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Posts Tagged ‘Laura Ingalls Wilder’

This week’s “3 Questions” features Micah Perks, award winning author of What Becomes Us and other works. Ms. Perks lives with her family in Santa Cruz, California, where she co-directs the creative writing program and is a professor in the Literature Department at University of California, Santa Cruz.Related image

Ms. Perks recently released her latest book – True Love and Other Dreams of Miraculous Escape, a collection of linked stories exploring the life-bending power of love through the lives of characters in progressive California.True Love and Other Dreams of Miraculous Escape Cover Image

Ms. Perks will appear at the Norwich Bookstore at 7 pm on Wednesday, October 17th to discuss her work with Peter Orner, author and Professor of English and Creative Writing at Dartmouth College. This event is free and open to the public. However, reservations are recommended as space is limited. Please call 802-649-1114 or email info@norwichbookstore.com to save a seat and/or secure your autographed copy of her latest work, True Love and Other Dreams of Miraculous Escape.The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe (Chronicles of Narnia #2) Cover ImageLittle House on the Prairie Cover ImageHousekeeping: A Novel Cover Image

1.What three books have helped shape you into the writer you are today, and why?

CS Lewis’ Narnia series and Laura Ingalls Wilder’s Little House on the Prairie series. I read both those series as a child and was completely, totally taken over by their worlds, one magical, one wilderness. I’ve been writing about the wilderness and about magic ever since. As a college student, I read Housekeeping by Marilynne Robinson, and that book changed my writing life. I fell deeply in love with her surgical language and her vision of women and girls who reject domesticity.Image result for houdini

2.What author (living or dead) would you most like to have a cup of coffee with and why?

Houdini! I know he was an escape artist, but he also wrote books. The first story in True Love is about Houdini. I have a major crush on him.

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3.What books are currently on your bedside table?

So many! To name a few: Florida by Lauren Groff, Archangel by Andrea Barrett, Wild Milk from Dorothy Press and Nothing Lasts Forever by Sina Grace.

As part of our mission to promote authors, the joy of reading, and to better understand the craft of writing, The Book Jam has paired with the The Norwich Bookstore in Norwich, Vermont to present an ongoing series entitled “3 Questions”. In it, we pose three questions to authors with upcoming visits to the bookstore. Their responses are posted on The Book Jam during the days leading up to their engagement. Our hope is that this exchange will offer insight into their work and will encourage readers to attend these special author events and read their books.

 

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DSC04450Late July — a time to tackle some of those books on your kids’ or nieces’ or nephews’ or grandkids’ summer reading list, a perfect excuse for your kids to spend a day in a hammock with a good book, an opportunity for rainy days to be filled with words, and the season when many young campers would love a care package full of books. So to help you navigate all these reasons to read, we’ve compiled our annual list of books for young summer campers — whether they have a tent pitched in their own backyard or are someplace far away.

To help guide selections a bit, we divided our picks into two categories 1) picks for young to middle grade readers, and 2) books for young adults. We do so, as always, with the disclaimer these categories are very, very loose; so please use them as guidelines, not gospel. We also decided to feature more recent titles, but this does not mean we don’t recommend the classics – The Wednesday Wars, Stuart Little, Harry Potter, Rose Under Fire, Swallows and Amazons, The Bluest Eye, Percy Jackson. We whole heartedly recommend the classics and older titles and blog about them often; we just don’t feature them in this post.

We hope you have fun with these books wherever you and your young loved ones may be this summer. Happy reading!

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Some fiction and non-fiction for young to middle grade readers

Bo at Iditarod Creek by Kirkpatrick Hill (2015) – This series brings us back to our days of devouring the “Little House” books. And while this series, unlike Ms. Laura Ingalls Wilder’s, is not a memoir, it feels authentic, and the illustrations are especially evocative of those etchings of Ma, Pa, Laura and Mary. In this sequel to Bo at Ballard Creek, we continue to follow Bo, her brother, and her two dads as they travel the Alaskan Gold Rush. Give this one to all your Little House fans; they will thank you. ~ Lisa Cadow and Lisa Christie

The Worst Class Trip Ever by Dave Barry (2015) – Perhaps my favorite book for kids so far in the summer of 2015.  Fans of Dave Barry will love the humor. Fans of fun adventures will love this book about four kids and their unusual plan to save the President using a kite and some stolen property (it all makes sense in the end). ~ Lisa Christie

