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Posts Tagged ‘speaker series Norwich Bookstore’

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This week we feature “3 Questions” with Finn Murphy, author of The Long Haul: A Trucker’s Tales of Life on the Road.  Years ago, Mr. Murphy dropped out of college and started his long stint as long-haul trucker, covering covered more than a million miles to date. In The Long Haul, Mr. Murphy offers a trucker’s-eye view of America, reflecting on work, class, and the bonds we form throughout our lives.

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Mr. Finn will appear at the Norwich Bookstore at 7 pm on Wednesday, November 8th. This Norwich Bookstore event offers an excellent opportunity to listen and learn about life in America today, from a perspective many of us do not encounter in our daily life – that of a long-haul trucker. This event is free and open to the public. However, reservations are recommended as space is limited. Please call 802-649-1114 or email info@norwichbookstore.com to save a seat and/or secure your autographed copy of The Long Haul: A Trucker’s Tales of Life on the Road. (We think this might be a great holiday gift for so many on your lists – for those of you already shopping).

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1.What three books have helped shape you into the writer you are today, and why?

1984 because George Orwell completely nails authoritarianism. It’s attractions, it’s method, and it’s ultimate goal.

Anything by John McPhee, let’s use as an example Uncommon Carriers: Really good writing can describe anything and make it interesting. My book goes into many arcane details about truck-driving and moving people and I always had McPhee in mind when doing that.

Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy by John LeCarre because it shows how complicated betrayal can really be.

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2.What author (living or dead) would you most like to have a cup of coffee with and why?

Herman Melville. We both liked manual work, did manual work, and wrote about manual work. Melville would have been very much at home in a moving van on the road. It’s not a lot different than a whaling vessel. Hard labor mixed with boredom, travel, horrible clean-ups, and an amazing perch to observe human beings at their worst.

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3.What books are currently on your bedside table?

A Legacy of Spies by LeCarre. It’s the inside story of The Spy Who Came in from the Cold. That’s a great book! Maybe 160pp, but like Gatsby, puts it all in where it needs to be and nothing extra. Almost perfect writing. I say that for both. I flatter myself that I’m the world’s foremost authority on the LeCarre opus.

Doctkor Faustus by Thomas Mann. This is always on my nightstand. I can pick it up on any page and get mesmerized. Favorite quote from the book: “It’s not so easy to get into Hell.”

Ranger Games by Ben Blum. Recommended by a bookseller at an event. Army Ranger robs a bank. His cousin wants to know why. Riveting.

Girl Waits With Gun by Amy Stewart. I’m no book snob. I’ll read anything, almost. I haven’t cracked this yet but when the time comes for just plain entertainment, there it is.

NOTE: As part of our mission to promote authors, the joy of reading, and to better understand the craft of writing and the living of life, we’ve paired with the The Norwich Bookstore in Norwich, Vermont to present an ongoing series entitled “3 Questions”. In it, we pose three questions to authors with upcoming visits to the bookstore or bookstore related venues. Their responses are posted on The Book Jam during the days leading up to their engagement. Our hope is that this exchange will offer insight into their work and will encourage readers to both attend these special author events and read their books.

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This week we feature two authors – Elizabeth Marshall Thomas and Sy Montgomery – who are slated for an amazing evening exploring the natural world and discussing their new book Tamed and Untamed:Close Encounters of the Animal KindThis event will take place at the Norwich Bookstore at 7 pm on Wednesday, October 25.  NOTE: This event is free and open to the public. However, reservations are recommended as space is limited (rumor has it they are already compiling a waiting list). Please call 802-649-1114 or email info@norwichbookstore.com to save a seat and/or secure your autographed copy of Tamed and Untamed (a great holiday gift for those of you already shopping).

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While writing her books for adults and children, Sy Montgomery has been chased by an angry silverback gorilla in Rwanda, hunted by a tiger in India, and swum in the Amazon. One of her 21 books The Soul of an Octopus was a National Book Award finalist. Upper Valley residents can call her neighbor as she lives close by with her husband, the writer Howard Mansfield, and their animal menagerie.

