Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Hunger Games’

Next month, Catching Fire – part two of the Hunger Games trilogy debuts in movie form; The Fault In Our Stars is being filmed and/or edited as we write this.  Divergent will be a movie before we know it.  These movie versions of books have us thinking about terrific young adult fiction.  And when we think, we tend to read.  So today we thought we would highlight some great young adult books that have not yet made it to the big screen.

The Beginning of Everything by Robyn Schneider (2013) – This novel offers a great way to think about fate and choices.  Plus, this has one of the most memorable opening chapter events of any book I have ever read.  If you continue past chapter one you will: 1) Get to know Ezra – the golden boy of his high school until a car accident ends his star tennis career.  2) Get to know Toby – a boy ostracized by his classmates ever since being the innocent victim of the horrific event in chapter one.  3) Meet Cassidy – the new girl in town with a huge secret that sets her apart.  4) Start to believe Ezra is right when he states that everyone has a tragedy waiting for them.  Yes, Ezra believes each life has a single encounter after which everything that really matters will happen In other words, an event that is “the beginning of everything”. ~ Lisa Christie

Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein (2012) – OK, I lost sleep reading this one; I could not put it down.  It has young women heroines, WWII history, a glimpse into life in England and France, spies, and Nazis.  Pick it up and be prepared to spend a day reading. Note: This review is short as it is hard to review this book without giving away too much plot; and, surprise is important with this book. ~ Lisa Christie

Rose Under Fire by Elizabeth Wein (September 2013) – I am not sure how the award winning author of Code Name Verity endured the research for this book.  She must have just kept thinking it was so much worse for the actual prisoners. But in this book, she takes on the German concentration camps, specifically Ravensbruck.  Ravensbruck is where her heroine Rose, an American ATA pilot, ends up after being overtaken by two German fighter planes.  What happens to her there is unthinkable; what she witnesses is worse.  But somehow, while this book caused me to cry quietly throughout, and then sustainably at the end, the message is one of hope, survival, and bearing witness so that the horrible, horrible things that happened in Ravensbruck, never occur again.  May all world leaders read this and govern accordingly.  But in the meantime, get this book in the hands of your favorite future world leader and yourself. (And yes, a few characters from Code Name Verity play a part, but mostly this is the tale of Rose and her fellow prisoners.) ~ Lisa Christie

Eleanor and Park by Rainbow Rowell (2013) – Set during one school year in 1986, this is the story of two star-crossed misfits — both from the “wrong side of the tracks” and smart enough to know that first love rarely, if ever, lasts, but willing to try anyway.  When you watch as Park meets Eleanor, you’ll remember your own high school years, riding the school bus, any time you tried to fit in while figuring out who you were, and your own first love.  I also truly believe that when the book ends you will think hard about children from the “other side of the tracks” and from family situations that are less than ideal. ~ Lisa Christie

Read Full Post »

Recently both of us have had the pleasure of finding a book that we just couldn’t put down, one that we carried everywhere in order to eek out a few extra minutes of reading between meetings or while waiting to pick up kids, one that kept us up late into the night.  Yes, we may have lost a few hours of sleep because the suspense was killing us, but burning the midnight oil and finishing it one fell swoop made it worth having to guzzle an extra cup of coffee to manage the next day.

This post is dedicated to the thrill of reading, to the suspense filled books we’ve just finished, and to an oldie but goodie in this page turning genre.

AND REMEMBER, TODAY, April 23, 2012, IS THE LAST DAY TO VOTE FOR THE BOOK JAM AT THE INDE BLOGGER AWARDS. Click here to cast your ballot. Thank you!

Afterwards by Rosamund Lupton (24 April, 2012) – We both thoroughly enjoyed her first novel Sister (2011).  Now for our individual reviews.

From Lisa Christie ~ I LOVED this one. I cried.  OK, I at least teared up and was sad for a while. Yes, I did.  And, even though I have an annoying habit of being able to guess the ending of television shows, movies and mystery novels, I still sighed at the end.  Why? Well, it is hard not to put yourself in the place of each of the characters in this novel; a novel about the aftermath of a school fire where a teenager is trapped and a mother goes in to save her.  The give and take of who will survive and who caused the commotion is well executed. The questions of what would you do for love resonate long after you finish.  I highly recommend this second book by the author of Sister – another great and well written and moving book for those of you in the mood for a modern “thriller”.

From Lisa Cadow: I, too, enjoyed Afterwards. The subject matter – about the days following a devastating school fire that leaves a mother and her teenage daughter in critical care – is certainly not “easy”  but the author pulls the reader in with her Lovely Bones style of writing (with an injured, out-of-body narrator telling the story). Meet Grace, the mother, who’s able to watch events unfold despite being in a coma. Though I wouldn’t normally be drawn to something so seemingly macabre, I loved Lupton’s first book, Sister, (about a woman who goes to London to search for her missing sister) and was eager for another one of her literary wild rides. She didn’t disappoint with this one as a result of the unusual and original way she’s constructed the story, the interesting psychology of the characters, and the everyday nature of the drama. The hardcover release date in the United States is tomorrow, April 24th, 2012. I suggest readers plan to sleep in on the morning of the 25th.

The Hunger Games Trilogy by Suzanne Collins (2008, 2009, 2010) – Even on re-reading in preparation for seeing The Hunger Games on the BIG screen, I found these are well-paced books for teens and beyond and I still ignored other things in order to finish.  Katniss Everdeen is a heroine you love to love and the premise is fascinating. ~Lisa Christie

Rebecca by Daphne Du Maurier (1938). This was the first book that kept me up practically all night reading. I simply couldn’t get enough of “Manderley,” Maxim de Winter’s estate in the British countryside, where he brings his new, young wife after a whirlwind courtship on the French Riviera. Once there, she is plagued by the ghost of the seemingly perfect “Rebecca” – Maxim’s late wife – whose presence still fills the halls, gardens, wardrobes, and picture galleries. This psychological thriller has the reader questioning her own reality and sanity as she flips through the pages watching the new Mrs. de Winter deal with the venomous housekeeper, Mrs. Danvers, and planning a ball for Maxim de Winter’s friends. This great book will keep readers of all ages on the edge of their seats and up throughout the night.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

You’re Invited:

And one last item.  For those of you in the Norwich, Vermont area, please join us for our first Pages in the Pub on April 30th.  Pages in the Pub brings the Book Jam “live” to a local inn, so that other book lovers may talk about books with some “experts” — local booksellers and local librarians — over a glass of wine, beer or seltzer.  (It would be an ideal way for your book club to get ideas for your next few months’ worth of selections, in addition to books for your own reading stack.)  Proceeds from the event benefit the local public library.  To attend the April 30th at the Norwich Inn, event call the Norwich Bookstore – 802-649-1114 to reserve your spot with a $5 contribution.  All proceeds for this first event will be donated to the Norwich Public Library.

Read Full Post »