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Well yes, the Book Jam Lisas have “gone reading” and are not posting new reviews until late September. However, sometimes we interrupt our reading to post because of a great opportunity for people to meet a special author. Thus, we are inserting a special “3 Questions” into our “gone reading” break.

This special “3 Questions” features Ricardo Siri, perhaps better known by his middle name Liniers, an artist-in-residence at the Center for Cartoon Studies in White River Junction, Vermont. A native of Argentina, Liniers now lives in our hometown with his wife and three young daughters. His cartoons periodically appear in the New Yorker, as well as in his own books.

Liniers appears at the Norwich Bookstore on Saturday, September 9th from 10 am to noon for a book signing and to speak about Good Night, Planet, his new book for young readers. This graphic novel spins a tale of what toys do when their people go to sleep. Reviewers have said:

  • “There are plenty of stories about what toys get up to at night, but this quiet, masterfully executed comic is particularly enchanting.” –Booklist, starred review
  • “Liniers continues his run of clever comics for kids, with a fun adventure and panels full of easy-to-follow action. Delightful.” –Kirkus, starred review

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Reservations are not required for this event, but plan to arrive early as the Norwich Bookstore is certain to be a popular place to be on Saturday morning due to Linier’s visit. For additional information call the Norwich Bookstore at 802-649-1114.

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1.What three books have helped shape you into the writer/artist you are today, and why?
The Catcher in the Rye, It (Stephen King), and Maus (Art Spiegelman), because they are funny and human, and I wanted to keep seeing the characters after I had put the book down.

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2.What author (living or dead) would you most like to have a cup of coffee with and why?
Stephen King. He’s the best storyteller I know; and, I love storytelling and its immense power throughout the history of mankind.

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3.What books are currently on your bedside table?
The Underground Railroad, Jackson Pollockand It by Stephen King.

NOTE: As part of our mission to promote authors, the joy of reading, and to better understand the craft of writing and the living of life, we’ve paired with the The Norwich Bookstore in Norwich, Vermont to present an ongoing series entitled “3 Questions”. In it, we pose three questions to authors with upcoming visits to the bookstore or bookstore related venues. Their responses are posted on The Book Jam during the days leading up to their engagement. Our hope is that this exchange will offer insight into their work and will encourage readers to both attend these special author events and read their books.

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As part of our mission to promote authors, the joy of reading, and to better understand the craft of writing and the living of life, we’ve paired with the The Norwich Bookstore in Norwich, Vermont to present an ongoing series entitled “3 Questions”. In it, we pose three questions to authors with upcoming visits to the bookstore. Their responses are posted on The Book Jam during the days leading up to their engagement. Our hope is that this exchange will offer insight into their work and will encourage readers to both attend these special author events and read their books.

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Today, we feature Michele Campbell and her thriller It’s Always the Husband. Ms. Campbell, a New York native and resident of the Upper Valley, has taught law at the Vermont Law School and served as a federal prosecutor in New York City.  Ms. Campbell is a graduate of Harvard University and Stanford Law School.

Ms. Campbell will appear at the Norwich Bookstore at 7 pm on Wednesday, May  31st to discuss It’s Always the Husband. Reservations are recommended as they expect seats to “sell out”. Call 802-649-1114 or email info@norwichbookstore.com to reserve your seat.

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1. What three books have helped shape you into the author you are today, and why?

As a girl, I read The Witch of Blackbird Pond by Elizabeth George Speare and Little Women by Louisa May Alcott on repeat. I would literally finish the last page of these books and start over with the first. Both books had strong female protagonists who struggled to navigate the stifling expectations set for girls in their time and place, and had loving yet complicated relationships with their female family members. In high school, The Great Gatsby, with its impeccable prose and focus on issues of social class, caught my imagination. These three books shaped my interest in writing crime stories that explore issues of women, society and social class.

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2. What author (living or dead) would you most like to have a cup of coffee with and why?

Margaret Atwood. The Handmaid’s Tale and The Blind Assassin are two of the greatest books written in my lifetime, and I’ve read them both numerous times. She is astonishingly prolific, and I would love to ask her about the glorious span of her career – how she writes, how she manages so many projects, and how she moves, seemingly effortlessly, between genres. Ultimately, I just think she would be inspiring to talk to. She’s a visionary, a feminist, someone with a dark sense of humor and refreshingly strong opinions. I love her.

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3. What books are currently on your bedside table?

