto the Beautiful North and The Hummingbird’s Daughter by Luis Alberto Urrea (assorted years) – I stumbled upon an interview with Mr. Urrea on NPR as I was linking our selections to the Norwich Bookstore’s Web site and was reminded how much I love Mr. Urrea’s tales, so I added this category to this post. (The Hummingbird’s Daughter made my most meaningful reads list.)  Mr. Urrea’s novels are funny, using humor to deflate explorations of horrific things (e.g., dangerous border crossings, poverty), and to explore wonderful things (e.g., love, family, friendships, movies).  Into the Beautiful North was reviewed by me previously as “the book Jon Stewart would have written if he ever wrote about crossing the Mexican border into the USA”. The fact these novels depict lives of Mexicans just adds a bonus during these times of immigration conflicts and politically polarizing actions at our southern border. ~ Lisa Christie

FC9780142001745.jpgThe Secret Life of Bees by Sue Monk Kidd (2002) – This book has been around for awhile and is a movie with genuine movie stars, but the fact a friend just discovered and read it, reminded us that we all miss good books when they are first published.  So we review it here 16 years after it first hit our bookshelves. This novel is a coming of age story for Lily, a girl in South Carolina in 1960s, whose mother’s death subtly haunts her and whose African-American nanny raises her. When her nanny insults town racists, Lily decides it is time for the two of them to run away.  The tale lovingly unfolds from there. Enjoy! ~ Lisa Cadow and Lisa Christie

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Poetry

I’m Just No Good At Rhyming by Chris Harris and illustrated by Lane Smith (2018) – Funny poems for kids and adults who love them. ~ Lisa Cadow and Lisa Christie

One Last Word by Nikki Grimes (2018) – Ms. Grimes takes a few of the many poems penned during the Harlem Renaissance, prints them, and uses them to create her own poems of response for each one. The poems depict the lives of kids today, and offer a bit of inspiration, understanding, and often humor. Terrific illustrations and art are sprinkled throughout, and short bios, with resources, are offered for each featured poet and artist. ~ Lisa Christie

For Everyone by Jason Reynolds (2018) – This “advice book” is different and simple and profound and lovely.  Most importantly to me it shows Mr. Reynolds’ large heart and powerful prose.  A great gift for kids who may be worried about the upcoming school year. ~ Lisa Christieimages-2.jpg

Nonfiction

FC9780062748539.jpgNotorius RBG by Irin Carmon and Shana Knizhnik (2018) – This was the perfect counterpoint for me to absorb last winter/spring after another school shooting. Why you may ask? Well, it reminded me that there are fabulous people out there in high places looking out for people who don’t have voices. It also provided a superb look at the life of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. It would also be an excellent primer to read before seeing RBG in theaters. ~ Lisa Christie

FC9781481463713.jpgThe Distance Between Us: YA version by Reyna Grande (2016) – This book seems especially important with the recent talk separations of families along the US border and burgeoning hatred towards illegal immigrants. Ms. Grande has adapted her adult memoir for young adults; in it, she tells of her life as a toddler in an impoverished town in Mexico, her three attempts to cross into the USA with a coyote as a young child, her life in LA as an illegal immigrant, how her family gained legal status, and how she managed college. This is not for the faint hearted due to themes of physical abuse and complicated relationships with parents who are always leaving. But it is important to be informed, and this book will put faces on any political discussions about immigration that the teens in your life might encounter. ~ Lisa Christie

FC9781603093002.jpgMarch: Books One, Two and Three by John Lewis, Andrew Aydin and Nate Powell (assorted years) –  John Lewis, the Congressman and man who worked with Martin Luther King, Jr., has, with two collaborators, written a memoir in the form of a graphic novel. This series begins with his childhood in rural Alabama and follows Mr. Lewis through meeting Martin Luther King and then his own student activist days in Nashville, and into his life as a Congressman. The pictures explore how his life must have felt during each moment in time.  The prose explains what he was thinking as each of the momentous moments of his life unfolds.  The 1958 comic book Martin Luther King and the Montgomery Story was inspirational to Mr. Lewis and other student activists.  We hope March series proves as inspiring to future leaders.  ~ Lisa Christie and Lisa Cadow

FC9780448467108.jpgWho is? What Was? Series by assorted authors (assorted years) – We really can not recommend these books highly enough for emerging readers and beyond. The topics are varied, the illustrations humorous, and the information fascinating (e.g., did you know that King Henry VIII was so large he fell out of his coffin?). ~ Lisa Christie and Lisa Cadow

FC9780446677554.jpgCounting Coup by Larry Colton (2001) – Mr. Colton journeys into the world of a group of Crow Indians living in Montana, and follows the struggles of a talented, moody, charismatic young woman basketball player named Sharon. This book far more than just a sports story – it exposes Native Americans as long since cut out of the American dream.

