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Both of the Lisa’s found their ways to wonderful memoirs over our “Gone Reading” hiatus. One is about hunger, the other about being hungry for Vermont. Happy reading and welcome autumn!

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FC9780062362599.jpgHunger by Roxane Gay (2017) – I don’t think I have ever read such a well-written, honest, and brutal account of sexual assault and its aftermath. This sounds like a horrific reason to pick up a book; and, it is horrid to think that the author endured a brutal and life-altering assault at age 12. Her analysis of her life after assault, as a morbidly obese woman in a society that abhors fat people, is brutal and punctuated with self-loathing. That said, her story and Ms. Gay’s candid insight offer much more than horror; this memoir is also filled with hope, self love, professional accomplishments, friendships, mistakes, social commentary, and always, always her body and her relationship with it. If you have ever tried to explain your relationship with your own body, Ms. Gay will help. If you have never understood this relationship, Ms. Gay will help. If you want to better understand how people who are obese often feel, Ms. Gay offers this gift to you. If you have a complicated relationship with your body, Ms. Gay shows you are not alone. If you just want to spend some time with a talented writer of insight, Ms. Gay’s Hunger is your chance. ~ Lisa Christie

FC9781681370743.jpgThe Farm In The Green Mountains by Alice Herndan-Zuckmayer (2017) –  As an immigrant to Vermont myself, I immediately fell in love with this sliver of a memoir. Written originally as a series of letters in the 1940’s to her husband’s parents back in Europe, Herdan-Zuckmayer chronicles the five years her family spent on “Backwoods Farm” in Barnard, Vermont. She and her husband,  both intellectuals in Germany,  were exiled by the Nazis to America due to their political views. This book was a best seller in Germany after World War II and a new edition has bee published this year by The New York Review of Books. Herdan-Zuckermayer’s writing style feels like a cheerful, warm embrace and her insights into American culture are poignant. I appreciated reading  about big snows, little general stores, shared telephone party lines, raising depressed ducks, and the family’s first American Christmas.  Not to be missed are her descriptions of Dartmouth’s Baker Library (and American libraries in general) and the many pilgrimages she made there during her time in America. Alice and her husband both felt they had found a true home in this remote corner of the world, and it truly comes across in this charming account of their life in the Green Mountains. ~ Lisa Cadow

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PS — Happy Anniversary to Lisa and Ken!

 

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