How much space do I have to tell you about all the wonderful books in my TBR pile? Like many writers, I’m a book hoarder. Between my actual, physical nightstand and my e-reader, I have enough books to keep me busy for months, if not years, to come. Some current notables: The Gunslinger by Stephen King, The Woman in Cabin 10 by Ruth Ware, Chronicle of a Death Foretold by Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Where It Hurts by Reed Farrell Coleman, Quiet Neighbors by Catriona McPherson, The God of Small Things by Arundhati Roy and A Passage to India by E.M. Forster.

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This “3 Questions” features Michelle Hoover, author of Bottomland. Ms. Hoover is the Fannie Hurst Writer-in-Residence at Brandeis University and teaches at GrubStreet, where she leads the Novel Incubator program. She is a 2014 NEA Fellow and has been a MacDowell Fellow and a winner of the PEN/New England Discovery Award. Her debut, The Quickening, was a 2010 Massachusetts Book Award “Must Read.” She is a native of Iowa and lives in Boston.
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Ms. Hoover will visit the Norwich Bookstore at 7 pm on March 30th to discuss her latest book, Bottomland, a novel based loosely on an unearthed family secret. The book follows the Hess family as they settles on Iowa farmland hoping to escape anti-German sentiment after WWI. As the country marches towards WWII, lives are changed when two of the daughters disappear.  The book has been critically acclaimed by many including Kirkus Reviews.

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The event with Ms. Hoover is free and open to the public. However, reservations are recommended as space is limited.  Call 802-649-1114 or email info@norwichbookstore.com to save your seat.

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1.What three books have helped shape you into the author you are today, and why?

Virginia Woolf’s To the Lighthouse taught me that both the shape of the sentence and its ideas matter, that these things are not in opposition but feed on each other. Kent Haruf’s novels, in particular Plainsong, gave me the courage to be plain spoken in my fiction, which I believe is my instinct in the first place. Toni Morrison’s Beloved proved that point of view and structure could always be fluid, and that the author has complete freedom in these choices, as long as the author carries the reader well enough along on that ride.url-1.jpgurl.jpg

2.What author (living or dead) would you most like to have a cup of coffee with and why?

I’m currently fascinated with Kate Atkinson. I would love to talk with her about her career, moving from her beloved, rather zany, experimental books to more genre type crime novels, and now her two historical novels, Life After Life and God of Ruins, both of which I consider two of my favorites. I would love to talk to Emily St. John Mandel too. Her novel Station Eleven was perfection. I’d like to talk to writers who I think are essentially normal people that have done great, unusual work. Otherwise I wouldn’t be able to talk at all.

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3. What books are currently on your bedside table?

I generally keep a pile of about ten or so, and the ones that catch me immediately are the ones I finish. I finished Jesmyn Ward’s Salvage the Bones a few weeks ago. A remarkable experience. And then there’s Charlie Quimby’s Monument Road, which I should have read years ago. Then there’s Margaret Atwood’s The Heart Goes Last, Jesse Ball’s A Cure for Suicide, and Susan Barker’s The Incarnations—all from last year’s top book lists. I have a copy of Julianna Baggott’s Harriot Wolf’s Seventh Book of Wonders, as well as two books by former students of mine: E.B. Moore’s Stones in the Road and Emily RossHalf in Love with Death. I know these last three well, but they’re still in that pile, keeping it warm.

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In plenty of time for Super Tuesday voting, this “3 Questions” features Ted Rall author of Bernie. Mr. Rall is a political cartoonist, opinion columnist, graphic novelist and occasional war correspondent whose work has appeared in hundreds of publications, including the New York Times, Washington Post, Village Voice, and Los Angeles Times. He twice won the Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award and has been a Pulitzer Prize finalist.
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Mr. Rall will be visiting the Norwich Bookstore at 7 pm on Friday, February 26 to discuss his latest book, Bernie, a graphic novel discussing the life of Vermont’s junior US Senator and Presidential candidate Bernie Sanders. (Please note his visit is not on the Bookstore’s typical Wednesday author event slot.)

The event with Mr. Rall is free and open to the public. However, reservations are recommended as space is limited.  Call 802-649-1114 or email info@norwichbookstore.com to save your seat.

1. What three books have helped shape you into the author you are today, and why?

Various compilations of the cartoons of Jules Feiffer, because he was the cartoonist who showed me the possibilities offered by verbose cartoons, and tackling politics through the people affected rather than the politicians. 1984 by George Orwell, because it was so completely committed to its (bleak) vision. The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich by William Shirer, because of its ambitiousness, trying to explain a phenomenon (Nazism) that remains impossible to process, even today.

2. What author (living or dead) would you like to have a cup of coffee with and why? 

Adolf Hitler, author of Mein Kampf. I want to know what the hell he was thinking, and why, and could he have been talked out of it.

