Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘New york Times Notable Book’

download.jpg
We are very excited to present this week’s “3 Questions” with the writer George Howe Colt, bestselling author of The Big House, which was a National Book Award finalist and a New York Times Notable Book of the Year (and that we LOVED), Brothers, November of the Soul, and his latest book The Game: Harvard, Yale and America in 1968. He lives in Western Massachusetts with his wife, the writer Anne Fadiman.

Mr. Colt will appear at 7 pm on Friday, December 14 at the Norwich Bookstore to discuss The Game: Harvard, Yale and America in 1968. The book offers an analysis of the USA during 1968 as seen through the young men who lived it and were changed by it. These men include a Vietnam Vet, two anti-war activists, an NFL prospect who quit in order to devote his time to black altruism, a postal worker’s son, a wealthy WASP, and the actor Tommy Lee Jones. Mr. Colt’s latest book received a starred review from Kirkus – “A richly detailed, engaging story… First-rate reporting and writing that will appeal to gridiron fans and general readers as well.” We think it would make a great holiday gift for the nonfiction readers in your life, and the Bookstore can ask Mr. Colt to personalize it for you if attend or contact them in advance.

This event is free and open to the public, but reservations are recommended as space is limited. Please call 802-649-1114 or email info@norwichbookstore.com to save a seat. Please note this event is on a FRIDAY, not the usual Wednesday night for events at the Norwich Bookstore.

The Game: Harvard, Yale, and America in 1968 Cover Image
And now, his answers to our three questions. (Our favorite fun fact – Mr. Colt is married to Anne Fadiman. Our favorite part of his answers — his use of baseball lingo to describe the stack of books by his bedside.)
A Little Princess (Puffin Classics) Cover ImageSelected Poems Cover ImageIs There No Place on Earth for Me? Cover Image

1. What three books have helped shape you into the writer you are today, and why?

The Little Princess by Frances Hodgson Burnett. Of the many books that got me hooked on reading when I was a child, this was my favorite, because it so quickly and completely transported me from the suburbs of Boston to the garrets of London.

Selected Poems by T.S. Eliot. After reading The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock, I wondered, “How did he know me?” The book that made me decide I wanted not only to read, but also to write.

Is There No Place on Earth for Me? by Susan Sheehan. The book that showed me what nonfiction was capable of.

download-2.jpgdownload-1.jpg

2.What author (living or dead) would you most like to have a cup of coffee with and why?

My wife, Anne Fadiman, with whom I am lucky enough to have a cup of coffee—or two—every day. She’s always interesting, always surprising, and makes a mean cold brew. If I had to invite a guest, I’d invite Jack Kerouac, an early literary hero of mine—but only if I could invite the pre-1957 version, before On the Road and all the craziness.

All on Fire: William Lloyd Garrison and the Abolition of Slavery Cover ImageIn the Darkroom Cover ImageScenes of Clerical Life Cover Image

3.What books are currently on your bedside table?

I just tidied up my bedside table, reducing some fifty or sixty books to a more-manageable-but-still-tottering skyline of 24. At the plate, on deck, and in the hole, respectively: All on Fire, Henry Mayer’s biography of William Lloyd Garrison; In the Darkroom, Susan Faludi’s memoir of her father; and Scenes of Clerical Life by George Eliot.

NOTE: As part of our mission to promote authors, the joy of reading, and to better understand the craft of writing, The Book Jam has paired with the The Norwich Bookstore in Norwich, Vermont to present an ongoing series entitled “3 Questions”. In it, we pose three questions to authors with upcoming visits to the bookstore. Their responses are posted on The Book Jam during the days leading up to their engagement. Our hope is that this exchange will offer insight into their work and will encourage readers to attend these special author events and read their books.
Advertisements

Read Full Post »

HMltHRpM_400x400.jpg

This week’s “3 Questions” features Melanie Finn, author of The Underneath. This novel follows a journalist struggling with the constraints of motherhood. In an effort to disconnect from work and save her marriage, she rents a quaint Vermont farmhouse for the summer. The discovery of a mysterious crawlspace in the rental with unsettling writing etched into the wall, unfolds a plot exploring violence and family.

Ms. Finn‘s previous work has been met with critical acclaim. Her first novel, Away From You was published to international accolades. Her second novel, The Gloaming, was a New York Times Notable Book of 2016,  a finalist for the Vermont Book Award, and The Guardian‘s “Not the Booker” Prize. After living in Kenya, Connecticut, New York, and Tanzania, Ms. Finn currently lives in Vermont with her husband Matt (a wildlife film maker), their twin daughters, three Tanzanian mutts, and two very old horses.

