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Posts Tagged ‘Laura Hillenbrand’

The convergence of the NBA finals, NHL finals, The French Open, baseball season, and golfing tournaments has us thinking about one of our favorite categories for BOOK BUZZ — sports books that are about so much more. Today we celebrate this current sports mania by highlighting some books about sports that are also about so much more. This list touches on running, basketball, crew, track and field, and football – both the American version and the kind the rest of the world plays. Please note that we include titles for adults, young adults, and children, but we do not label them as we don’t ever want to tell anyone that they are too old or too young to read a great book.

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The Golem's Mighty Swing Cover ImageThe Golem’s Mighty Swing by James Sturm (2017) –  This graphic novel tells the tale of the Stars of David, a barnstorming Jewish baseball team that played during the Depression. Using the true story of a team that travels among small towns playing ball and playing up their religious exoticism as something for people to heckle, this books combines baseball, small towns, racial tensions, and the desperate grasp for the American Dream. For those of you in the Upper Valley, Mr. Sturm will attend the Upper Valley Nighthawks game on June 10 to sign copies of this graphic novel.

Born to Run: A Hidden Tribe, Superathletes, and the Greatest Race the World Has Never Seen Cover ImageBorn to Run: A Hidden Tribe, Super Athletes, and the Greatest Race the World Has Never Seen by Christopher McDougall (2016) – No, this isn’t a Bruce Springsteen song but rather an inspirational book about long-distance running. Though we have yet to read it (behold, this is the second time we’ve ever included a book we haven’t read, see below!), one of us has ordered a copy due to her daughter’s utter enthusiasm about it.  After turning the last page, this daughter completely changed her own footwear and training regimen. So lace up your running shoes and start learning about a tribe that lives remotely and traditionally in the Copper Canyon of Mexico and  is renowned for its members who run 100 to 200 miles without a rest. By all accounts, this is a fascinating anthropological exploration of a little known people as well as a work that has the effect of getting readers running for the pure joy of it.

Soar Cover ImageSoar by Joan Bauer (2016) – We have recommended this before in numerous posts. However, since everyone we know who has read it has loved it, we feel no guilt whatsoever to adding this tale of how a boy’s love of baseball helps him adjust to a new school, a heart condition, and well life, to this post as well. Please read it if you haven’t already and enjoy!

The Boys in the Boat: Nine Americans and Their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics Cover ImageThe Boys in the Boat (adult and YA versions) by Daniel James Brown (2013) – This story follows nine University of Washington students as they strive to become the rowing team representing the USA at the 1936 Olympic Games in Berlin. These young men were never expected to defeat the elite teams of the East Coast and Great Britain, much less those attending the Olympics; their story is one of grit and inspiration.

Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption Cover ImageUnbroken by Laura Hillenbrand (2010) – What is the sports aspect of this non-fiction book of surviving Japanese POW camps during WWII? Well, the amazing hero of this spellbinding tale was an Olympic runner long before he served the USA in the war. This book provides an incredible testament to the resilience of the human spirit. We recommend reading this and then joining your family to watch the movie version.

Fever Pitch Cover ImageFever Pitch by Nick Hornby (1998) – Fever Pitch is Mr. Hornby’s tribute to a lifelong obsession with English Football.  This award-winning memoir captures the fever pitch of fandom, coming of age stories, and the humor required to live a successful life.

Booked Cover ImageThe Crossover Cover ImageBooked and The Crossover by Kwame Alexander (assorted years) – Yes, we love Mr. Alexander’s books. Yes, we have recommended both these books before. But trust us, the youth readers you love will love these books about soccer (Booked) and basketball (The Crossover). They are poetic, perfect for reluctant readers, and both address how life happens while you have your eye on the ball.

Friday Night Lights: A Town, a Team, and a Dream Cover ImageFriday Night Lights by H.G. Bissinger (1990) – This book illustrates how sports – in this case high school football – can shape a community. It also inspired a pretty great television series (and a superb fundraising dinner for our town library). We recommend this book to football lovers (and lovers of small towns) everywhere.

The Playbook: 52 Rules to Aim, Shoot, and Score in This Game Called Life Cover ImageThe Playbook: 52 Rules to aim, shoot and score in this game called life by Kwame Alexander (2017) – This reminds us of another book of wisdom – 365 days of Wonder. But in The Playbook, Mr. Alexander uses sports and inspiring people such as Nelson Mandela, Serena Williams, LeBron James, Steph Curry and Michelle Obama to offer advice about life. As with all his writing we have read thus far, Mr. Alexander uses humor and the well chosen word to get his point across. Bonus — this would make a superb elementary or middle school graduation gift.

Paper Lion: Confessions of a Last-String Quarterback Cover ImagePaper Lion by George Plimpton (2009) – And now, for the second time ever (see above) we are including a book we have not yet read. But in our research about sports books we discovered that Book Week called this, “possibly the most arresting and delightful narrative in all of sports literature.” And we love the Detroit Lions; seriously Detroit could use a winning team people. So, we include this hoping someone will discover it as the perfect book for them, while we add it to our ever-growing pile of “to be read” book.

