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Posts Tagged ‘Pages in the Pub’

Related imageThe holiday bustle has begun, and time for reading has diminished a bit. Rather than give up entirely, we decided to review a few poetry collections that allow you to read a page or two, enjoy, and move on to your next errand. They might also make great gifts for someone on your list. (Perhaps one will become your holiday 2018 go-to hostess gift?) We added a two short story collections for those who just don’t like poems. And, we ensured all the books are available as paperbacks so that reading and gifting are both a bit easier on your wallet if needed.

Enjoy! And happy holidays!

Priest Turned Therapist Treats Fear of God: Poems Cover Image

Priest Turned Therapist Treats Fear of God: Poems by Tony Hoagland (2018) –  I would have picked this up for the title alone, but a recommendation from delightfully smart and poetry-loving Penny McConnel of the Norwich Bookstore meant I had to read it. She wanted to include it in her upcoming Pages in the Pub selections, but ran out of choices; so, I am happy to include it for her here. This collection contemplates human nature and modern culture with anger, humor, and humility. I honestly wanted to read this collection in one fell swoop and had to force myself to slow down and savor each poem. As The New York Times wrote, “Hoagland’s verse is consistently, and crucially, bloodied by a sense of menace and by straight talk.” ~ Lisa Christie

Devotions: The Selected Poems of Mary Oliver Cover ImageJust about ANY poetry collection by Mary Oliver (assorted years) – Few poets have perfected the art of poems for quiet contemplation as well as Ms. Oliver. Her perfectly placed words lend themselves to thoughts of nature and friendship and love. We could not pick our favorite volume, so we are just recommending you pick any collection and start reading, or gifting today. – Lisa Cadow and Lisa Christie

What Work Is: Poems Cover ImageWhat Work Is by Philip Levine (1991) – Mr. Levine, a recent US Poet Laureate famous for his work about working class Americans, pens poems crossing many class divides. This collection won the National Book Award. It was also reviewed by The Library Journal, “What Work Is ranks as a major work by a major poet . . . very accessible and utterly American in tone and language.”~ Lisa Cadow and Lisa Christie

Life on Mars: Poems Cover ImageLife on Mars by Tracy K. Smith (2011) – A book about race, power,  paternalism, and so much more. This pointed collection won the Pulitzer in 2012, but her overall body of work has received numerous starred reviews and this comment from Publishers Weekly, her “lyric brilliance and political impulses never falter”. ~ Lisa Christie

Sailing Alone Around the Room: New and Selected Poems Cover ImageSailing Alone Around the Room by Billy Collins (2002) – Known by many for his frequent appearances on Prairie Home Companion, former US Poet Laureate Mr. Collins manages to produce powerful poems while also greatly widening the circle of poetry’s audience with their accessibility. This volume collects many poems from previous works in one collection, and thus is a good place to start admiring his poetry. ~ Lisa Cadow and Lisa Christie

The Tsar of Love and Techno: Stories Cover ImageThe Tsar of Love and Techno by Anthony Marra (2015) – The author of the amazing novel A Constellation of Vital Phenomenon created this superb collection of short stories. Each connects in themes about the USSR/Russia from the Cold War through today. This collection received multiple accolades as one of the best books of 2015, and may provide insight into the news about Russia dominating today’s headlines. ~ Lisa Christie

Flying Lessons & Other Stories Cover ImageFlying Lessons & Other Stories edited by Ellen Oh. (2017). Because Kids need breaks from the holiday bustle as well, we wanted to include something for them.  This collection provides a great group of stories for kids. I love the stories themselves, and I love the fact the collection allows us all to read more diverse authors. I also greatly appreciate that these are great for reading aloud as a family, providing some reading joy for adults as well. ~ Lisa Christie

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A major part of this blog’s mission is to put the right book in the right hands at the right time. This is powerful stuff – and no easy task. This can mean helping a book group to find a thought-provoking read for their next month’s gathering (Best Books for Book Groups). It can also be about helping people at holiday time to select the perfect book to give as a gift (Pages in the Pub). Recently, however, we have begun moving deeper into the community to connect people with the pages that might right for them. “BOOK BUZZ” is a successful initiative we now run regularly in local schools that has kids “talking books” with their peers, while simultaneously raising money for their libraries. Most recently of all, in fall 2017, we launched an effort to help bring book discussions to our town library that focus on medical issues. This is what we call “Novel Medicine.”

So why “Novel Medicine”? Try to think about it this way: “medicine” and “healing” are things that can happen both in and outside of an exam room or a hospital. In creating this series, we wanted to further explore the powerful learning and behavior change that can happen outside of a formal medical space when someone reads a book and talks about it – be it a novel, a memoir, or a collection of poems. This group is intended to put the right book in the right hands at the right time in a slightly different way: it aims to more pointedly explore the intersection between reading and dialogue, and health and wellness.