3. What books are currently on your bedside table?

Days of Rage by Bryan Burrough, Congo by David van Reybrouck, Mussolini by Laura Fermi (out of print), The Embrace of Unreason by Frederick Brown.

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We begin our Autumn season with a post from our “3 questions” series. Since Cindy is both a funny, funny lady who tackles serious subjects and someone we are also lucky to call a friend, we are thrilled to begin our back from “gone reading” posts with her book recommendations. 

This “3 Questions” features Cindy Pierce, sex educator, college speaker, and author. She is on a mission to give students perspective and information to help navigate the cultural, media and peer pressures, particularly around their social lives and sexual relationships and equip parents to help them do so. Cindy hopes to help make those “difficult” sex ed conversations a little less difficult.

Ms. Pierce will be visiting the Norwich Bookstore at 7 pm on Friday, September 25th to discuss her latest book, Sexploitation: Helping Kids Develop Healthy Sexuality in a Porn-Driven World. This event is free and open to the public. However, reservations are recommended as space is limited.  Call 802-649-1114 or email info@norwichbookstore.com to save your seat.

1. What three books have helped shape you into the author you are today, and why?

  • For Goodness Sex by Al Vernaccio (2014) – His approach to sexuality education aligns with my own, and I learn so much from him. I recommend his book and TED talks to everyone who works with or has kids. I was so honored when he agreed to write the foreword to Sexploitation.
  • Daring Greatly by Brené Brown (2014) – I have grown up being encouraged to put myself out there, roll with the inevitable stumbles, and find meaning (and humor) in all of it. When I read Daring Greatly, the title and stories in my latest solo show, Comfort in the Stumble fell into place. Righteous imperfectionism has been the theme and underlying message in my life and through all aspects of my work. A big part of the message in my book is that parenting and talking to kids about sex requires emotional courage and acceptance of setbacks and stumbles.
  • How To Be a Woman by Caitlin Moran (2011) – Caitlin Moran is a feminist with an outrageous sense of humor. I admire her balance of being fierce, strong and bold, while also being honest and vulnerable in a healthy way. Being able to laugh at myself helps me find my way through life. When people read or hear my stories, they feel so much better about themselves; keeping the bar low is a bit of a public service I provide.

2. What author (living or dead) would you most like to have a cup of tea with and why?

I would love to have tea with Wayne Dyer, author of The Power of Intention. He is one of the most influential spiritual guides in my life and will continue to be despite his recent passing. I have read The Power of Intention  several times and reread my highlighted sections of the book regularly. His message has been a major influence on how I approach each day with positive intention and gratitude. Over tea, I would like to hear more stories and examples of how the power of intention has manifested for him and others.

3. What books are currently on your bedside table?

NOTE: “3 Questions” is part of our mission to promote authors, the joy of reading, and to help independent booksellers.  The Book Jam has paired with the The Norwich Bookstore in Norwich, Vermont to present this ongoing series. In it, we pose three questions to authors with upcoming visits to the bookstore. (We have a rotating list of six possible questions to ask just to keep things interesting.) Their responses are posted on The Book Jam during the days leading up to their engagement. Our hope is that this exchange will offer insight into their work, will encourage readers to attend these special author events, and ultimately, will inspire some great reading.

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As part of our mission to promote authors, the joy of reading, and to help independent booksellers, The Book Jam has paired with the The Norwich Bookstore in Norwich, Vermont to present an ongoing series entitled “3 Questions”. In it, we pose three questions to authors with upcoming visits to the bookstore. (We have a rotating list of six possible questions to ask just to keep things interesting.) Their responses are posted on The Book Jam during the days leading up to their engagement. Our hope is that this exchange will offer insight into their work, will encourage readers to attend these special author events, and ultimately, will inspire some great reading.

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This “3 questions” features Vicki Hoefle, a professional parent educator with over 20 years experience teaching parents, educators and caregivers how to raise respectful, responsible and resilient children. Ms. Hoefle combines her expertise in Adlerian Psychology and as an International Coaching Federation certified coach to bring parents Duct Tape Parenting, a book, but also a parenting strategy that provides time-tested tools for a happy and peaceful family life. Ms. Hoefle is a mother of six and lives in Middlebury, Vermont

Ms. Hoefle will be visiting the Norwich Bookstore at 7 pm on Wednesday, June 10 to discuss The Straight Talk on Parenting: A No-Nonsense Approach on How to Grow a Grown-UpThis is a ticketed event with proceeds going to The Family Place in Norwich, Vermont. Tickets are $5.00 and include admission plus 10% off Hoefle’s book. Please stop by the Norwich Bookstore or The Family Place to purchase a ticket (cash or check only, please) and reserve a seat. Questions? Call 802-649-1114.  And if you can not attend in person, you can benefit from Ms. Hoefle’s expertise through reading her latest book.