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Kids

FC9781484746431.jpgBurning Maze: The Trials of Apollo Book Three (and other seriesby Rick Riordan (2018) – Once again Mr. Riordan delivers a wry adventurous tale of Greek and Roman Gods and their offspring. In this outing, the former god Apollo, cast down to earth by Zeus, is an awkward mortal teen named Lester Papadopoulos. Te become a god again, Lester must restore five Oracles that have gone dark and do so without the help of his godly powers and while bound in servitude to a cranky demigod named Meg. Things get more complicated from there. ~ Lisa Cadow (seconding the recommendations Mr. Riordan’s previous series as she has not yet read this one) and Lisa Christie

FC9780525429203.jpgFC9780803740815-1.jpgThe War I Finally Won (2018) and The War that Saved My Life (2015) by Kimberly Brubaker Bradley — The War I Finally Won, the follow-up to Ms. Bradley’s first book about Ada and her family, shows Ada just as feisty as she was in her debut. It also brings home the realities of war for everyone in the British countryside. This time heroes who are close friends die while defending Britian and her allies, rationing is tough, code breakers are introduced, prejudices against Germans spill over to refugee children, and personal lives continue to influence outcomes – even as the war intensifies. As I wrote before about The War that Saved My Life, when Gary Schmidt (one of my favorite authors) blurbs a book with the words “I read this in two big gulps” I pay attention. The initial tale about two of the many children who were sent from London to the countryside for safety (think The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe – which we also recommend) is also full of adventure, hardship, and ultimately love. In both novels, I especially loved Ada and here feisty fight for her place in the world. Please read them both! ~ Lisa Christie

FC9780062499660.jpgSecret Sisters of the Salty Sea by Lynne Rae Perkins (2018) – Since Liza Bernard of the Norwich Bookstore put this book in our hands we will let her review speak for its selection in this list. “Sisters Alix and Jools, along with their parents, spend a summer week at the beach. We have the pleasure of experiencing the sea for the first time through their eyes – and ears and hopes and fears! A refreshingly wonderful interlude in the otherwise tumultuous array of chapter books written for this age group. No parent dies, no one is abused, there are no floods: just caring and sharing, learning and growing with wonder about the world around them.” We now add, it is a perfect pick for anyone wanting to remember that there is magic in the ordinary day, and how great vacations can be. ~ Lisa Cadow and Lisa Christie

FC9780763681173.jpgRaymie Nightingale by Kate DiCamillo (2016) – Ms. Camillo returns to 1970s Florida and creates a superb tale of three young girls who discover each other and themselves over the course of a summer.  The plot centers around Raymie’s plan to bring her father, who left town two days ago with a dental hygienist, back — she will win the Little Miss Central Florida Tire competition, get her picture in the paper and remind him he needs to come home. First though she must learn to twirl a baton and defeat the two other girls in her lessons. Delightful. ~ Lisa Christie

FC9780451470348.jpgSoar by Joan Bauer (2016) – Many years ago, we fell in love with Ms. Bauer’s Newbery Honor Medal Winner Hope Was Here. But we haven’t read much of her work since. We corrected this awhile back when one of the Book Jam Lisas could not put Ms. Bauer’s latest novel – Soar – down, finishing it in one long swoop. Ms. Bauer’s main character and narrator of this tale – Jeremiah, is a heart transplant recipient and the world’s biggest baseball fan. He may not be able to play (yet) due to his transplant, but he sure can coach. And, he is just what his middle school needs after a huge high school sports scandal breaks his new hometown. Infused with humor, baseball trivia, and a lovely adoption sub-plot, this book is all about grit, hard work, and determination. It also does an amazing job of reminding readers that kids can be truly amazing people. We love all the books listed for this post, and we admit that some of Soar could be construed as corny, but we recommend it as an excellent (and possibly necessary) break from today’s politics. ~ Lisa Cadow and Lisa Christie