Elizabeth Marshall Thomas has observed dogs, cats, elephants, and human animals during her half-century-long career and during her childhood in Africa. Her many books include Dreaming of Lions and The Hidden Life of Dogs. Like Ms. Montgomery, Ms. Thomas lives near the Upper Valley in New Hampshire.

 

In an experiment in formatting, we have mingled these co-authors’ individual responses to our three questions below.

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1.What three books have helped shape you into the writer you are today, and why?

The three books that shaped me were (1) The Jungle Book by Rudyard Kipling  (hated the movie) (2) The Wolves of Mount McKinleyby Adolph Murie, and (3) The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway—the first two because they’re about animals and Hemingway because he changed the way people write. ~ Liz M Thomas

FC9780805073683.jpgThe Outermost House by Henry Beston. A quote from these pages helped me to define what I set out to do in chronicling the natural world. “We need another and a wiser and perhaps a more mystical concept of animals…..For the animal shall not be measured by man. In a world older and more complete than ours, they move finished and complete, gifted with extensions of the senses we have lost or never attained, living by voices we shall never hear. They are not brethren, they are not underlings; they are other nations, caught with ourselves in the net of life and time, fellow prisoners of the splendour and travail of the earth.” ~ Sy Montgomery

FC9780415267472.jpgKing Solomon’s Ring by Konrad Lorenz. I read this classic account of animal behavior as a young woman just out of college and was entranced not only by its scientific revelations but also by the respect and affection with which this imminent naturalist regarded each individual animal. ~ Sy Montgomery

FC9780395924969.jpgThe Edge of the Sea by Rachel Carson. This title introduced me to the work of an author who helped found the modern environmental movement. I bought this, her third book, as a discard at a library sale the first year I began work as a newspaper reporter. I wasn’t yet an environmental reporter, but I wanted to learn about seaweeds and snails. I became a devotee of Carson’s sharp eye and poetic voice and sought outher later works, including Silent Spring, her sweeping expose of the chemical poisoning of the natural world. ~ Sy Montgomery

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2.What author (living or dead) would you most like to have a cup of coffee with and why?

The author I’d like to have a cup of coffee with is Hemingway, because he changed the way people write. ~ Liz M Thomas

Konrad Lorenz, the Nobel-Prize winning naturalist widely credited for founding the science of ethology, the study of animal behavior, one of whose books I mentioned above. And it would have to be more than a cup of coffee. How about a whole pot? There is not one animal known to humankind whose behavior I would not want to discuss with him. And–could I bring Liz? ~ Sy Montgomery

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3.What books are currently on your bedside table?

The book currently on my bedside table is Among the Bone Eaters by Marcus Baynes-Rock, because Baynes-Rock is an anthropologist who studies not only a human population but also the other animals who live in conjunction with them—in this case, Ethiopians and hyenas.  It’s a fabulous book! ~ Liz M Thomas

I actually don’t have a bedside table; instead, right next to my side of the bed is a bookcase the length of the bedroom. But the books currently “in play” on my side at this moment are:

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As part of our mission to promote authors, the joy of reading, and to better understand the craft of writing and the living of life, we’ve paired with the The Norwich Bookstore in Norwich, Vermont to present an ongoing series entitled “3 Questions”. In it, we pose three questions to authors with upcoming visits to the bookstore. Their responses are posted on The Book Jam during the days leading up to their engagement. Our hope is that this exchange will offer insight into their work and will encourage readers to both attend these special author events and read their books.

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Today, we feature Michele Campbell and her thriller It’s Always the Husband. Ms. Campbell, a New York native and resident of the Upper Valley, has taught law at the Vermont Law School and served as a federal prosecutor in New York City.  Ms. Campbell is a graduate of Harvard University and Stanford Law School.