Discussions have to this point been moderated by Book Jam blogger Lisa Low Cadow, who is by night an avid reader and by day a health coach at Dartmouth Health Connect, a primary care clinic in Hanover, New Hampshire. (And, they have recently been hosted by the Norwich Public Library.) Her interest in this idea grew out of the thousands of hours she has spent in exam rooms with patients as well as in her role as facilitator in a Women’s Health and Wellness Group which over the past five years has read over ten books together. During this time, she has noticed the transformative effect that books, especially novels, can have on self-understanding and healing.

So far on our “Novel Medicine” journey we’ve read two graphic novels and a memoir, all of which are reviewed below. Each of these three works are excellent and inspired rich and robust conversations. For the two graphic novels we chose, we took advantage of a free program being offered by the National Library of Medicine (NILM) called “Graphic Medicine” which lends complete kits to groups or individuals interested in running this kind of discussion. Each kit includes six books, a discussion guide, as well as clinical information about the medical conditions being discussed. (For more information on the International 2018 Graphic Medicine Conference that is being held this August at the Center for Cartoon Studies in White River Junction, Vermont, just downstream from us, click on the following link: https://www.graphicmedicine.org/2018-vermont-conference/.)

We’d love to know your thoughts about this initiative and any books that readers might suggest that we might consider next.

FC9780452295544.jpgMy Stroke of Insight: A Brain Scientist’s Personal Journey by Jill Bolte Taylor (2009) You may have already seen the powerful  TED talk given by author Jill Bolte Taylor. It is one of the most viewed videos in their collection because her experience of having a stroke at aged 38 was a powerful one  — and the way she communicates about her learning is extremely moving. Taylor’s book has an equally profound effect on readers. Up until she had her stroke, Taylor was a Harvard trained neuroscientist at the peak of her career. She was both teaching about and continuing to study the brain. Then one morning, out of the blue, she experienced a stroke on the left side of her brain which profoundly impacted not only the rest of her life but also her understanding of the human experience, spirituality, and of how healing traumatic brain injuries needs to be approached. A must read for: all who have a brain(!) — but also for those who may have experienced a concussion and want to learn more about how the mind works and how to better heal it.  ~Lisa Cadow

FC9781592407323.jpgMarbles: Mania, Depression, Michelangelo, and Me by Ellen Forney (2012).  In this brave, candid, and brilliantly illustrated memoir about her bipolar disease, Forney takes readers on the roller coaster ride of her experience from her early twenties before her formal diagnosis, through the waves of her initial manic episodes (that include uber creativity as well as hyper-sexuality; reader beware), down to the depths of her depression, and through the difficult slog of figuring out how to effectively prescribe (and take) her medications.  This memoir is brutally honest – Forney doesn’t shy away from things that are raw and even potentially embarrassing. It is such an essential read for those trying to better understand what bipolar really means, what it is like to live with it, what the support of love ones can mean when challenged with behavioral health issues, and how management IS possible. Don’t underestimate the power that drawings can have on conveying a storyline and accompanying emotion! This was one of the most powerful books I read in 2017 and one that I have now recommended to numerous patients and friends. ~Lisa Cadow

FC9780375423185.jpgEpileptic by David B. (2006) – What is the experience of someone who grows up with a sibling who develops epilepsy at age 11? How does it affect family dynamics? How does it affect siblings who are trying to grow up and become independent during this time? How do friends, family, and the kids on your street treat you? What effect do multiple seizures and strong medications have on a human body? So many questions – and this book offers David B.’s experience and personal answers. This fascinating work was immensely popular in France (as it was originally written and published there in the late 1990’s) and has now been translated into multiple languages. It is intimate and takes the reader into a very personal place and space in the Beauchard family, through their family tree, and then into the adult life of David B. in Paris as a student and then as an aspiring cartoonist. His art is affecting and is heavily influenced by his fascination with mythic creatures and battles, heroes and monsters. One of the most memorable aspects of his work are the three “beasty” best friends, imaginary beings who shadow him through his childhood and help support him through his brother’s illness. Also fascinating is how David B. represents the changing and aging of his brother, sister, and parents. Particularly recommended for those who have acted as caretaker or caregiver during a loved one’s chronic illness.   ~Lisa Cadow

Stay tuned for more on this new Book Jam program; and in the meantime, enjoy these great books.

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It is that time of year again – time for our last minute holiday gift guide. We are almost, but not quite, too late for Hanukkah. However, we post in plenty of time for Christmas, Boxing Day, Kwanza, New Years, and all those just after the holidays birthdays you are too tired to shop for.  Whatever holidays you celebrate, best wishes and happy reading.

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For YA fans

FC9780062330628.jpgFar From the Tree by Robin Benway (2017) –  This novel won the 2017 National Book Award winner for young people’s literature; and, I applaud its selection (even when it was up against The Hate U Give which I also loved). I was completely charmed and challenged by this completely moving tale of three biological siblings (Joaquin, Maya, Grace) who discover each other as teens.  A complex tale of adoption, race, foster care, teen life, bullying, what makes a family, and love. Definitely one of my favorite books of the year for adults or kids. Enjoy.