FC9781101934593.jpgFlying Lessons and Other Stories edited by Ellen Oh (2017) – Ms. Oh, the founder of We Need Diverse Books, has edited a collection of short stories by authors who happen to be persons of color. The group has earned among them every major award in children’s publishing as well as popularity as New York Times bestsellers. Each story is completely unrelated to the rest and totally fabulous. This collection is perfect for a reluctant reader as one of these stories is sure to be just right. (My bet is on the one by Kwame Alexander.) And as a collection it makes a great family read aloud. ~ Lisa Cadow and Lisa Christie

FC9780803738393.jpgThe Best Man by Richard Peck (2016) – This may be the best book I read last year. Mr. Peck’s superb sense of humor and his ability to remember what it is like to be a kid make this tale a memorable, smile-inducing novel. Somehow, without preaching, he manages to cover gay marriage, death, divorce, war, national guard service, reconciliation, bullying, bad teachers, social media, hormones, school lunches, middle school, the British Empire, and the Cubs, all in a tale about being a kid in the 21st Century.  Read it today; no matter your age, you will not be sorry. ~ Lisa Christie

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Older titles that are still great, because there are always kids who just turned 8 or 10 or …

FC9781416949329.jpgFC9780689818769.jpgFrindle or Trouble-Maker or other titles by Andrew Clements – Mr. Clements is a former school principal and his love of kids – especially the ones who end up in the principal’s office – comes through in each of his books. He treats kids with humor and compassion and presents many real world dilemmas in each of his books for young readers. Pick one up and enjoy. ~ Lisa Cadow and Lisa Christie

FC9780689817212.jpgFC9780689711817.jpgAnything – and we mean ANYTHING – by E.L. Konigsburg (assorted years) – Ms. Konigsburg was truly a superb gift to young readers everywhere. Her books are fun, well-written, humorous, and help kids work through the issues they face every day.  Our favorites – The Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E Frankweiler and The View from Saturday. But please discover your own. ~ Lisa Cadow and Lisa Christie

FC9780689844454.jpgFC9781534420113.jpgKing of Shadows by Susan Cooper (1999) – Nat is thrilled to join an American drama troupe traveling to London to perform A Midsummer Night’s Dream in the famous Globe Theater. However, after being taken ill, he is transported 400 years to an earlier London, Will Shakespeare, and another production of the play. History, time travel, adventure, and family all propel this tale.~ Lisa Cadow and Lisa Christie (also reviewed in Books for Summer Campers and Classics for Kids).  And, The Boggart by Susan Cooper (1993) – When Emily’s and Jess’s family inherits a Scottish castle, they travel to explore. Unbeknownst to them they also inherit a Boggart — an invisible, mischievous spirit who’s been playing tricks on residents of their castle for generations. When they accidentally trap the boggart in their belongings and take him back to Toronto, nothing will ever be the same. ~ Lisa Cadow and Lisa Christie

FC9780803740013.jpgUnder the Egg by Laura Marx Fitzgerald (March 2014) – We agree with Publishers Weekly assessment – “Fans of From the Mixed Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler will find this another delightful lesson in art history.” In this novel, Theodora Tenpenny of Manhattan tries to solve the mystery of a painting she uncovers (literally) once her grandfather dies. It includes her eccentric mother who has spent at least fifteen years doing nothing but completing her mathematical dissertation and consuming very expensive tea.  It also shows how two amazing, but lonely girls can make great friends. And, along the way it introduces young readers to the world of art and the importance of asking for help when you need it.  Not bad for an author’s first children’s book. ~ Lisa Christie and Lisa Cadow

FC9780375872921.jpgWill In Scarlet by Matthew Cody (2013) – An EXCELLENT and FUN tale of Robin Hood and his merry men before they became famous.  In this version of this timeless tale, you meet them as a gang of outlaws and watch them find their mission in life.  A superb adventure for any middle grades reader and the adults who love them, or who love English legends. ~ Lisa Christie

FC9780547237602.jpgFC9780544022805.jpgThe Wednesday Wars (2007) and OK For Now (2011) by Gary Schmidt – These two books provide an excellent introduction to this era and some of the topics of the 60s and 70s – Vietnam, the women’s movement, environmentalism. They also tackle school bullies, poverty, joblessness, great teachers and hope. Both provide memorable characters in extremely moving moments. Both were award winners – OK For Now was a National Book Award Finalist and The Wednesday Wars was a Newberry Honor Book. Previously reviewed in Classics for children, young adults, and the adults who love them.