X:A novel by IlyAsah Shabazz and Kekla Magoon (2015) – This novel looks at Malcolm X and his formative years in Michigan, Boston and NYC.  Written by his daughter and Ms. Magoon (author of another recommended kids book, How it Went Down), this book humanizes a legend, and illustrates how your choices and your reactions to them shape your life. ~ Lisa Christie

Lost in the Sun by Lisa Graff (2015) – SUPERB! Sad. Powerful. Trent’s 6th grade year is scarred by the aftermath of a tragic accident in 5th grade.  Nothing gets much better until Trent meets an unique and also scarred, force of nature called Fallon. The story of Trent and Fallon is one of second chances, recovery and friendship. It is also an honest look at rage, anger,and blame. As award-winning author Gary Schmidt states, “This book will change you.” ~ Lisa Cadow and Lisa Christie

Ruby on the Outside by Nora Raleigh Baskin (2015) – Ruby has a big secret that keeps her from inviting friends over to play and that takes her out of town every Saturday — her mom is in prison. She is fuzzy on the details of why her mom is incarcerated because, quite honestly, she does not really want to know. However, in this book she is starting middle school in mere weeks and she is thinking about her mom more often than when she was a young child. Plus, there is a new girl in her condo complex who just might be a friend. This story tells Ruby’s story and introduces the reader to the complicated lives led by children of the incarcerated. This would be a great book to read with your kids as it would lead to great conversations about bad choices and the ripple of repercussions they leave behind. ~ Lisa Christie

Echo by Pam Munoz Ryan (2015) – A plot influenced by magic realism and launched by a fairy tale about the fate of three princesses, allows a harmonica to travel among three children in three different states/countries (Germany, Pennsylvania and California) during WWII. This harmonica unites their very different war experiences (rescuing a father from concentration camp, ensuring a brother does not go to an orphanage, helping a family hold on to their farm) into one lovely book. Uniquely crafted, this story of love, music, and war will both educate and delight. ~ Lisa Cadow and Lisa Christie

Ferals by Jacob Grey (2015) – Caw was abandoned by his parents when he was very young and he has been living with and talking to the crows ever since. Then one day, he and his crows save a girl, and he finds his first human friend. Things then get complicated as they discover other humans who can talk with animals, and then learn that some of those “ferals/animal talkers” are intent on destroying the world by bringing the “Spinning Man” back to life. Believe us — this will all make sense to the kids who read this dark adventure for animal lovers. ~ Lisa Cadow and Lisa Christie

Graphic Library’s many stories — The Attack on Pearl Harbor, Matthew Henson, Jim Thorpe, Shackleton and his lost Antarctic Expedition, The Battle of Gettysburg (assorted years) – GREAT nonfiction graphic novels covering a variety of topics. ~ Lisa Cadow and Lisa Christie

images-1Some Fiction Picks for For Young Adults

Read Between the Lines by Jo Knowles (2015) – Ms. Knowles is one of our favorite Young Adult (YA) writers ever since we read Living with Jackie Chan. In this outing, she describes one day in the life of a few teachers, a couple of cheerleaders, some stoners, some jocks and some who don’t know exactly where they fall in the High School hierarchy. Her tale serves as a reminder that everyone has a story to tell, and maybe more importantly, that we would all be better off if we took some time to find those tales. ~ Lisa Cadow and Lisa Christie

Everything Leads to You by Nina LaCour (2014) – What I loved most about this book is that the main romance is between two girls, and it is NOT a big deal. That fact alone makes this book lovely. That matter of fact telling would never have been included in books aimed at teens of my generation. So thank you Ms. LaCour. But, in addition to some teen romance, this book gives you insight into the world of making movies, a mysterious letter from a silver screen legend, teen sleuths, homeless teens, messed up adults, bi-racial families, and great friends. And, just so you know, I tried to put this down because I needed to read something else for other work, but I kept picking it back up as I just wanted to know what happened in the end to all these characters. Enjoy! ~ Lisa Christie