FC9781937512699.jpg

Ms. Finn will appear at the Norwich Bookstore at 7 pm on Wednesday, May 16thThis event is free and open to the public. However, reservations are recommended as space is limited. Please call 802-649-1114 or email info@norwichbookstore.com to save a seat and/or secure your autographed copy of The Underneath. The novel goes on sale on May 15th, so you will be among the first to read it.

 

FC9780143107552.jpgFC9780142422571.jpgFC9780723247708.jpg

1.What three books have helped shape you into the writer you are today, and why?

Bruce Chatwin’s Songlines, because of his lean prose and because, when I was 21, he told me in a dream that I should become a writer (seriously!); The Power and The Glory by Graham Greene because of the torpid physical and emotional atmosphere Greene creates, and his deeply flawed characters; Beatrix Potter’s books, because she’s not afraid to use long words when speaking to children, because of her humor, because her characters are true to themselves, they’re completely authentic.

Bruce_Chatwin,_July_1982.jpg

2.What author (living or dead) would you most like to have a cup of coffee with and why?

Bruce Chatwin remains my major literary crush; he died in 1989 but I still dream of going for a long hike in obscure mountains with him – maybe Tibesti in southern Libya. He was interested is everything, anything – his books were so diverse in subject matter: he was an art expert, he walked through the Australian desert, he wrote about two brothers living on a remote farm in Wales and a slave trader in west Africa. There are many others – Margaret Atwood, Jane Smiley, Joan Didion, Willa Cather, Vladimir Nabokov, Ezra Pound, Philip Larkin, Graham Greene, Naguib Mahfouz – but, ooo, I’d be too scared of them. I mean, what do you say to Nabokov?

FC9780316434812.jpgFC9780374282134.jpgFC9781771642484.jpg

3.What books are currently on your bedside table?

Leni Zumas’ Red Clocks, Samantha Hunt’s The Dark Dark, and Peter Wohlleben’s The Hidden Life of Trees.

Read Full Post »

As part of our mission to promote authors, the joy of reading, and to help independent booksellers, The Book Jam has paired with the The Norwich Bookstore in Norwich, Vermont to present an ongoing series entitled “3 Questions”. In it, we pose three questions to authors with upcoming visits to the bookstore. (We have a rotating list of six possible questions to ask just to keep things interesting.) Their responses are posted on The Book Jam during the days leading up to their engagement. Our hope is that this exchange will offer insight into their work, will encourage readers to attend these special author events, and ultimately, will inspire some great reading.

This “3 questions” features Jeffrey Lent and his latest work A Slant of Light, a novel about love, loss and war, and of theft and revenge. In it, a Civil War veteran returns home to find his wife and hired man missing and his farm in disrepair. A double murder ensues, the repercussions of which drive the narrative. Mr. Lent was born in Vermont and grew up there and in western New York State, on dairy farms. He studied literature and psychology at Franconia College in New Hampshire and SUNY Purchase. His first novel, In the Fall, was a national bestseller and a New York Times Book Review Notable Book for 2000, and remains a Book Jam favorite. His other novels include Lost Nation, A Peculiar Grace, and After You’ve Gone. Lent lives with his wife and two daughters in central Vermont. (Photo of Mr. Lent is by Geoff Hansen.)
Mr. Lent will be visiting the Norwich Bookstore at 7 pm on Wednesday, April 8th to discuss A Slant of Light. This event is free and open to the public. However, reservations are recommended as space is limited, and due to the high quality of his work, Mr. Lent consistently packs the house.  Call 802-649-1114 or email info@norwichbookstore.com to save your seat.
 
1. What three books have helped shape you into the author you are today, and why?

Light in August. This was my introduction to Faulkner and his impact is akin to a bomb going off every time I re-read him. True Grit. I read it from the library when it came out. I was in the fifth grade and ordered it at my local bookstore – the first piece of contemporary fiction I bought. Robert Frost. There was a collection of his poetry in the house, growing up. My parents had seen him read at Dartmouth, and he was writing of the world I knew.

search

2.What author (living or dead) would you most like to have a cup of coffee with and why?

I’d say Faulkner, but then it wouldn’t be coffee and what would I say? You’re a great writer, Bill? He already knew that. So I’d go to Frost and ask him what impact poultry had upon his poetry, and then I guess all I’d have to do is listen for several hours, which would be a grand thing.

3.What books are currently on your bedside table?

H is for Hawk by Helen Macdonald. The Big Seven by Jim Harrison. In Paradise by Peter Matthiessen, is waiting for me.

 

Read Full Post »