Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Ernest Hemingway’

s montgomery & et narshall

This week we feature two authors – Elizabeth Marshall Thomas and Sy Montgomery – who are slated for an amazing evening exploring the natural world and discussing their new book Tamed and Untamed:Close Encounters of the Animal KindThis event will take place at the Norwich Bookstore at 7 pm on Wednesday, October 25.  NOTE: This event is free and open to the public. However, reservations are recommended as space is limited (rumor has it they are already compiling a waiting list). Please call 802-649-1114 or email info@norwichbookstore.com to save a seat and/or secure your autographed copy of Tamed and Untamed (a great holiday gift for those of you already shopping).

FC9781603587556.jpg

While writing her books for adults and children, Sy Montgomery has been chased by an angry silverback gorilla in Rwanda, hunted by a tiger in India, and swum in the Amazon. One of her 21 books The Soul of an Octopus was a National Book Award finalist. Upper Valley residents can call her neighbor as she lives close by with her husband, the writer Howard Mansfield, and their animal menagerie.

Elizabeth Marshall Thomas has observed dogs, cats, elephants, and human animals during her half-century-long career and during her childhood in Africa. Her many books include Dreaming of Lions and The Hidden Life of Dogs. Like Ms. Montgomery, Ms. Thomas lives near the Upper Valley in New Hampshire.

 

In an experiment in formatting, we have mingled these co-authors’ individual responses to our three questions below.

FC9780141325293.jpgFC9780295962030.jpgFC9781501121968.jpg

1.What three books have helped shape you into the writer you are today, and why?

The three books that shaped me were (1) The Jungle Book by Rudyard Kipling  (hated the movie) (2) The Wolves of Mount McKinleyby Adolph Murie, and (3) The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway—the first two because they’re about animals and Hemingway because he changed the way people write. ~ Liz M Thomas

FC9780805073683.jpgThe Outermost House by Henry Beston. A quote from these pages helped me to define what I set out to do in chronicling the natural world. “We need another and a wiser and perhaps a more mystical concept of animals…..For the animal shall not be measured by man. In a world older and more complete than ours, they move finished and complete, gifted with extensions of the senses we have lost or never attained, living by voices we shall never hear. They are not brethren, they are not underlings; they are other nations, caught with ourselves in the net of life and time, fellow prisoners of the splendour and travail of the earth.” ~ Sy Montgomery

FC9780415267472.jpgKing Solomon’s Ring by Konrad Lorenz. I read this classic account of animal behavior as a young woman just out of college and was entranced not only by its scientific revelations but also by the respect and affection with which this imminent naturalist regarded each individual animal. ~ Sy Montgomery

FC9780395924969.jpgThe Edge of the Sea by Rachel Carson. This title introduced me to the work of an author who helped found the modern environmental movement. I bought this, her third book, as a discard at a library sale the first year I began work as a newspaper reporter. I wasn’t yet an environmental reporter, but I wanted to learn about seaweeds and snails. I became a devotee of Carson’s sharp eye and poetic voice and sought outher later works, including Silent Spring, her sweeping expose of the chemical poisoning of the natural world. ~ Sy Montgomery

download.jpgdownload-1.jpg

2.What author (living or dead) would you most like to have a cup of coffee with and why?

The author I’d like to have a cup of coffee with is Hemingway, because he changed the way people write. ~ Liz M Thomas

Konrad Lorenz, the Nobel-Prize winning naturalist widely credited for founding the science of ethology, the study of animal behavior, one of whose books I mentioned above. And it would have to be more than a cup of coffee. How about a whole pot? There is not one animal known to humankind whose behavior I would not want to discuss with him. And–could I bring Liz? ~ Sy Montgomery

FC9780271067209.jpgFC9781140603146.jpgFC9781328473059.jpgFC9781610918077.jpg

3.What books are currently on your bedside table?

The book currently on my bedside table is Among the Bone Eaters by Marcus Baynes-Rock, because Baynes-Rock is an anthropologist who studies not only a human population but also the other animals who live in conjunction with them—in this case, Ethiopians and hyenas.  It’s a fabulous book! ~ Liz M Thomas

I actually don’t have a bedside table; instead, right next to my side of the bed is a bookcase the length of the bedroom. But the books currently “in play” on my side at this moment are:

Read Full Post »

download.jpg

Ahhh travel … Honestly, when we are not doing it, we are dreaming about it. When we are not dreaming about it, we are reading as much as we can about far away places. So for today, we review some of our favorite books for inspiring future travel and/or for taking you away without leaving home.