All the Bright Places by Jennifer Niven (2015) – A superb, superb book about love, life and suicide told from the perspective of two teens – Violet and Finch, living in Indiana, trying to figure out what senior year of High School means, what colleges to attend and how to play the hands they have been dealt by life (him – abusive father, indifferent mother; her – she survived a car wreck, her sister did not). I SOBBED at the end, but am glad I have this perspective on young adult life and the aftermath of death. I can not recommend it highly enough; but be warned readers will be sad along with the happy. ~ Lisa Christie

The Name of the Star by Maureen Johnson (2011) – We are a bit late to the game on this book as we just discovered this YA series last month. But, we are so glad though as we loved this first book. In it, a Louisiana native relocates to a London Boarding school where she discovers an ability to see and speak with ghosts just as gruesome crimes mimicking those of the horrific Jack the Ripper begin. The good news is if your favorite YA readers likes this one, there are at least two more titles to devour. ~ Lisa Cadow and Lisa Christie

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Since we highlighted books for moms in 2011, we thought it only right to balance things out by recognizing good reads for dads. Posting the day after Father’s Day seemed like excellent timing.

Sadly, we couldn’t find an equivalent or, more importantly, an appropriate “Porn for Dads” title  to suggest on par with the Porn For New Moms book that inspired our Mother’s Day 2011 piece, so we decided instead to focus on books that consider parenting from the dad’s point of view.

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Before our search began in earnest, we took a little detour and our thoughts veered towards favorite father figures from young adult literature.We reminisced, of course, about “Pa” from the Little House on the Prairie series that marked our childhoods.  What wasn’t to like? He rode horses with bravado, played lullabies on the fiddle, could hunt and gather like no one’s business, fiercely loved his wife and kids and was darn handsome to boot (one look at Michael Landon in the TV series proves this to be true).
Gregory Peck also looms large for us in his portrayal of Atticus Finch in To Kill A Mockingbird.  Again, how can you go wrong with Atticus? He was a kind and wise  lawyer on the side of all that is right who allows his two children complete freedom and insights only when asked? Admittedly, he attracts danger at times, but that serves to make him an even more exciting Dad.

After this brief trip down memory lane, we  refocused and began looking for modern-day dads who write about and speak to the particular joys and challenges of millennial parenting. We realize that times are very different from when Pa was taming the frontier and that the noble Atticuses of the world raised their children over fifty years ago. So for this post we found fathers who are charting the journey now. Their accounts are fraught with occasional stumbles, honesty, and always humor. So here it is – a list of great gifts for your favorite dads or great reads for yourself about and by dads:

 Manhood for Amateurs by Michael Chabon (2009) – A collection of essays by a well-known and well-reviewed author, whose topics cover everything from the positive traits embedded in the loneliness of a suburban childhood, to questions from one’s children about one’s own use of drugs, to being raised by a single mom, to living with a complicated passionate wife, to being in Chicago with his young son when Obama won, to watching a daughter’s bat mitzvah.  But ultimately the essays, so very often simultaneously poignant and funny, are about the questions one encounters in trying to live a life.  Mr. Chabon’s answers and more importantly his questions, have me thinking, and also looking forward to reading his upcoming piece of fiction – Telegraph Avenue: A Novel (September 2012).  Read this if you are questioning things yourself – his insight and experiences might just propel you in an unknown direction. ~ J. Lisa Christie

Father’s Day: A Journey into the Mind and Heart of My Extraordinary Son by Buzz Bissinger (2012). This is not just a book for dads but one for all parents.  “Father’s Day” is a moving, exceptionally well-written and extremely honest memoir about a cross-country road trip that Bissinger takes with his 26-year-old son, Zach. It is a book that, as he explains it, has been in the writing for many years, since his twin sons Gerry and Zach were born three minutes apart. This short three minutes made a big difference in each of their lives: Gerry went on to live a “normal” life filled with girls, college, and graduate school; Zach, who experienced oxygen deprivation was effected cognitively and has spent his life  in special programs and under the care of his parents. Traveling across America with his son Zach, Bissinger explores his journey as a father, his relationship with his own parents, and the complexities of his own adult journey.  Father’s Day is about the expectations of parenthood and, in the case of Bissinger, the reality of the experience of raising an extraordinary son. (Note: If the name Buzz Bissinger sounds familiar, he is a Pulitzer Prize winning journalist and also the author of Friday Night Lights).

