Posts Tagged ‘JoJo Moyes’

Once again, it is time for our annual list of great books to dig into after the relatives have left ( or, after the holidays end). This year, we seem to have selected some amazing tales that all have powerful women at their center (maybe we are channeling the women’s marches of a year ago). However, no matter their commonalities, each of these books will provide excellent reading to start your new year. Happy 2018!


FC9781631494758.jpgWomen and Power: A Manifesto by Mary Beard (2017) – Stop everything you’re doing, find a copy this beautiful little black book and start reading. Next, immediately buy ten copies and share them with your daughters sisters, and mother. And then, read it again. And then, share it with the men in your life (e.g., sons, husband, partner, co-workers, neighbors). Mary Beard’s newest work, sure to be a classic (no pun intended), is based on two of her lectures and draws upon her deep knowledge of the classics (she is a professor at Cambridge University and is the author of bestselling SPQR).  Beard examines how the the stories of mythical Greco-Roman characters like Penelope, Medusa, and Clytemnestra have informed women’s contemporary perceptions of how women are allowed to use our voices in public and to navigate the centers of power. A perfect pairing with Chimamanda Adichie’s We Should All Be Feminists and a powerful resource to help guide women in the #metoo era. ~Lisa Cadow and Lisa Christie

FC9780399575068.jpgHum If You Don’t Know the Words by Bianca Marias (2016) – An intimate look at life in South Africa during Apartheid.  This tale is told through the eyes of Robin, a young white girl who loses her mother and father during during the 1976 student uprising in Soweto. By using the narrator’s innocence to drive a plot of how she and Beauty, a middle-aged Black teacher who also experiences heart-wrenching loss during the uprising, are flung together, Ms. Marias exposes so much about how living through hate and fear causes unending harm. A great book for those with an interest in South Africa, human rights, racism, atypical families, and/or coming-of-age stories. ~Lisa Christie

FC9780735224292.jpgLittle Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng (2017) – A page turning tale of a suburb turned inside out when a mother-daughter duo rolls into town.  With her latest novel, Ms. Ng tackles race, adoption, planned communities (based on her own experiences growing up in Shaker Heights, Ohio), teenagers, middle-aged dreams, and art, all in a well-written tale of family and love. ~Lisa Christie

FC9780062654199.jpgThe Alice Network by Kate Quinn  (2017) – This suspenseful tale moves seamlessly between World War I and World War II and follows the stories of two iconoclastic women, the more mature Eve Gardiner and young American Charlie St. Claire.  The older Eve is damaged, aging, living in London, drinking entirely too much,  and still trying to recover from her experiences during the Great War a spy in Northern France for the all-female Alice Network (which existed and is based on historical records). Charlie has come to Europe in 1947, unmarried, pregnant, and trying to find her missing French cousin Rose who disappeared during the French occupation in 1945. Charlie and Eve form a fragile, unlikely friendship and work together while moving through France to solve the mystery of Rose and to find an individual who betrayed The Alice Network in 1915.  This is excellent, well-researched historical fiction and will appeal to readers who enjoyed Julie Orringer’s The Invisible Bridge and JoJo Moyes’ The Girl You Left Behind. Perfect for “after the relatives have left.” ~Lisa Cadow

And finally, HAPPY 2018!


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This post is one of our favorites to write each January because in it we are able to tell you about books we think you’ll actually have time to read (now that your many, many holiday activities are over). We also like this post because we can think of no better way to counteract the post-holiday blues than with a really good book. Some years we seem to focus on “FUN” fiction, other years highlight fiction that really makes you think about important subjects, some years we seem to focus on poetry or non-fiction items that caught our eye. We often add a pick for kids or young adults. This year, our three picks straddle a few categories; we sincerely hope this means that 2015 will bring eclectic adventures both in literature and in life.

Please ENJOY this first Book Jam post of a new year, and may 2015 bring you all many great adventures and books.

Just Mercy by Bryan Stevenson (2014) – Mr. Stevenson is the founder and director of the Equal Justice Initiative, a legal practice dedicated to defending those most desperate and in need: the poor, the wrongly condemned, and women and children trapped in the farthest reaches of our criminal justice system. Peppered with statistics about of people — those on death row who are people of color, the number of people permanently incarcerated for non-violent crimes committed when they were 12 or 13, etc… — Mr. Stevenson’s book brings these numbers to life in ways that make you care. He also, although he could not have known this when writing it, bring stories from today’s headlines home in ways that, be warned, may incite action on your part in 2015. (Note: The New York Times selected this as one of its 100 notable books of 2014, Esquire Magazine called it one of the 5 most important of 2014 and it was one of Time Magazine‘s top ten books of 2014.)~ Lisa Christie

The Girl You Left Behind by Jojo Moyes (2013): Hot off the presses in paperback in summer 2014, the main character of this book is a 100-year old painting that hangs on the wall of a modern London townhouse. The story behind its creation and the mysterious woman at its center takes us back to World War in Nazi-Occupied France and introduces us to two memorable protagonists from different eras — Liv and Sophie. There is surprising depth to this page-turner/love-story; it has the reader considering larger questions such as what is the value of art and just who has the right to own it? What an excellent plot and a very satisfying read — perfect to curl up with in the bath or by the wood stove after the relatives have left. And P.S. If you enjoy this immensely readable work, rejoice!, as this best-selling British novelist has ten other titles to explore – including Me Before You (paperback 2013) which this reviewer can also recommend. ~Lisa Cadow

A Little Something Different by Sandy Hall (2014) – A love story that unfolds through the eyes of 14 different observers of the boy and girl involved.  Perfect for the young adult who needs a bit of romance. Bonus, it is not too saccharine-sweet due to the varying perspectives unfolding the tale. ~ Lisa Christie

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