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Posts Tagged ‘Ellen Gilchrist’

As part of our mission to promote authors, the joy of reading, and to help independent booksellers, The Book Jam has paired with the The Norwich Bookstore in Norwich, Vermont to present an ongoing series entitled “3 Questions”. In it, we pose three questions to authors with upcoming visits to the bookstore. (We have a rotating list of six possible questions to ask just to keep things interesting.) Their responses are posted on The Book Jam during the week leading up to their engagement. Our hope is that this exchange will offer insight into their work, will encourage readers to attend these special author events, and ultimately, will inspire some great reading.
This “3 questions” features Ellen Stimson, whose family’s escapades about moving to Vermont were featured in Mud Season. In her latest book – Good Grief! Life in a Tiny Vermont Villageshe chronicles what happens next. She explores what happens after you live your dream for awhile? And perhaps most importantly, what happens when your children become teenagers?
 
She will be visiting the Norwich Bookstore at 7 pm on Wednesday, November 19th to discuss Good Grief! Life in a Tiny Vermont Village. This event is free and open to the public. However, reservations are recommended as space is limited.  Just call 802-649-1114 or email info@norwichbookstore.com to save your seat.

1. What three books have helped shape you into the author you are today, and why?
  • The Anna Papers and every single other word Ellen Gilchrist has ever written. (Please note The Anna Papers is out of print, but the Norwich Bookstore can help you find a copy.) She shows us that you can explore all of the big questions in life really within one small geography and one rambling family system. Her characters come back and teach us about growing up and love and aging, and they face all of the big questions in their normal lives just like the rest of us do.
  • Angle of Repose by Wallace Stegner. There is this great passage where the narrator, a paraplegic man, is researching his grandmother’s life through her papers. She had a big juicy life, but he has just come upon some tragedy she faced, her house burning down or something, and he wonders about the Doppler Effect on our lives. He imagined how it all must have sounded to her in the moment, bearing down on her like a freight train, as opposed to how it sounded to him years later when he knew about all the joys that had followed and the sounds of the tragedy had receded into the distance. It was a lesson about taking the long view that I try to remember almost every day.
  • Texasville by Larry McMurtry. Mr McMurtry knows that humor is the grease and he doesn’t skimp on it either.
2. What author (living or dead) would you most like to have a cup of coffee with and why?
Maybe Pat Conroy. I love those big fat characters of his, and those long gorgeous blowsy descriptions of the South. I really want that man to cook for me. God, I bet he can cook like a dream.
3. What books are currently on your bedside table?

I am reading Sarah Waters’ ​The Paying Guests (delicious), Ann Hood’s An Italian Wife ( I met her recently at a joint reading. Now, she’s a real writer.), and the new David Ignatius – The Director. (He has a bit in here where the Baghdad CIA station chief writes a list of rules for when you are under fire. Number one is – “Always have a plan for when something bad happens”. And number two is – “always move first”. If you want until the situation is clear it may be too late. I think these apply to book writing pretty handily.)

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