Shortlisted – only because we haven’t quite finished it yet:

 Dan Gets a Minivan:Life at the Intersection of Dude and Dad by Dan Zevin.  His 2002 book – The Day I turned Uncool:Confessions of a Reluctant Grown-up was a finalist for the Thurber Prize for American Humor, and has been optioned by Adam Sandler for a movie.

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Listen now or Download Kathleen Britton

Though recorded back in the springtime, it’s taken until late August to publish this special interview with Katharine Britton. Many thanks to this talented author for her time, thoughts, patience, and most of all for her new book.

We were lucky enough to spend a gorgeous last official day of spring with Katherine Britton on the porch of Lisa LC’s home. The weather truly enhanced what a privledge it is to spend time with a person who only recently earned the ability to call herself a published novelist.  Yes, Ms. Britton has published her first novel – Her Sister’s Shadow – and it is doing well on on beaches, poolsides, mountain tops, lake shores and assorted vacation spots across America this summer.

We spoke of summer, weather, the importance of home, family, birth order, fairies, elves, brownies and of course books.  The books that came up during our conversation include, in no particular order,

From her childhood memories:

Little House on the Prairie series by Laura Ingalls Wilder

Winnie the Pooh by AA Milne

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Counterpane Fairy by Katharine Pyle

Make Way for Ducklings by Robert McCloskey

Anne of the Green Gables by LM Montgomery

Little Women by Louisa May Alcott

Bronte sisters’ novels

More recent reading:

Jhumpa Lahiri’s works

The novels of Anita Shreve

The Big House: A century of life in an American summer home by George Howe Colt

House by Tracy Kidder

History of Love by Nicole Krauss (Also a pick for our “Stories for Old Men Waiting” blog and podcast)

Year of Wonders: A novel of the plague by Geraldine Brooks

Room by Emma Donoghue

We then discussed books we hope summer’s longer days allow us to tackle.  Now that her book tour is ending, Katharine’s “hoped-for” books include, include but are not limited to:

Parrot and Olivier in America by Peter Carey

Invisible Bridge by Julie Orringer

Caleb’s Crossing also by Geraldine Brooks and recently finished by JLisa C. J Lisa highly recommends this for people who like Geraldine Brook’s works and anyone with an interest in the history of Martha’s Vineyard or Native American history or the view from the point of view of a woman in colonial America.

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Listen now to NPL live classic books show – July 2010  or download here NPL classic books.

A mysterious classic

On July 12th, we had a lovely evening and a lively discussion with guests at the Norwich Public Library. This was our first jam cast in front of a live audience, and we must say audience participation leads the conversation in all sorts of interesting and thought-provoking directions.

The podcast lasted a record fifty-one minutes and covered lots of “classic” ground from Robert Louis Stevenson’s  Kidnapped to The Mysterious Island by Jules Verne and then onto Hermon Wouk’s Caine Mutiny and Anya Seton’s Katherine and The Winthrop Woman. All this in just the first fifteen minutes.

A classic woman

While you have to listen to the jamcast to determine whether we are right, we believe most of the books mentioned were memorable because they were either superb adventures, coming of age stories or provided a distinctly atmospheric experience for the reader. Other books we discussed include:

Classic Truman

Great adventures: Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson, The Terror by Dan Simmons, Brave Companions, Truman and John Adams by David McCullough.

Atmospheric excursions: Rebecca by Daphne Du Maurier, For Whom the Bell Tolls and the Old Man and the Sea by Hemingway, Jane Austen’s works, Maisie Dobbs series by Jacqueline Winspear.

Coming of Age Stories: To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee, Little House on the Prairie series by Laura Ingalls Wilder, The Yearling by Marjorie Rawlings, Heidi by Spyri, Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston, The Bluest Eye, (and then Zula, Beloved) by Toni Morrison.

There even ensued a spirited discussion of The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (two fans/two passionate non-fans) and there was even a reference to the book Toilets of the World in connection with Rand’s The Fountainhead. You’ll have to listen to the actual jamcast to find out why and how.

We also mentioned Girl in Translation; Worst Case Scenarios Adventure GuideConfronting Collapse, The Tipping Point, Bill McKibben’s works and Collapse by Jared Diamond.

THANK YOU to our three guests from Norwich – Mary, Jody, and Chris and Roy from neighboring Wilder.  Thank you to the Norwich Public Library for the space, the cookies and lemonade and to Ms. Beth who kept the library open when we ran late.

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