 

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On a GORGEOUS spring day last week – yes, spring does eventually reach Vermont – The Book Jam traveled to Vermont’s amazing Northeast Kingdom. We love to visit this region to bike, camp, ski and to simply enjoy the magnificent views.  This time, though, we were there to chat about books, to learn what librarians and booksellers in this more remote part of our state are recommending for summer reading, and to raise some money for Vermont libraries. (We also spent a bit too much in the Whistle Emporium, a superb gift/art/kitchen/just fun stuff store, located next to Claire’s.)  Thank you to the Vermont Community Foundation for making Pages in the Pub in Hardwick possible.

Our presenters to a packed pub at Claire’s Restaurant and Bar in Hardwick, Vermont included:

  • Linda Ramsdell, owner and founder of Galaxy Bookshop since 1988.  Linda considers herself extraordinarily fortunate to have spent half of her life in a place where books, people, ideas and imagination meet.
  • Lisa Sammet, library director of Jeudevine Memorial Library in Hardwick. She’s been a librarian, youth librarian, English teacher, farmer, and a Peace Corps volunteer. She also has been a professional storyteller in schools and libraries for over 30 years.
  • Rachel Hexter Fried, retired attorney and current Chair of the Stannard Selectboard. She supports independent bookstores and loves having the Galaxy in Hardwick. She is a voracious reader.
  • Lisa Christie, co-founder and co-blogger of The Book Jam Blog. Formerly the Executive Director of Everybody Wins! Vermont and USA; currently, a nonprofit consultant and mom who reads whenever she can find time.

We limited their written reviews to six words (those in the audience were able to hear a 2 minute review). So, although the list of books in this post is longer than our usual, we hope the brevity of the reviews helps you think about each, and helps you decide whether they should make your summer 2013 reading list.  Enjoy!

Non-fiction or reference book – For people who like to ponder large tomes during summer vacations

Former People by Douglas Smith. Selected by Rachel Hexter Fried. Bolshevik Revolution’s destruction of aristocratic Russia.

  

Memoirs – For people who enjoy living vicariously through other people’s memories

Elsewhere by Richard Russo. Selected by Rachel Hexter Fried. Russo’s life with his compulsive mother.

Prague Winter by Madeleine Albright. Selected by Lisa Sammet. Remarkable WWII story of courage tragedy.

North of Hope by Shannon Huffman Polson. Selected by Lisa Christie. Bear kills. Daughter grieves, grows, loves.

   

Adult Fiction – For a woman who only has time for the best fiction

John Saturnall’s Feast by Lawrence Norfolk. Selected by Rachel Hexter Fried. Poor boy’s rise to Manor master chef.

Sweet Toothby Ian McEwan.  Selected by Lisa Sammet. Cold war espionage, clever, love and truth.

Juliet in August by Dianne Warren. Selected by Linda Ramsdell. 1 horse, great characters, nothing terrible happens.

Ghana Must Go by Taiye Selasi. Selected by Lisa Christie.  Father Dies. Family Gathers. Gorgeous Prose.

  

Adult fiction – For a man who has enough camping equipment, but not enough good fiction

Canada by Richard Ford. Selected by Rachel Hexter Fried. Exquisitely written story. Parents rob bank.

The Dog Stars by Peter Heller. Selected by Lisa Sammet. Post-apocalyptic suspense, savage and tender.

Truth in Advertising by John Kenney. Selected by Lisa Christie. “Ad-man” matures late in life.                                      

                           

 Cookbooks or coffee table books or reference books – For your mom/grad/dad

Vermont Farm Table by Tracey Medeiros. Selected by Linda Ramsdell. Inspired photos, approachable recipes, neighbors, friends.

Saved: How I Quit Worrying about Money and became the Richest Guy in the World by Ben Hewitt. Selected by Linda Ramsdell.  Much to ponder at any point in life.

Picture Books (zero to 7) – books for youngsters to peruse under trees and in tree houses

The Princess and the Pig by Jonathan Emmet. Selected by Lisa Sammet. Fractured fairy tale with wry humor.

Books for summer campers/ young reader (ages 8-12) – books for those beyond tonka trucks and tea parties but not yet ready for teen topics.

Hold Fast by Blue Balliet. Selected by Lisa Christie. Langston’s poems. Homeless Family. Books save.

Books for your favorite High Schooler – “not required” reading for teens to ponder during the long hours of summer vacation

Good Kings Bad Kings by Susan Nussbaum. Selected by Linda Ramsdell. Rarely glimpsed window to a world.

Some bonus books mentioned by the presenters during their presentations:

Catherine the Great by Robert Massie. Mentioned by Rachel.

Atonement by Ian McEwan mentioned by Lisa S.

Far From the Tree by Andrew Solomon mentioned by Linda

The Danger Box by Blue Balliet mentioned by Lisa C.

At the end of our chats, the four presenters were curious about what audience members were reading.  Some of their current reading includes:

Beautiful Ruins by Jesse Walters; Unbroken by Laura Hillenbrand; Sweet Tooth by Ian McEwen; Freeman by Leonard Pitts; Orphan Master’s Son by Adam Johnson; Slow Democracy: Rediscovering Community, bringing decision-making back home by Susan Clark and Woden Teachout; Seward: Lincoln’s  Indispensible Man, by Walter Stahr; My Beloved World by Sonya Sotomayor; Mysteries by Benjamin Black;  and  Same Ax, Twice by Howard Mansfield.

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