Ms. Campbell will appear at the Norwich Bookstore at 7 pm on Wednesday, May  31st to discuss It’s Always the Husband. Reservations are recommended as they expect seats to “sell out”. Call 802-649-1114 or email info@norwichbookstore.com to reserve your seat.

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1. What three books have helped shape you into the author you are today, and why?

As a girl, I read The Witch of Blackbird Pond by Elizabeth George Speare and Little Women by Louisa May Alcott on repeat. I would literally finish the last page of these books and start over with the first. Both books had strong female protagonists who struggled to navigate the stifling expectations set for girls in their time and place, and had loving yet complicated relationships with their female family members. In high school, The Great Gatsby, with its impeccable prose and focus on issues of social class, caught my imagination. These three books shaped my interest in writing crime stories that explore issues of women, society and social class.

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2. What author (living or dead) would you most like to have a cup of coffee with and why?

Margaret Atwood. The Handmaid’s Tale and The Blind Assassin are two of the greatest books written in my lifetime, and I’ve read them both numerous times. She is astonishingly prolific, and I would love to ask her about the glorious span of her career – how she writes, how she manages so many projects, and how she moves, seemingly effortlessly, between genres. Ultimately, I just think she would be inspiring to talk to. She’s a visionary, a feminist, someone with a dark sense of humor and refreshingly strong opinions. I love her.

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3. What books are currently on your bedside table?

How much space do I have to tell you about all the wonderful books in my TBR pile? Like many writers, I’m a book hoarder. Between my actual, physical nightstand and my e-reader, I have enough books to keep me busy for months, if not years, to come. Some current notables: The Gunslinger by Stephen King, The Woman in Cabin 10 by Ruth Ware, Chronicle of a Death Foretold by Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Where It Hurts by Reed Farrell Coleman, Quiet Neighbors by Catriona McPherson, The God of Small Things by Arundhati Roy and A Passage to India by E.M. Forster.

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As part of our mission to promote authors, the joy of reading, and to help independent booksellers, The Book Jam has paired with the The Norwich Bookstore in Norwich, Vermont to present an ongoing series entitled “3 Questions”. In it, we pose three questions to authors with upcoming visits to the bookstore. (We have a rotating list of six possible questions to ask just to keep things interesting.) Their responses are posted on The Book Jam during the days leading up to their engagement. Our hope is that this exchange will offer insight into their work, will encourage readers to attend these special author events, and ultimately, will inspire some great reading.

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This time we feature Brooke Williams. Mr. Williams has spent the last thirty years advocating for wilderness. He is the author of four books and his pieces have appeared in Outside and the Huffington Post.

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Mr. Williams will visit the Norwich Bookstore in Norwich, Vermont at 7 pm on Wednesday, March 29th to discuss Open Midnight, his latest book which explores two themes: 1) a year he spent alone verifying backcountry maps of Utah, and 2) his ancestor’s trip from England to the American West in 1863. The event is free and open to the public. However, reservations are recommended as space is limited.  Call 802-649-1114 or email info@norwichbookstore.com to save your seat.

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1.What three books have helped shape you into the writer you are today, and why?

This is Where We Meet by John Berger (2006). I love how Berger takes seemingly everyday events and imbues them with intense meaning. This has been important to me, knowing that my own experience is valuable and can be mined for universal meanings.

The Voyage of the Beagle by Charles Darwin (1839). This was the grand adventure. But it is Darwin’s attention to the details of the natural world that serves as an example. The only real truth we have is the wild truth and this has served me as the foundation on which I stand and from which I step forward.

The Things They Carried by Tim O’Brien (2003). I love how his stories are based on real events but for me, it’s the relationships the characters have with one another that adds a dimension which makes this a book I read often.

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2.What author (living or dead) would you most like to have a cup of coffee with and why?

Robinson Jeffers, the California Poet. I get the sense that he was tapped into other quantum-like worlds. His writing is comforting and in a way, simple, and yet, in so few words transports me into those other worlds. I have many questions for him.

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3.What books are currently on your bedside table?