FC9780544570986.jpgBooked and The Crossover by Kwame Alexander (assorted years) – Yes, we love Mr. Alexander’s books. Yes, we have recommended both these books before. But trust us, the youth readers you love will love these books about soccer (Booked) and basketball (The Crossover). They are poetic,perfect for reluctant readers, and both address how life happens while you have your eye on the ball. (Also reviewed in Sports Books That are About So Much More and Classics for children, young adults, and the adults who love them.)

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Some Series for Kids Just Branching out of Early Readers and Needing Beginning Chapter Books

Calendar Mysteries by Ron Roy (assorted years) – Four young children – Bradley, Brian, Nate and Lucy (younger relatives of the A to Z Mystery kids) – continually unearth problems that need to be solved as they travel the roads and playgrounds of their home town. ~ Lisa Christie and Lisa Cadow

Capital Mysteries by Ron Roy (assorted years) – Pre-teens KC and Marshall uncover bad guys and save the world from their homes in Washington, DC.  KC’s home just happens to be the White House. ~ Lisa Christie

BallPark Mysteries by David Kelley (assorted years) – Two kids travel the country attending baseball games (one of their moms is a sports reporter) and solving mysteries. Reminiscent of those original “meddling kids” – Scooby’s gang. ~ Lisa Christie

Magic Tree House Series by Mary Pope Osborne (assorted years) – This seems to be the original model for this genre. It now bring over 50 titles with the adventures of young siblings Jack and Annie and their time-traveling adventures in their magic treehouse to young readers everywhere. ~ Lisa Cadow and Lisa Christie

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Picture Books

Otis and Will Discover the Deep by Barb Rosenstock and Katherine Roy (2018) – I am really claustrophobic and yet was still fascinated by this story of the first people to envision and build a device to explore the ocean’s depths.  And yes, Ms. Roy’s illustrations still have me feeling a bit dizzy, but the tale of these two boys who became the men who invented the Bathysphere is worth a bit of discomfort; it will also appeal to the adventurers, inventors, and explorers in all of us (even if only vicariously). We discovered Ms. Roy through her first illustrations in SS Taylor’s Expeditioners series; this provides us a perfect excuse to recommend SS Taylor’s series for kids who need a good chapter book or family read aloud. ~ Lisa Christie

7 ate 9 by Tara Lazar (2017) – Good puns are never done.  Clever Noir picture book playing on a classic preschool joke/pun. ~ Lisa Christie

Duck Mouse Wolf by Mac Barnett (2017) – SUPERB fun tale of interspecies cooperation and making the best of a situation. ~ Lisa Cadow and Lisa Christie

What Can a Citizen Do? by Dave Eggers (2018) –  Picture books for young activists and the adults who love them. ~ Lisa Christie

a house that once was by Julie Fogliano and illustrated by Lane Smith (2018) – Awesome illustrations by Mr. Lane provide a great opening into this book about what makes a home and how a kid’s imagination is THE BEST. A winner of a picture book. ~ Lisa Cadow and Lisa Christie

Harriet Gets Carried Away by Jessie Sima (2018) – AWESOME tale of imagination and love.  A little girl’s mission is simple – to find party hats; how she gets them so complicated. We also are hoping the fact her adventures include two dads and a lot of penguins is a shout out to And Tango Makes Three, a great picture book based upon an actual penguin at the Central Park Zoo with two dads. ~ Lisa Christie

Alfie by Thyra Heder (2018) – This picture book shows how there are two sides to every story.  In the first we see Nia’s perspective of how her beloved, but rather boring turtle Alfie disappears one day. In the second we see Alfie’s perspective of why. Bonus: All the action revolves around birthday parties, which we know kids love to talk about. ~ Lisa Christie

Ada Twist Scientist by Andrea Beaty illustrated by David Roberts (2018) – Ada’s curiosity is unending and leads her to great big messes.  Doe sit also make her a great scientist?  We all can learn from Ada’s fearless explorations, and the rhymes and illustrations are fun. ~ Lisa Christie

We also recommend you visit our previous summer reading picks for YA and kids.

 

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