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Posts Tagged ‘Eleanor Catton’

As part of our mission to promote authors, the joy of reading, and to better understand the craft of writing, we’ve paired with the The Norwich Bookstore in Norwich, Vermont to present an ongoing series entitled “3 Questions”.  In it, we pose three questions to authors with upcoming visits to the bookstore.  Their responses are posted on The Book Jam during the days leading up to their engagement.  Our hope is that this exchange will offer insight into their work and will encourage readers to attend these special author events and read their books.

This post we feature Tracey Campbell Pearson, author of Elephant’s Story and other picture books such as Bob and Myrtle. Ms. Pearson studied at Syracuse University and the Parsons School of Design in NYC. She has lived in Cleveland, New York City and Connecticut, among other places, but now makes her home in Vermont.

Ms. Pearson will appear at the Norwich Public Library between 1 and 3 pm on Saturday, February 8th as part of a Second Saturdays, a new collaboration between the library and the Norwich Bookstore to highlight great books for children.  Saturday’s event will offer fun Valentine’s Day related art projects and an introduction to her latest book Elephant’s Story. 

Reservations are not needed this time.  Just stop by to meet Ms. Pearson and make some Valentines crafts.  Call 802-649-1114 or email info@norwichbookstore.com with any questions or to reserve your book.  AGAIN – this event is at the LIBRARY.

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1.What three books have helped shape you into the author you are today, and why?

1.  The Beast and Monsieur Racine by Tomi Ungerer. This is the book that made me want to make picture books. Tomi pushes the envelope with his humor while leaving us with the kind and gentle Monsieur Racine. A perfect balance of salty and sweet. I was introduced to Tomi’s work while I was studying with Maurice Sendak in NYC in the ’70’s.
2.  Fish for Supper by MB Goffstein takes the picture book down to it’s simplest form but can still be read again and again. A lovely book.
3.  Any collection of *Mother Goose poems. I have many.  I Saw Esau by Iona and Peter Opie with Maurice Sendak‘s illustrations is a favorite.  * I can go on forever about how children need their Mother Goose!!

2.What author (living or dead) would you most like to have a cup of coffee with and why?

Mr. Edward Lear.  Why?  Well…He answers the question himself below…

How pleasant to know Mr. Lear

How pleasant to know Mr. Lear,
Who has written such volumes of stuff.
Some think him ill-tempered and queer,
But a few find him pleasant enough.

His mind is concrete and fastidious,
His nose is remarkably big;
His visage is more or less hideous,
His beard it resembles a wig.

He has ears, and two eyes, and ten fingers,
(Leastways if you reckon two thumbs);
He used to be one of the singers,
But now he is one of the dumbs.

He sits in a beautiful parlour,
With hundreds of books on the wall;
He drinks a great deal of marsala,
But never gets tipsy at all.

He has many friends, laymen and clerical,
Old Foss is the name of his cat;
His body is perfectly spherical,
He weareth a runcible hat.

When he walks in waterproof white,
The children run after him so!
Calling out, “He’s gone out in his night-
Gown, that crazy old Englishman, oh!”

He weeps by the side of the ocean,
He weeps on the top of the hill;
He purchases pancakes and lotion,
And chocolate shrimps from the mill.

He reads, but he does not speak, Spanish,
He cannot abide ginger beer;
Ere the days of his pilgrimage vanish,
How pleasant to know Mr. Lear!

3. What books are currently on your bedside table?
I have book “piles” on my bedside table. I just started The Luminaries by Eleanor Catton. It’s delicious.   It’s a big book to travel with so on my most recent trip I packed a Donna Leon mystery and Alice Munro’s short stories.
You didn’t ask about the books “under my bed”. This is where I keep a pile of heavy art books.  No room on the “bedside table” but plenty of room on the “bedside floor”.  My sister just sent me a Sendak book for my birthday. It is lovely.

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As part of our mission to promote authors, the joy of reading, and to better understand the craft of writing, we’ve paired with the The Norwich Bookstore in Norwich, Vermont to present an ongoing series entitled “Three Questions”.  In it, we pose three questions to authors with upcoming visits to the bookstore. Their responses are posted on The Book Jam in the week leading up to their engagement. Our hope is that this exchange will offer insight into their work and will encourage readers to attend these special author events.

We are thrilled to welcome Scottish-born writer Margot Livesey to the Book Jam. She is the best selling author of six books, including Eva Moves the FurnitureThe House on Fortune Street and her newest, a “retelling” of Jane Eyre,  The Flight of Gemma Hardy (2012) which is set between Scotland and Iceland in the 1960’s.  Ms. Livesey is also the current Fiction Editor at Ploughshares, a renowned literary journal, and her work has appeared in The New Yorker and The Atlantic Monthly. She has taught writing at many institutions such as Bowdoin College, Brandeis University, WIlliams College, Tufts University, and The Iowa Writer’s Workshop. For more information about her reading on Wednesday, March 14th or to reserve a seat, please contact The Norwich Bookstore at (802) 649-1114. This promises to be a very special event.

1) What three books have shaped you into the author you are today, and why?

The terrible novel I wrote while travelling round Europe and North Africa at the age of twenty-one, because it made me realise that I’d entirely failed to be influenced by all the wonderful novels I’d read.  Jane Eyre because it is such a wonderful example of a passionate first person narrator and it made me think about how to create a heroine rather than a woman character.  It’s also a fabulous example of the importance of setting in a novel.

2.What author (living or dead) would you most like to have a cup of coffee with and why?

George Eliot.  In its scope, ambition and accomplishment Middlemarch is one of the great novels.  I don’t think Eliot would be a particularly easy person to have coffee with – I can imagine awkward silences and then rather long rants – but I do think she’d have something interesting to say about almost everything.

3.What books are currently on your bedside table?

Scott Fitzgerald’s Tender is the Night, Alan Shapiro’s wonderful debut novel Broadway Baby, Eleanor Henderson’s Ten Thousand Saints – another debut novel that recreates the 80s with amazing vividness, and Eleanor Catton’s The Rehearsal which is set in an all girls school and is so beautifully and intelligently written.

From Lisa Christie: While we often do not have the chance to read the latest work by an author before their visits to the Norwich Bookstore, I was able to read Ms. Livesey’s The Flight of Gemma Hardy in time for this “Three Questions” post.  Set in Scotland and then Iceland in the 1960s, this book provides an homage to Jane Eyre, while still remaining its own novel.  As a huge fan of both Scotland and Iceland, I truly enjoyed the sense of place she created — I could feel the wind of the moors and the sea and … Basically, this novel is a just a fun read – think of it as a beach read for March, and I think fans of Jane Eyre will be especially intrigued, or maybe annoyed or… So please join the two Lisas of The Book Jam in Norwich on Wednesday, March 14th at 7 pm for Ms. Livesey’s reading and discussion at the Norwich Bookstore.  But, call 802-649-1114 soon to reserve your seat because, as always, seating is limited.

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