Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘A hologram for the King’

While here at the Book Jam we don’t necessarily subscribe to the notion that some books are good for women to read and others for men — we do believe it is important to distinctly honor Fathers on their special day with the perfect literary pick.  So in honor of the upcoming Father’s Day, we have selected some books for you to bestow upon the great dads out there.  And relax, you still have time to order them from your favorite independent bookseller.  Or, you can always make a creative “IOU a book, Dad” card.

Cartoon_dad : cute businessman over green background, fathers day. vector Stock Photo

 More Baths Less Talking by Nick Hornsby (2012) – Each month in Believer Magazine, Mr. Hornsby chronicles books he has purchased and those he has actually read or lost in the stack on his nightstand/desk during the previous month.   Periodically, someone collects them into a book.  In this latest volume, he is insightful and irreverent (as expected from the author of High Fidelity and other wry novels).  In one essay, he subtly pokes fun at the “businessmen” who sit next to him on airplanes and tell him – a novelist – that they “don’t read fiction” because they “want to learn something they don’t already know”.  But, by the end of the column, he confesses he wants to be one of these guys (and he describes them as “guys”) based solely on the power of his reading and loving The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks.  The bonus from reading this collection — a great reading list for anyone. ~ Lisa Christie

9780307947512A Hologram for the King by Dave Eggers (2012). I’ve thought long and hard about how to describe this book. It’s not uplifting. It’s not necessarily romantic. It’s certainly not a book I’d say has a happy ending, But it is relevant, insightful, and a parable for our times.  Selected as a finalist for the National Book Award and as one of the Top Ten Books of the Year by the New York Times, this novel is reminiscent of “A Visit from the Goon Squad” and other piercing contemporary fiction. Alan Clay, a middle-aged salesman finds himself trying to close a deal in a yet-to-be-constructed city on the edge of the desert in Saudi Arabia. It’s his last chance at business success and he’s in charge of team of green, young workers – all products of the new economy –  there to put on a holographic presentation for the king. This is a story that at its heart questions meaning in the modern marketplace as well as family and what it means to be a father. One of the most poignant parts of this story is a letter that the main character is writing his college aged daughter as he passes the time in this foreign land, a letter that attempts to explain his parenting decisions to her — and to himself. ~Lisa Cadow (seconded by Lisa Christie as a great book, that you remember long after you finish it.)

Ten Things I’ve Learnt About Love by Sarah Butler (July 2013) – Honestly, I picked this up because its title reminded me of one of my favorite of the  “stupid high school” movies genre – Ten Things I Hate About You (1999 with Heather Ledger and Julia Stiles).  While this book (unlike that movie) is not a riff on Shakespeare, it does offer a love letter to Shakespeare’s stomping ground  – London.  It also shows being a father from two perspectives.  The first view — that of a 29-year-old woman who has just lost her father to cancer.  The second perspective — a “hobo” of 50+ years who spends his days wandering London looking for the daughter he helped conceive but, through only a small fault of his own, has never met.  This debut novel offers a strong new author, and a contemporary look at what it means to be a father and to love. ~ Lisa Christie

Older, but Still good

Manhood for Amateurs by Michael Chabon (2010) — One of my favorite collections of essays ever.  Reading this will make you appreciate dads.  It will also make you appreciate Mr. Chabon’s writing. And, it may make you laugh and cry a bit. ~ Lisa Christie

Read Full Post »