1). What three books have helped shape you into the author you are today, and why?

I am interested in providing readers with information they can use to challenge old beliefs, consider new perspectives, and reframe ideas which lead to changes in behavior and attitudes. These authors do this for me and inspire me to attempt to provide this for others.

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2). What author (living or dead) would you most like to have a cup of coffee with and why?

Anna Quindlen  – This is very personal and I’m not sure I can describe why I would want to share a cup of coffee with her.  I admire her as a writer, mother, woman, and friend.  There is something so brave and true and honest about the way she writes.  I don’t have a list of questions I would ask her but rather, I think I would learn just by being in her company and watching the way she views the world and interacts with others.

3) What books are currently on your bedside table?

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As part of our mission to promote authors, the joy of reading, and to help independent booksellers, The Book Jam has paired with the The Norwich Bookstore in Norwich, Vermont to present an ongoing series entitled “3 Questions”. In it, we pose three questions to authors with upcoming visits to the bookstore. (We have a rotating list of six possible questions to ask just to keep things interesting.) Their responses are posted on The Book Jam during the days leading up to their engagement. Our hope is that this exchange will offer insight into their work, will encourage readers to attend these special author events, and ultimately, will inspire some great reading.
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This “3 questions” features Nina MacLaughlin and her book Hammer Head: The Making of a Carpenter. In this book, she discusses the process of applying for a job as a carpenter, despite her only qualification being she was a classics major, and the learning that took place as a result of this major shift in her life.  The history of tools, the virtues of wood varieties, and the wisdom of Ovid are interwoven into this moving story of a person finding her passion. Nina MacLaughlin grew up in Massachusetts. She earned a B.A. in English and Classical Studies from the University of Pennsylvania, and worked for about eight years at the Boston Phoenix, the award-winning alternative newsweekly. In 2008, she quit her journalism job to work as a carpenter’s assistant. Her essays and reviews have appeared in the Los Angeles Review of Books, the Believer, the Boston Globe, the Rumpus, the Millions, Bookslut, and many other places. She lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts.
Ms. MacLaughlin will be visiting the Norwich Bookstore at 7 pm on Wednesday, May 20th to discuss Hammer Head: The Making of a Carpenter. This event is free and open to the public. However, reservations are recommended as space is limited.  Call 802-649-1114 or emailinfo@norwichbookstore.com to save your seat.
1. What three books have helped shape you into the author you are today, and why?
Peter Matthiessen’s The Snow Leopard, for the quest, for the adventure, for being open to mystery. Mattheissen is someone who was searching, and his boundless curiosity is something that I admire in the most major way. Anne Carson’s Plainwater, for its layers, for its non-categorizability (poems, essays, fragments), for its passion, for the author’s evident love of language, for its wrestling with pain and love and place and words. She pushes boundaries — of form, of language — that I wish I were able to push. And, cheating a little here: Loren Eiseley’s The Unexpected Universe and Annie Dillard’s Pilgrim at Tinker Creek. For their close attention to the natural world, for their lyricism, for the authors’ curiosity, for their awe and their infectious enthralledness of existing on this strange planet.

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2. What author would you most like to have a cup of coffee with and why?

Anne Carson is a writer, poet, essayist, translator, classics scholar, professor. She writes like no one writes and has a peculiar brain and it seems like she is someone who is in love with words. I would love to sit and talk with her. The thought of having a coffee with her is amazing. And also terrifying. I suspect I’d be a dry-mouthed tongue-tied imbecile in her presence and would probably spill my coffee all over her for nerves.

3. What was the last book that kept you up all night reading?

The physical nature of the carpentry work usually means that I’m asleep after a few pages, regardless of a book’s hold on me. But the most memorable reading experience for me in the last few years was Volume 1 of Karl Ove Knausgaard’s My Struggle series. I started it and could not stop and the whole of a weekend was taken up with this book. The rare best place that books can take you is that you inhabit another person’s life; such was the case with this book for me. I’m relieved I read him before the fame and attention surrounded his work as I think that might’ve corrupted the experience. The subsequent volumes have not had the same impact, but this initial one knocked my goddamn socks off. I’ll also mention Maggie Nelson’s Bluets. Though it didn’t keep me awake, it is the only book that I have read the last page of and immediately started again on page one (which has happened three times now — each time I read this book, I read it twice).

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