— Alexandra Fuller’s galley for Quiet Until the Thaw (2017), in which she tells historic stories through the eyes of Lakota characters.

— Landmarks by Robert MacFarlane (2016), a beautiful book about the language of the wild.

— The Earth Has A Soul by Meredith Sabini (2002). I love thinking of the collective unconscious as where our entire evolutionary history is stored.

 

 

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This “3 Questions” features Stephen Kiernan author of The Hummingbird and other novels.  Mr. Kiernan’s widely praised debut novel, The Curiosity, was published in 2013 and is in development at Twentieth Century Fox for film adaptation. He is a graduate of the Iowa Writers Workshop fiction MFA program and holds an MA from Johns Hopkins University. In his 25 years as a journalist, he has won more than 40 awards. He is also the author of the non-fiction books Last Rights and Authentic Patriotism. He lives in Vermont with his two sons.

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Mr. Kiernan will be visiting the Norwich Bookstore at 7 pm on Wednesday, November 11 to discuss his latest book, The Hummingbird. This novel was an Indie Bookstore pick in September 2015, with the review “’The Hummingbird’ is a powerful story about the critical role of human empathy in dealing with two important contemporary issues: hospice care and post-traumatic stress disorder. Kiernan’s characters are well-drawn and give unique perspectives on death, trauma, and providing care in difficult times. ‘The Hummingbird’ is a must-read for all who want to help loved ones die with dignity as well as for those helping veterans achieve normalcy after serving our country.” — Phyllis K Spinale, Wellesley Books, Wellesley, MA

The event with Mr. Kiernan is free and open to the public. However, reservations are recommended as space is limited.  Call 802-649-1114 or email info@norwichbookstore.com to save your seat.

 

1.What three books have helped shape you into the author you are today, and why?

I believe reading is the foundation of learning how to write, so a great many books have educated and informed my work. Three with radically different effects would be Pan by Knut Hamsun (for structure and the power of simple language), One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel Marcia Marquez (because it is a great work of genius and being humbled by a book is always helpful), and Sometimes a Great Notion by Ken Kesey (because it celebrates rich imagining and demonstrates how a book makes it own internal rules).
2.What author (living or dead) would you most like to have a cup of coffee with and why?
I would choose to have tea, (not coffee, as a proper Brit he would never drink coffee) with JRR Tolkien so I could ask him about turning story into myth, and investing narrative with spiritual purpose.

3.What books are currently on your bedside table?
My bedside table is covered with books about World War II and D-Day, which is in rough terms the topic of my next novel. Typically I read deeply for background and research, then put it all aside and let imagination write the book. This early part of the process is like putting extra logs in the wood stove, banking ideas to keep the house warm all night.

 

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We begin our Autumn season with a post from our “3 questions” series. Since Cindy is both a funny, funny lady who tackles serious subjects and someone we are also lucky to call a friend, we are thrilled to begin our back from “gone reading” posts with her book recommendations. 

This “3 Questions” features Cindy Pierce, sex educator, college speaker, and author. She is on a mission to give students perspective and information to help navigate the cultural, media and peer pressures, particularly around their social lives and sexual relationships and equip parents to help them do so. Cindy hopes to help make those “difficult” sex ed conversations a little less difficult.

Ms. Pierce will be visiting the Norwich Bookstore at 7 pm on Friday, September 25th to discuss her latest book, Sexploitation: Helping Kids Develop Healthy Sexuality in a Porn-Driven World. This event is free and open to the public. However, reservations are recommended as space is limited.  Call 802-649-1114 or email info@norwichbookstore.com to save your seat.

