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Posts Tagged ‘Archer Mayor’

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Ahhhh, November 9th. No matter what your political persuasion, we are certain we will all be grateful to wake up November 9th freed from political ads. We are also assuming most of you have already decided who has earned your vote, and you are ready to ignore the hype until election day.

So, to help distract us all as these final days of campaigning wind down, we review a few mysteries. Why mysteries? Perhaps because we are thinking of ghosts and thrillers on Halloween. Perhaps because even though we are trying to ignore the election hype, we know, due to the daily news, that we can’t fully engage in difficult prose right now. Perhaps we are just in the mood for a good thriller.

And, because surviving until election day is way too important to leave to the two of us, we asked for help with this post from our favorite booksellers – the Norwich Bookstore staff. Many of them were able to help, and we are very grateful for their reviews.

Happy Halloween and thank you all for voting – Lisa and Lisa

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The Case of the Missing Books Cover ImageThe Case of the Missing Books, a Mobile Library Mystery by Ian Sansom (2007) – A cast of eccentric characters populates this series of books set in Tumdrum, Ireland. Israel Armstrong is an outsider about to embark on an exciting new career—driving a mobile library. Fans of Waking Ned Devine and Doc Martin will wonder how they’ve lived this long without reading these quirky mysteries. ~ Beth Reynolds, Norwich Bookstore and Norwich Public Library

The Wild Inside: A Novel of Suspense Cover ImageWild Inside by Christine Carbo (2015) – This dramatic crime novel is spent in Montana’s majestic Glacier National Park. When he was 14, Ted Systead’s dad was dragged screaming from a campsite by a grizzly. Now Systead’s a special agent for the Department of the Interior investigating the death of a man who was tied up BEFORE he was mauled by a bear. Ms. Carbo has a good sense of the wildness of human nature AND the wilderness that surrounds us. ~ Carin Pratt, Norwich Bookstore

The Trespasser Cover ImageThe Trespasser by Tana French (2016) Yes, it’s long, but Tana French’s new Dublin Murder Squad mystery is so well written it doesn’t drag. Paranoid detective Antoinette Conway has to find out why a young woman was conked on the head next to a table set for a romantic dinner.  At the same time, she is fighting a lot of her colleagues in the department who seem hellbent on driving her out of the force. French is the master of the police interrogation room, and her mysteries are always about much more than the case at hand.  ~ Carin Pratt, Norwich Bookstore

The Girl from Venice Cover ImageThe Girl From Venice by Martin Cruz Smith (2016) – One night towards the end of WWII a fisherman fishing in the lagoon off Venice comes across the body of a lovely young woman.The woman turns out to be not at all dead, and what follows is a romp through the environs of Venice and the world of partisans, Fascists, the SS and even Mussolini. With a love story tossed in, everything comes together for a delightful read. ~ Penny McConnel, Norwich Bookstore

The Nature of the Beast: A Chief Inspector Gamache Novel Cover ImageLouise Penny’s Inspector Gamache Audio Books (assorted years) – If you love the Louise Penny series and have a hard time waiting for each new instalment of Inspector Gamache, try revisiting the earlier books in the series through an audiobook experience. For me, narrator Ralph Cosham so embodies the true voice of M. Gamache and the villagers of Three Pines that when he passed away before the instalment of the 11th book in the series, I felt as though a part of Gamache had died with him. ~ Katie Kitchel, Norwich Bookstore

I Let You Go Cover ImageI Let You Go by Clare Mackintosh (2016) – For me, this was the thriller of summer 2016. Written by a retired UK police woman, this is better than than the books it gets compared to – Gone Girl and The Girl on the Train. I Let You Go follows Jenna Gray as she moves to a remote cottage on the Welsh coast, trying to escape the memory of a car accident and desperate to heal from the loss of her child and other aspects of her past. The novel also watches a pair of Bristol police investigators trying to get to the bottom of a hit-and-run. You will like the characters, you will feel each plot twist, and you will lose a day of productivity (or a night of election news) as you finish this novel. Have fun! ~ Lisa Christie

