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Posts Tagged ‘Queen of the Night’

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This week’s “3 Questions” features Alexander Chee, a writer, poet, journalist, and reviewer. Both his latest book, The Queen of the Night and his Edinburgh have been bestsellers.  The Queen of the Night was a NYT Book Review Editor’s Choice and named a Best Book of the Year by NPRThe Boston Globe and the San Francisco Chronicle. Mr. Chee is an Associate Professor at Dartmouth College.
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Mr. Chee will appear on July 27 at the 1793 Meetinghouse in Canaan, N.H.’s Historic District as part of the The Meetinghouse Readings in Canaan. He will be accompanied by Major Jackson, a poet and professor of English at the University of Vermont in an event moderated by Phil Pochoda.

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The Canaan readings are held at 7:30 pm on four Thursday evenings in July. These events are free and open to the public; no reservations needed. Please note that this event is not held at the Norwich Bookstore. For more information, visit meetinghouse.us or call the Canaan Town Library (603) 523-9650.

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1.What three books have helped shape you into the writer you are today, and why?
I think we have books we hoped influenced us. I don’t know if we get to know the ones that really did influence us. Plainwater, by Anne Carson, and in particular, her essay, “Kinds of Water,” was a book I read and re-read for a decade, as if it could be a whetstone. The intense compression of the voice, the angular qualities of it, the humor, the playfulness–all were, are, qualities I aspire to. The Evidence of Things Not Seen, by James Baldwin, also left a profound mark on my imagination. The way he uses a series of murders as a lens to look inside the way the country functions, this changed my sense of what was possible in writing. But when I think back to the book’s that gave me a sense of permission, David Leavitt’s Family Dancing, his debut story collection, and Maxine Hong Kingston’s Woman Warrior, in particular, both left me feeling as if someone had opened a door–the door to the road that led here.
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2.What author (living or dead) would you most like to have a cup of coffee with and why?
David Wojnarowicz. I have a copy of his collection of essays, Close to the Knives, signed to me, and yet I have no memory of him directly. The younger me had the wisdom to get his signature on the book, but lacked the foresight to remember the day–he wasn’t as important to me until after I read the book, when he became, for a while, the single most important writer in my life. So, a coffee in order to rectify that, that is what I want most.
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3.What books are currently on your bedside table?
The Little Virtues, by Natalia Ginzburg, Logical Family, the new memoir from Armistead Maupin, and The Fact of a Body, by Alexandria Marzano-Lesnevich.
NOTE: As part of our mission to promote authors, the joy of reading, and to better understand the craft of writing and the living of life, we’ve paired with the The Norwich Bookstore in Norwich, Vermont to present an ongoing series entitled “3 Questions”. In it, we pose three questions to authors with upcoming visits to the bookstore or bookstore related venues. Their responses are posted on The Book Jam during the days leading up to their engagement. Our hope is that this exchange will offer insight into their work and will encourage readers to both attend these special author events and read their books.
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