1. What three books have helped shape you into the author you are today, and why?

  • For Goodness Sex by Al Vernaccio (2014) – His approach to sexuality education aligns with my own, and I learn so much from him. I recommend his book and TED talks to everyone who works with or has kids. I was so honored when he agreed to write the foreword to Sexploitation.
  • Daring Greatly by Brené Brown (2014) – I have grown up being encouraged to put myself out there, roll with the inevitable stumbles, and find meaning (and humor) in all of it. When I read Daring Greatly, the title and stories in my latest solo show, Comfort in the Stumble fell into place. Righteous imperfectionism has been the theme and underlying message in my life and through all aspects of my work. A big part of the message in my book is that parenting and talking to kids about sex requires emotional courage and acceptance of setbacks and stumbles.
  • How To Be a Woman by Caitlin Moran (2011) – Caitlin Moran is a feminist with an outrageous sense of humor. I admire her balance of being fierce, strong and bold, while also being honest and vulnerable in a healthy way. Being able to laugh at myself helps me find my way through life. When people read or hear my stories, they feel so much better about themselves; keeping the bar low is a bit of a public service I provide.

2. What author (living or dead) would you most like to have a cup of tea with and why?

I would love to have tea with Wayne Dyer, author of The Power of Intention. He is one of the most influential spiritual guides in my life and will continue to be despite his recent passing. I have read The Power of Intention  several times and reread my highlighted sections of the book regularly. His message has been a major influence on how I approach each day with positive intention and gratitude. Over tea, I would like to hear more stories and examples of how the power of intention has manifested for him and others.

3. What books are currently on your bedside table?

NOTE: “3 Questions” is part of our mission to promote authors, the joy of reading, and to help independent booksellers.  The Book Jam has paired with the The Norwich Bookstore in Norwich, Vermont to present this ongoing series. In it, we pose three questions to authors with upcoming visits to the bookstore. (We have a rotating list of six possible questions to ask just to keep things interesting.) Their responses are posted on The Book Jam during the days leading up to their engagement. Our hope is that this exchange will offer insight into their work, will encourage readers to attend these special author events, and ultimately, will inspire some great reading.

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As part of our mission to promote authors, the joy of reading, and to better understand the craft of writing, we’ve paired with the The Norwich Bookstore in Norwich, Vermont to present an ongoing series entitled “3 Questions”.  In it, we pose three questions to authors with upcoming visits to the bookstore. Their responses are posted on The Book Jam in the week leading up to their engagement. Our hope is that this exchange will offer insight into their work and will encourage readers to attend these special author events.

We are excited to welcome cookbook writer Nancy Singleton Hachisu to the Book Jam. She’s the author of the newly published work Japanese Farm Food which tells stories and features recipes from her life on a rural farm in Japan. Hachisu has lived in that country for more than twenty years where she says she went “for the food but stayed for love.” Her full days are spent with her husband making tofu, plucking ducks, pickling vegetables, preparing noodles, and raising their two teenage sons. Glowing reviews for this beautiful and inspiring cookbook are pouring in from Alice Waters, Patricia Wells, and Micheal Rhulman. This is an event not to be missed.

Nancy Singleton Hachisu will read at the Bookstore on Tuesday, October 9th at 7 pm.  As always, reservations are encouraged. Just call (802) 649-1114 to reserve your spot or to order your signed copy of her book.

1. What three book s have helped shape you into the author you are today, and why?

I read voraciously as a child and was most influenced by E. Nesbit and C.S. Lewis. As an adult I favored mystery novels until I embarked on a mission to regain my ability in French, Spanish, and Italian about 10 years ago. This time also coincided with ever-increasing difficulties in getting boxes of books bought and sent off to Japan. And thus began a period of watching movies rather than reading that helped me create a bubble sort of world around me in which I could hear my voice quite clearly. I suppose our way of life helped shape me into the author I am today.

2.What author (living or dead) would you most like to have a cup of coffee with and why?

Elizabeth David because I love her whimsy, practicality, and food sense.

3. What books are currently on your bedside table?

Stacks of cookbooks…but they are not on my bedside table, they are piled up on the floor here and there around my room! And a book about learning to read Japanese through literature–I am woefully unskilled in my reading ability and need to force myself to step it up otherwise I will never cross the glass ceiling created by learning a language orally.

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