FC9780062498533-1.jpgThe Hate U Give by Angie Thomas (2017) –  Sometimes it takes a work of fiction to give life to current events. And sometimes it takes a book for children to give all of us a starting point for conversations about difficult issues. Ms. Thomas has done all of us a service by producing this fresh, enlightening, and spectacular National Book Award Finalist book about the black lives lost at the hands of the police every year in the USA. Starr Carter, the teen she created to put faces on the statistics, straddles two worlds — that of her poor black neighborhood and that of her exclusive prep school on the other side of town. She believes she is doing a pretty good job managing the differing realities of her life until she witnesses the fatal shooting of her childhood friend by a police officer. As the jacket description of this book stated, The Hate U Give “addresses issues of racism and police violence with intelligence, heart, and unflinching honesty”. Just as importantly, it is a great story, with fully formed characters who will haunt you, told by a gifted author. Please read this one!

FC9780310761839.jpgSolo by Kwame Alexander with Mary Rand Hess (2017) – Mr. Alexander does it again, with help this time from Ms. Hess; I truly love the books this man creates. Blade’s father, an ageing rock star reacted to the death of Blade’s mom with an everlasting and highly dysfunctional descent into addiction and absentee parenting. As the story unfolds, Blade deals with high school graduation, his father’s inability to stay sober, his sister’s delusions of grandeur, the fact the love of his life has broken his heart, and a recent revelation he is adopted, by escaping to Ghana to find the birth mother he didn’t even know he missed. This is a terrific tale of music, maturing, love, adoption, and finding your way. It is all told in Mr. Alexander’s usual sparse, but effecting poetic style (with an added bonus of a great soundtrack).

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For Adults

FC9780316243926.jpgBurial Rites by Hannah Kent (2013) – Ms. Kent’s newest novel – The Good People – reminded us of how much we liked her first one. This first novel is based upon the true story of Agnes, the last woman executed in Iceland. In it, Ms. Kent vividly renders Agnes’s life from the point where she is sent to an isolated farm to await execution for killing her former master (or did she?). Be careful though, reading this may inspire some wanderlust because of the way Ms. Kent makes Iceland a character in a vast array of memorable people Agnes encounters. Enjoy. Note, this was also reviewed in our previous post “Books to Inspire Your Summer Travels“.

FC9780062684929.jpgUnbelievable by Katy Tur (2017) – An up front and personal account of the 2016 presidential race from the perspective of a MSNBC and MBC reporter following Trump from the time when everyone thought his candidacy was a long shot all the way through his election. As Jill Abramson said in a New York Times book review – “Compelling… this book couldn’t be more timely.” 

FC9781616205041.jpgYoung Jane Young by Gabrielle Zevin (2017) – For those of us who lived through the Bill Clinton sexual relations intern scandal, this book will seem familiar. What might not seem so familiar is the humor and candor about society’s standards contained in this “light” novel about how decisions we make when we are young have implications. Also reviewed during our recent Pages in the Pub.

FC9780399588174.jpgBorn a Crime by Trevor Noah (2016) – Funny, sad, and amazingly moving memoir about growing up a biracial child in South Africa during and just after Apartheid. Mr. Noah is insightful and honest as he dissects his life and his choices and the choices that were made for him. Each chapter begins with an overview of life in South Africa that relates to the subsequent story from his own life. Note – this is also a great audio book.

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For children

FC9781481450188.jpgPatina by Jason Reynolds (2017) – A teenaged girl learns a lot about life’s unfair experiences and how family can help you manage it all. We learn to love her family and how great track stars are made.

FC9780803738393.jpgThe Best Man by Richard Peck (2016) – This may be the best book I’ve read all year. Mr. Peck’s superb sense of humor and his ability to remember what it is like to be a kid make this tale a memorable, smile-inducing novel. Somehow, without preaching, he manages to cover gay marriage, death, divorce, war, national guard service, reconciliation, bullying, bad teachers, social media, hormones, school lunches, middle school, the British Empire, and the Cubs, all in a tale about being a kid in the 21st Century.  Read it today; no matter your age, you will not be sorry.

FC9780763677541.jpgThe Wolf, The Duck, and The Mouse by Mac Barnett and Jon Klassen (2017) – A SUPERBLY fun tale of interspecies cooperation and making the best of a situation. Bonus — great illustrations by award winning Jon Klassen. Also reviewed during our recent Pages in the Pub.

FC9781484717790.jpg7 Ate 9 by Tara Lazar (2017) – This book is proof that good puns are never done.  It is a clever Noir picture book (who knew there was such a thing) playing on a classic preschool joke/pun. Also reviewed during our recent Pages in the Pub.

 

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For anyone

Just a reminder that most bookstores also stock Jigsaw Puzzles, board games, card games, and literary gifts like socks or necklaces.

 

 

 

 

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