download-2.jpg

Brazilian Adventure Cover ImageBrazilian Adventure by Peter Fleming (1933) – In 1932, Peter Fleming, brother of Ian Fleming (yes, the James Bond Fleming) traded in his editor job for an adventure  — taking part in a search for missing English explorer Colonel P.H. Fawcett. Colonel Fawcett was lost, along with his son and another companion, while searching Brazil for the Lost City of Z (a trip recently memorialized by a Hollywood movie). With meager supplies, faulty maps, and packs of rival newspapermen on their trail, Fleming and company hiked, canoed, and hacked through 3,000 miles of wilderness and alligator-ridden rivers in search of Fawcett’s fate. Mr. Fleming tells the tale with vivid descriptions and the famous British wry humor, creating a truly memorable memoir and possibly one of the best travel books of all time.

The River of Doubt: Theodore Roosevelt's Darkest Journey Cover ImageThe River of Doubt by Candice Millard (2006) – After his humiliating election defeat in 1912, President Theodore Roosevelt decided to take on the most punishing physical challenge he could find — the first descent of an unmapped tributary of the Amazon (River, not the retail behemoth). Like Fleming, in the previously reviewed book, Roosevelt’s cast of adventurers is ill-prepared for the hardships ahead. Almost immediately, they lose their canoes and supplies in the whitewater rapids. This loss is followed by starvation, Indian attacks, disease, drowning, and murder; Roosevelt was brought to the brink of suicide. This nonfiction tale held my then 10-year-old and 13 year-old boys and their father in rapt attention as our family read-aloud when we were privileged to explore the Amazon River portion of my youngest’s native Colombia.

A Moveable Feast Cover ImageMoveable Feast by Ernest Hemingway (1960) – We now move from South America to Europe with Mr. Hemingway’s classic memoir of his time in Paris. Read it to capture what Paris meant to American ex-pats in the 1920s. Or, read it just to enjoy fabulous writing and a glimpse into history. This book vividly renders the lives of Hemingway, his first wife Hadley, and their son Jack. It also includes irreverent portraits of their fellow travellers, such as F. Scott Fitzgerald and Ford Maddox Ford, as well as insight into Hemingway’s own early experiments with his writing.

Burial Rites Cover ImageBurial Rites by Hannah Kent (2013) – Based upon the true story of Agnes, the last woman executed in Iceland, Ms. Kent vividly renders Agnes’s life from the point where she is sent to an isolated farm to await execution for killing her former master (or did she?). While the people Agnes encounters are memorable, perhaps most memorable is the way Ms. Kent makes Iceland a character too. As with anything written by the incredible writer Halldor Laxness, Burial Rites is for anyone planning a trip to this spectacular country, wanting to go there in their imagination, or wanting to revisit a trip they took there long ago.

download-1.jpg

Read Full Post »

As part of our mission to promote authors, the joy of reading, and to help independent booksellers, The Book Jam has paired with the The Norwich Bookstore in Norwich, Vermont to present an ongoing series entitled “3 Questions”. In it, we pose three questions to authors with upcoming visits to the bookstore. (We have a rotating list of six possible questions to ask just to keep things interesting.) Their responses are posted on The Book Jam during the days leading up to their engagement. Our hope is that this exchange will offer insight into their work, will encourage readers to attend these special author events, and ultimately, will inspire some great reading.

Willy Loman's Reckless Daughter or Living Truthfully Under Imaginary Circumstances Cover ImageSolitary Bee Cover Image

This “3 Questions” features two poets Elizabeth Powell and Chelsea Woodard. These award winning poets have authored numerous volumes of poetry. Both authors will visit the Norwich Bookstore in Norwich, Vermont at 7 pm on Wednesday, October 26, 2016 to discuss poetry and their latest collections. The event is free and open to the public. However, reservations are recommended as space is limited.  Call 802-649-1114 or email info@norwichbookstore.com to save your seat.

eliz powell.jpg

Elizabeth Powell

Elizabeth A. I. Powell’s second book Willy Loman’s Reckless Daughter: Living Truthfully Under Imaginary Circumstances won the Robert Dana Prize in poetry. A Pushcart Prize winner, Ms. Powell has also received a Vermont Council on the Arts grants and a Yaddo fellowship. Her work has appeared in Alaska Quarterly Review, Barrow Street, Black Warrior Review, Ecotone, Harvard Review, Handsome, Hobart, Indiana Review, Missouri Review, Mississippi Review, Slope, Sugarhouse Review, Ploughshares, Post Road, and elsewhere. Born in New York City, she has lived in Vermont since 1989 with her four children.