The Woman in Cabin 10 Cover ImageThe Woman in Cabin 10 by Ruth Ware (2016) – This fast-paced mystery is sure to keep readers sweating through the cold, gray days of autumn – and beyond. The suspense begins immediately when we meet Lo Blacklock , a twenty-something travel writer, who is burgled in her London apartment as she prepares for her departure on an all expenses paid cruise through the Norwegian Fjords. She is hurtled into a constant state of uncertainty and anxiety that she has to manage as she hob nobs with the fancy passengers and press corps on the maiden voyage of the “Aurora”. When Lo believes that she witnesses a murder in the cabin next to hers, the question isn’t “Who dun it?”, but instead “Did it really happen?” The Woman in Cabin 10 is the latest in a series of page-turners that feature imperfect, unreliable yet somehow winsome protagonists. A page-turner that will keep you “cruising” (apologies for the pun) and wanting to finish the tale all in one read. If you still crave more at the end, don’t miss In a Dark, Dark Wood, Ruth Ware’s first bestseller that was published in 2015. ~Lisa Cadow

Nutshell Cover ImageNutshell by Ian McKewan (2016) – Though I must insert the caveat that I haven’t quite finished this slim volume, I can confidently assert that this mystery is treasure. Told from the completely original perspective of a 9-month-old fetus awaiting his birth, we witness his mother, Trudy, and her lover, Claude, plotting the murder of his father. A modern day interpretation of Hamlet, Nutshell is at once tragic and immensely amusing — with the baby boy simultaneously evaluating his mother’s wine choices while expressing his powerlessness to help his unsuspecting father. Told by a master writer at the height of his story-telling abilities, this is not to be missed.  ~Lisa Cadow (And, this review is COMPLETELY SECONDED by Lisa Christie who has finished this slim novel)

Presumption of Guilt Cover ImagePresumption of Guilt by Archer Mayor (2016) – Archer Mayor has brought back the memorable “Tag Man” along with his daughter for this fast-paced mystery. A body is found in cement that was poured over 40 years ago, and Gunther and his team need to reconstruct the actions and activities of several individuals over the span of time to figure out ‘who done it!’ I devoured it in a day… ~ Liza Bernard, Norwich Bookstore

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In a bit of a twist, today’s 3 questions focuses on a group, Sisters in Crime, coming to the Norwich Bookstore this coming Saturday, April 16th at 2 pm. The answers were provided by Beth Kanell, a member of the group and one of the event organizers.

During the Sisters in Crime event, a group of writers will gather to expose their own mystery work to readers and to get their creative juices flowing. Each participant, both published and not yet published, will have five minutes to read a selection of their own mystery writing to the group. Participating published writers include Toby Speed, Kate George, Beth Kanell, Brett Ann Stanciu, Deloris Netzband, Joseph Olshanand, Margot Zalkind Mayor (who will read from new work by her husband, Archer Mayor), Lisa Q. Matthews, and Vicki Steifel. You are invited to read from your work or to listen.

The Sisters in Crime New England group consists of authors, readers, publishers, agents, booksellers and librarians bound by a passion for the mystery genre and support of women who write mysteries. The group welcomes Sisters — and Misters — in Crime from anywhere who have an interest in the New England mystery community. To learn more, see www.sincne.org.images.png

This event is free and open to the public. Call 802-649-1114 or email info@norwichbookstore.com with questions.
The Monogram Murders: The New Hercule Poirot Mystery Cover ImageBrush Back Cover Image

1) How do Sisters in Crime‘s Murder By the Minute meetings encourage and support mystery writers?

The old days of women mystery writers being nearly invisible are steadily changing — but there’s still a tilted ratio of women to men on the bookshelves, and encouragement means a lot. Reading your work at Murder by the Minute helps remind you of how good your writing is, and why you wanted to write that book, even though it’s taking longer than you hoped! The appreciation and support that writers find among the Sisters (and occasional Brothers) in Crime at this event can boost you through the toughest parts of writing, because you realize you have real people waiting to find out the criminal, the solution, and your (amateur or pro) sleuth’s discoveries about both the mystery and her- or himself.

Cloak of Darkness Cover ImageThe Big Sleep Cover Image

2) In your opinion, what is the biggest challenge/obstacle to writing a good mystery?

A mystery is satisfying when all the parts make sense, from the clues to the crime to the solution. But a mystery stays with the reader as a really good mystery when the characters claim your long-term attention. Mastering the art of memorable characters is the hidden secret to writing a really good mystery (but it helps if you totally understand the crime involved!).

Hush Hush: A Tess Monaghan Novel Cover ImageThrough the Evil Days Cover ImageThe Scent of Rain and Lightning Cover Image

3) Which three mystery writers would you say are must-reads for the burgeoning mystery writer?

Today’s cozy mysteries are rooted in Agatha Christie‘s puzzle mysteries; the hard-boiled ones emerged from Raymond Chandler; and the art of the espionage mystery was refined by Helen MacInnes. Those are the musts — but their mysteries can feel out of date! The modern classics now include the mysteries by Sara Paretsky, Nancy Pickard, Julia Spencer-Fleming, and Laura Lippman — all champions of Sisters in Crime.
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Panicked about the few remaining gifts you need to purchase?  Please don’t. We have some great last minute recommendations for you.  And the best part – sizes don’t matter.

Florence: the Paintings & Frescoes, 1250 to 1743 by Ross King and Anja Grebe (2015) – WOW, just WOW. This tome is perfect for the art lovers and/or Italy lovers on your gift lists. It is also great for the person who has everything and is difficult to find a perfect gift to give. This volume will provide hours of looking, knowledge, and beauty. You could also buy it for yourself and just flip a page every day for a year. You will emerge more loving art, Italy, and a bit more informed than when you started. ~ Lisa Cadow and Lisa Christie

Who is? Who Was? What Was? Series (assorted dates) – These slim volumes are perfectly perfect for all the young readers on your list. There are at least one hundred of these books on a variety of historical figures and places, so truly there is one for every interest. At $4.99 each, you can get two or three, tailored to your favorite young readers’ dreams, for the perfect gift. ~ Lisa Cadow and Lisa Christie

Mysteries from Louise PennyArcher Mayor, and Robert Galbraith (assorted dates) – You really can not go wrong with a good mystery. And the bonus with these series is if the recipient likes the first book you give them, you have a lot gift-giving options going forward. We look forward each year to the new books in the sagas of Armand Gamanche, who sleuths around Quebec, Joe Gunther, who stays close to Vermont to solve the crime, and Cormoran Strike, who wanders London (note -we did not like the 2nd Galbraith so much, so feel free to just skip from #1 to #3). We think the people on your gift list will like these as well. We also love that these work for young adults and adults alike. ~ Lisa Cadow and Lisa Christie

Loki’s Wolves: Blackwell Pages Book #1  by KL Armstrong and MA Marr (2013) – This was a great read aloud for my Percy Jackson loving sons who were looking for a good new book to share. And, we are having a blast working our way through the other books in this series. ~ Lisa Christie

 

 

 

Mark Bittman’s Cookbooks (assorted years) – Yup, we recommend any Bittman cook book. Our copies of How to Cook Everything is falling apart from overuse. We have successfully given How to Cook Everything Vegetarian to many. And, we are looking forward to using his latest —Mark Bittman’s Kitchen Matrix — soon.  Basically, you can not go wrong by giving a cookbook by Mark Bittman. ~ Lisa Cadow and Lisa Christie

And our last pick comes with a caveat and some truly bad news, we hear that the publisher did not print enough of this next pick to meet holiday demand. So, our solution – Santa leaves a lovely IOU and you extend holiday cheer into 2016 when your special copy arrives. Or, place your order and save this gift idea for 2016 birthday gifts.

Harry Potter and the Sorceror’s Stone by JK Rowling and Jim Kay:  The Illustrated Version (2015) – This is an excellent books for kids who are new to Harry Potter, twenty-somethings who grew up reading Harry Potter, and well, the many adults who are closet HP fans. Ms. Rowling and Mr. Kay are going to produce an illustrated version of each of the books in Ms. Rowling’s Harry Potter series, one a year until all seven books have been done. This book is their first instalment. So, the good news, by starting with this book, you have your next six years of gifts covered as well. The bad news, just as when Harry Potter first rolled out, you have to wait seven years to complete the series. ~ Lisa Cadow and Lisa Christie

And of course, our other lists from Pages in the Pub and our 2015 Holiday Gift Guide can help you find additional perfect books for giving too.

 

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