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Posts Tagged ‘The Fault in Our Stars’

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Once again, students in a local K-8 school – Crossroads Academy – helped us find GREAT books to give to kids and teens (and adults honestly) this holiday season. Their presentations during BOOK BUZZ were superb, and their book selections should help all of us cross some of our holiday shopping needs off our lists. Thanks to the generosity of the Norwich Bookstore, they also raised some money for their library.

We hope you enjoy their selections.

Sparkers Cover ImageEverything I Know About You Cover ImageSpy School Goes South Cover Image

Books for your friends who don’t like to read but who would love a great story

Emily Dickinson Poems Cover ImageThe Indispensable Calvin and Hobbes Ppb Cover ImageTwenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea Cover Image

Superb books you would assign to your favorite adult (teacher, aunt, parent) as required reading

The Only Girl in School: A Wish Novel Cover ImageWhere the Sidewalk Ends Special Edition with 12 Extra Poems: Poems and Drawings Cover ImageTisha: The Wonderful True Love Story of a Young Teacher in the Alaskan Wilderness Cover Image

Best family read-alouds

  • The Only Girl in School by Natalie Standiford (2016). Selected by Mia. An adventurous novel full of friendship.
  • Where the Sidewalk Ends by Shel Silverstein (1974). Selected by Brynne. Poetry for children and adults alike.
  • Tisha by Robert Specht (1976). Selected by Hannah. A determined teacher in snowy Alaska.

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Sports books that are about so much more

  • Mascot by Antony John (2018). Selected by Lisa. Accident changes all. Cardinals, friends help.

Hoot Cover ImageA Mango-Shaped Space Cover ImageThe Hunger Games Cover ImageStargirl Cover Image

Perfect books to help you ignore the fact you are waiting for your sister or brother to finish hockey practice

  • Hoot by Carl Hiaasen (2004). Selected by Rhys. Mystery of a boy saving habitat.
  • A Mango-Shaped Space by Wendy Mass (2003). Selected by Natalie. Girl with synesthesia copes with challenges.
  • The Hunger Games Series by Susan Collins (Assorted years). Selected by Hannah. Extreme dystopian world. I love it!
  • Stargirl by Jerry Spinelli (2000). Selected by Mia. Stargirl! A book full of love.

 

Sky Raiders (Five Kingdoms #1) Cover ImageThe Stonekeeper (Amulet #1) Cover ImageThe Penderwicks: A Summer Tale of Four Sisters, Two Rabbits, and a Very Interesting Boy Cover ImageThe Black Mage: Apprentice Cover Image

A series you won’t be able to put down, or what to read when you run out of Wimpy Kid books

  • The Five Kingdom Series by Brandon Mull (Assorted years). Selected by Rhys. Thrilling, fantasy, search for lost friends.
  • Amulet Series by Kazu Kibuishi (Assorted years). Selected by Jai. Trapped in darkness, can they escape?
  • The Penderwicks Series by Jeanne Birdsall (Assorted years). Selected by Thea. Heartwarming books filled with adventure and joy!
  • Black Mage Series by Rachel E. Carter (Assorted years). Selected by Eleanor. Magical competition. Love defeated. Last stand.

The Fault in Our Stars Cover Image

Books that are sad, but really, really good

The Invention of Wings: A Novel Cover ImageThe Brothers Karamazov: A Novel in Four Parts With Epilogue Cover ImageThe Parker Inheritance Cover Image
Fiction Books that do a great job of teaching history

  • The Invention of Wings by Sue Monk Kidd (2014). Selected by Laura. Two women. Same beliefs. Different paths.
  • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoyevsky (1879). Selected by Daniel. Russian saga about brothers’ tumultuous relationships.
  • The Parker Inheritance by Varian Johnson (2018). Selected by Lisa. Civil rights. Buried treasure? New friend.

The Lord of the Rings Deluxe Edition Cover Image
GREAT Books to give to your friends for their birthday

  • The Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien (Assorted Years). Selected by Gael .One hobbit to save the Middle-earth.

Not Quite Narwhal Cover ImageRescue and Jessica: A Life-Changing Friendship Cover Image

Picture Books to read with your reading buddy (or younger sister or brother)

  • Not Quite Narwhal by Jessie Sima (2018). Selected by Ms. Brodsky. Unicorn born Narwhal. Discovers is unicorn.
  • Rescue and Jessica by Jessica Kensky (2018). Selected by Ms. Brodsky. Girl and dog. Love and teamwork.

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The Crossroads Presenters

Grade 6

  • Hannah
  • Jai
  • Laura
  • Natalie

Grade 7

  • Rhys
  • Thea

Grade 5

  • Mia
  • Gael

Grade 8

  • Brynne
  • Daniel
  • Eleanor

Librarian

  • Ms. Brodsky

THANK YOU!

best christmas jumper jingle my bells

 

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So Halloween, it’s a time where we dress up as things we fear, and a time where the things we don’t want to talk about come to our doorstep asking for candy — no not the children, but the grim reaper, or witches, or corpses, or (name your demon here).

The parade of costumes last week, and a recent conversation during which one of our teens lamented, “Why can’t I have parents who don’t talk about uncomfortable things?” has us thinking — How does one develop comfort talking about uncomfortable topics?

Our answer, of course, is reading great books helps get these conversations started. So today, we are recommending books to help you think and ideally talk about some uncomfortable topics. May they all lead to great conversations.

Three items to note: 1) We experienced frustrating technical difficulties yesterday, denying us the chance to keep to our posting schedule of Mondays. 2) In our attempt to include all readers, we generated a long list of books and topics for this post. 3) We are making lemonade out of lemons and using some creative flexibility, by posting on two Tuesdays – today and next week. Today, we tackle death, mental health, addiction, and sexual assault. Next week – race, sexual identity, and politics. We truly hope these reviews lead to books that help us all have difficult conversations more often (or at least to better understand the news of late).

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Death

FC9781632861016.jpgCan’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant? by Roz Chast (2014) – First brought to our attention by Lucinda Walker, town librarian extraordinaire, this memoir is funny, poignant, and helpful. It truly offers a superbly humorous way to approach failing health and ultimately death. As Lucinda said in her six-word review during the 2014 Pages in the Pub, “Laugh. Cry. Laugh again. Then talk”. ~ Lisa Christie

When Breath Becomes Air Cover ImageWhen Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalinithi (2016) – (First reviewed in the summer of 2016.) At the outset, we know that the author, 36-year old Paul will succumb to lung cancer at the height of his career as a neurosurgeon. Don’t let this deter you from reading his incredible story and from benefiting from the insights he gleaned during his short life. Dr. Kalinithi is a brilliant writer who was curious from a young age about the workings of the mind and it’s connection to our soul. He studied philosophy and creative writing before committing to medicine. These studies give him other lenses from which to explore profound questions. He is candid with the reader about his personal and professional struggles. Ultimately, I found this book hopeful and inspiring. When I turned the last page I immediately wanted to share it with loved ones. ~ Lisa Cadow (and seconded by Lisa Christie)

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Mental Health 

FC9780525555360.jpgTurtles All The Way Down by John Green (2017) – As someone for whom Mr. Green’s novel The Fault in Our Stars devastated and sustained me because I read it while a lovely, young friend died from cancer, and as someone for whom his An Abundance of Katherines, had me laughing aloud as I pictured the text as an old-fashioned buddy movie (with a Muslim teen in a starring role), I hesitated to read Mr. Green’s latest novel as I was afraid it would disappoint. It does not. The main character – Aza and her best friend Daisy – a writer of Star Wars fan fiction, meander through high school, first loves, and math in Indianapolis. However, Aza also suffers from spiralling thoughts that take over her life, a mental health condition treated in a straightforward and insightful manner as this lovely tale unfolds. The characters feel real, the situations are not cliche, and Mr. Green’s writing about teen life propels the reader forward faster than he or she might wish — savoring a good story is a gift we all can benefit from. Perhaps, what touched me the most was his matter of fact acknowledgement at the end of the novel that mental illness affects Mr. Green’s own life. I also appreciated his gift of providing resources in his end notes, and second his hope that those who suffer from mental illness are not alone in their journeys. ~ Lisa Christie

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Addiction

FC9780393608960.jpgThe Outrun by Amy Liptrot (2017) – When Amy Liptrot decides to confront her alcoholism head on, she makes a beeline from the bright lights and big city of London to her home in the Orkney Islands of northern Scotland. She grew up there on a farm;  the “outrun” refers to a remote pasture on her parents’ land. In this frank memoir (one reviewers and readers alike have compared to Helen MacDonald’s phenomenal 2015  H Is For Hawk) Ms. Liptrot reflects on her sense of place and the role her upbringing played in her addiction. Her journey shares her triumphs, learnings, and challenges. She brings us to the brink  — and to the northernmost reaches of Scotland, writing at one point from an isolated cottage on the island of Papa Westray, where Scotland’s oldest dwelling is located dating from 3500BC. Highly moving, haunting, and recommended. ~Lisa Cadow

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Sexual Assault

FC9780804170567.jpgMissoula by Jon Krakauer (2015) – It took awhile for this to get to the top of my bedside stack of books, but once I started I could not put it down. Mr. Krakauer’s rigorously researched analysis of 52 months of reported sexual assaults around the University of Montana is enlightening, sad, anger-provoking and most tragically could have been written in so many college towns. This is important, read it, ponder it, and somehow act to end a culture in which victims are punished over and over again. ~ Lisa Christie

FC9781449486792.jpgthe sun and her flowers by Rupi Kaur (2017) – Somehow we missed Ms. Kaur’s first best-selling book, but in a time where the news is full of people behaving horribly and many of us feel angst and hopelessness, Ms. Kaur’s honest poems about heart-break, loss, rape, love, relationships, and hope seem needed. This collection is divided into five sections wilting, falling, rooting, rising, and blooming; falling deals with sexual assault and it’s aftermath. We leave you with a quote from this collection, “to hate is an easy, lazy thing, but to love takes strength everyone has, but not all are willing to practice”. ~ Lisa Cadow and Lisa Christie

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Anyone who has been to a drugstore in the USA lately knows that Valentine’s Day is just around the corner. All those red hearts can only mean one thing — valentines are coming. And, after a completely unscientific survey of those we have met the past few days, we have concluded people fall in two camps – those who embrace Valentine’s Day and those who don’t. (Some claimed to ignore it, but seriously, who can successfully do that?!?)

No matter how you choose to deal with this holiday, a very good book can help you cope with the pressure to find or keep love. And, now that we think about it, we admit they can even help you ignore the whole thing if you wish. To help with whatever strategy you choose, we have picked three books for Valentine’s Day – one for those of you in need of a love story with an edge, one for those of you who would like to embrace its sentiments, and one for those of you in need of a laugh as you search for and/or advise others as they navigate their path to “true love”.

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For those who need the catharsis of an angry love story

The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins (2015) – This book is going to be BIG.  We will describe it as the next Gone Girl (from a British perspective), but we will not say much more as almost any description of the plot will ruin the experience of reading it. We can also say this book is a great pick for those needing to feel a bit better about their own love life, and/or for those stuck in troubled places, and/or for those of you needing a page turner on these cold winter days. Read it before the inevitable movie based upon its prose arrives in a theater near you.

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For those needing a good book unapologetically about love 

The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry by Gabrielle Zevin (2015) – As people who love bookstores and booksellers, it is hard not to like this charming novel about a bookseller and his bookstore, the love found when a baby is left among his shelves, and the love life of one of his publishing reps. A “shelf talker” the author wrote for Mr. Fikry, the fictional bookseller hero of this book, to use in his store to sell this book (yes that is confusing) succinctly sums what we would say about “The Storied Life…“. Thus, instead of crafting another review, we now share Ms. Zevin’s fictional shelf talker. “Despite its modest size and the liberties the author takes, The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry has some lovely moments. Though my taste runs to books that are less sentimental than this one, I’m sure my wife, my daughter, and my best friend cop will love this book, and I will heartily recommend it to them.” And thus, we recommend this to anyone in need of a story that leaves you smiling, or for anyone needing a book to give someone who loves a sentimental tale. (e.g., your Mom)

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For those who need a laugh or two as they journey towards true love, and/or for those of you helping guide teens as they navigate their paths towards love

We Should Hang Out Sometime!: Embarrassingly, a true story by Josh Sundquist (2014) – Mr. Sundquist — a paralympian, a Youtube sensation who was helped along the way by the Vlog-Brothers – Hank and John Green (of The Fault in Our Stars fame), and a cancer survivor — has written an often hilarious, sometimes painfully awkward memoir about his attempts to find a girlfriend. As a reader, you follow him from his Christian Youth Group to college, and then to LA as he attempts to find a date. Ultimately, this book is about how self doubt and fear crippled him more than his actual amputation. Written for young adults, this memoir would make a great reminder to anyone that dating is awkward no matter who you are, but that somehow, we all manage our way through it. (PS – he finally gets the girl.)

And, we finish with a quote from a superb book and classic movie —  The Princess Bride — “This is true love — you think this happens every day?” May love happen for you often, even if not every day.

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