A New Selected Poems Cover ImageNine Stories Cover ImageThe Nick Adams Stories Cover Image

1.What three books have helped shape you into the writer you are today, and why?

Galway Kinnell’s Selected Poems….my grandmother gave it to me and the musicality and lyricism  combined with the depth of meaning and metaphor totally blew my mind permanently as a 15 year old. Prior to reading that book, I had the usual suspects, and I had spent my young childhood listening to a record album called something like “The Wit of John F. Kennedy”, and I think listening endlessly and obsessively to that gave me a real sense of tuning in to speech patterns and cadences.

Also, I like what Charles Simic says about good lines of  poetry, that they are like good jokes in phrasing and timing. I grew up also listening to a lot of Groucho Marx and Richard Pryor. The Book of Lists was also important. I love list poems now.

But in terms of books, JD Salinger’s Nine Stories was and is important to my sensibility, how to come at the truth  from an angle.

As a young person I loved Ernest Hemingway’s The Nick Adams Stories. It showed me the perfect sentence. It taught me “that everything is 7/8 below the surface.”

search.jpg

2.What author (living or dead) would you most like to have a cup of coffee with and why?

Walt Whitman because he contains multitudes and I like that!

Fortune Smiles: Stories Cover ImageI Must Be Living Twice: New and Selected Poems Cover ImageJesus' Son Cover Image

3.What books are currently on your bedside table?

chelsea woodard - writer, editor, poet, critic and translator

Chelsea Woodard

Chelsea Woodard received her MFA from the Johns Hopkins University and her PhD from the University of North Texas. She earned a BA in Visual Arts and English from Union College. Her poems have appeared in The Threepenny Review, Southwest Review, Best New Poets, Blackbird, 32 Poems and other journals. She currently teaches in New Hampshire where she lives with her husband, Pete.

An Eco-Acoustic Reading of Seamus Heaney's Death of a Naturalist Cover ImageThe Canterbury Tales Cover ImageRonia, the Robber's Daughter Cover Image

1.What three books have helped shape you into the writer you are today, and why?

Seamus Heaney’s Death of a Naturalist has had a large influence on me. The fact that, while he is looking downward and backward in the poems, “digging” into the details of his personal and familial history, he is always looking beyond those things into new territory as well, trying to make whatever “darkness” he finds “echo” somehow. His echoing darkness, to me, is a very resonant image for poetry. Reading the Canterbury Tales in college and then re-reading them, as a graduate student, years later also had a big impact. I was astounded and still am by the music of the Tales, the grittiness of the detail, and the unexpected pathos. Chaucer’s rhyme royal is stunning. I felt, reading the Tales, that I was able to see such a vividly defined worldview through the pilgrims’ stories. I also love how Chaucer gives the female characters such agency, and always read him in the Tales as a sort of pioneer feminist. There are also numerous children’s books that have been formative. One in particular is a book by the Swedish author, Astrid Lindgren, called Ronia, the Robber’s Daughter. I still keep a copy on my bookshelf. Lindgren’s descriptions of the forest and its inhabitants have always stuck with me––the feeling that there are things lurking in the undergrowth both beautiful and terrifying, the sense of awe for the natural world that she expresses even in a story meant for children.
search-1.jpgsearch-2.jpg
2.What author (living or dead) would you most like to have a cup of coffee with and why?

Probably Anthony Hecht. From everything I’ve heard, he was incredibly wise and dignified, and I think his writing is imbued with such grace, intelligence, and gravitas. Also sadness. I would love to sit and talk with him about life, or history, or writing. He was one of the great greats. I wish I could have met him. Second would be Geoffrey Chaucer.

We Are as Gods: Back to the Land in the 1970s on the Quest for a New America Cover ImageThe Wynona Stone Poems Cover ImageThe Turnip Princess and Other Newly Discovered Fairy Tales Cover ImageThe Last Illusion Cover Image3.What books are currently on your bedside table?

A creative nonfiction book called We Are as Gods by Kate Daloz, about the back to the land movement in the 1970s. A friend recommended her book, and I went to her talk in Peterborough this summer––it’s a fascinating and vivid story. Caki Wilkinson’s most recent book, The Wynona Stone Poems, The Turnip Princess and Other Newly Discovered Fairy Tales (which I have not started but am looking forward to), Gene Weingarten’s collection, The Fiddler in the Subway, and The Last Illusion, by Porochista Khakpour.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »