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Posts Tagged ‘Random Violence’

As part of our mission to promote authors, the joy of reading, and to better understand the craft of writing, we’ve paired with the The Norwich Bookstore in Norwich, Vermont to present an ongoing series entitled “3 Questions”.  In it, we pose three questions to authors with upcoming visits to the bookstore.  Their responses are posted on The Book Jam during the days leading up to their engagement.  Our hope is that this exchange will offer insight into their work and will encourage readers to attend these special author events and read their books.

Today we feature Ann Hood, the best-selling author of The Knitting Circle, The Red Thread, and Comfort, among other works.  She has been the recipient of a Best American Spiritual Writing Award, a Best American Food Writing Award, a Best American Travel Writing Award, the Paul Bowles Prize for Short Fiction, and two Pushcart Prizes. She lives in Providence, Rhode Island.

She will appear at the Norwich Bookstore at 7 pm on Wednesday, December 11th to discuss her new book – Knitting Yarns: Writers on Knitting.  In this book, twenty-seven writers tell stories about how knitting healed, challenged, or helped them to grow. For instance, Barbara Kingsolver describes sheering a sheep for yarn. Ann Patchett traces her life through her knitting. Reservations are recommended. Call 802-649-1114 to reserve your seat.

  

1.What three books have helped shape you into the author you are today, and why?

Marjorie Morningstar by Herman Wouk,  Dinner at the Homesick Restaurant by Anne Tyler, and What We Talk About When We Talk About Love by Raymond Carver.

2.What author (living or dead) would you most like to have a cup of coffee with and why?

F. Scott Fitzgerald. Not only do I admire him as a writer, I think he would be an awful lot of fun.

 

3.What books are currently on your bedside table?

Aimee Bender’s new story collection, The Color Master, a South African  mystery called Random Violence by Jassy Mackenzie, and Elizabeth Strout’s The Burgess Boys.

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